26/27 Rear Axle

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: 26/27 Rear Axle
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 02:10 pm:

I am going to rebuild a 26/27 rear axle next month. I have never rebuilt a rear axle before so I am doing a little research and trying to get ready for it. I have read the T bible, the axle rebuild booklet, and Iím in the process watching the videos. With what I have seen so far it does not look as intimidating as I first looks in the books. I have a few things I have to do before I jump into it. One thing I thought would be nice to have is a sheet showing the rear axle assembly with spots to record the measurements and notes that shows the original design specification and the allowed wear for each area. Does anyone know if someone has a rebuild spec sheet like that?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Money - Braidwood, IL on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 04:25 pm:

Look up Steve Jelf's videos on YouTube. He does a good job at video.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 04:35 pm:

I don't think I've seen all the specs on one page. You could find them in Glen's book and make one, though.

My video on the subject is titled Home Stretch because it only shows the end of the job.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AfxWPsF4KhQ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Loso St Joseph, MN on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 05:36 pm:

Jason,

Email Me I have one somewhere.

aloso@q.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JIM WILSON, AMORY, MS on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 05:52 pm:

I think the only Model T unique tools I needed were the one to remove the axle housing sleeves and I bought the little kit to remove thrust plate pins. If you have the drill/tap/screws already you wont need the kit. I bought an inexpensive dial indicator for Harbor Freight. Otherwise, a good tool box with a torque wrench should do. Since you plan to measure for wear, guess you have tools for that work.

I made up two fixtures to support the assemblies while working. One is an 8 foot 2X12 with a slot/hole that will hold an axle housing vertically. It's sitting between two ladders. Also gives a place for the drive shaft to lay and be supported while you are mating the ring gear and pinion. I also took a 2ft by 6 ft piece of 3/4" plywood, braced longitudinally (don't know if it was necessary but made me feel better) and put it between two saw horses. Drilled a 1-1/2 inch hole in the plywood so I can drop the axle thru when I worked on just the differential assy. Also was my differential work bench.

The main thing I found was that as I worked thru the rebuild, I needed parts I hadn't thought about or knew I needed. I am on my third order from Langs and waiting on an order now. I never could get anywhere trying to measure ring gear/pinion alignment using the dial indicator off the ring gear. Measuring off the pinion compared well with the solder method. Ran a piece of solder thru the gears and measured the gap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 07:42 pm:

Just like anything on the T, once you get into it it is really fun...if you don't mind getting really dirty :-) Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 08:22 pm:

I expect to get really dirty. I laughed through parts of the video as they opened things up and every was nice and clean. What I am not looking forwards to is trying to clean my basement shop of the greases afterwards. I was thinking about after getting everything opened up and initially cleaned, take the housings to the carwash with a few cans of engine degreaser.

Steve, I watched your video earlier this summer it was pretty good, just wished you had done it from the beginning.

The video did not show how to replace the thrust washer pins, but that should not be a big deal. What scares me the most is opening up the rear end and finding that everything is so worn that it needs a complete rebuild with all new parts ($$$$$).

The only tool so far I do not have that Iím sure I will need is a dial indicator. I will buy one or barrow one from my Father-in-Law. Who happens to have a metal lathe in his shop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 09:20 pm:

Why do you need a dial indicator? There isn't one pictured in the Model T Service Book published by Ford in 1925! I've NEVER used one, and have never had a problem with any of my rear axles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JIM WILSON, AMORY, MS on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 09:34 pm:

Thrust pin removal is discussed in the axle rebuild booklet. An alternative that I used is to drill and tap the pin as described but put in the screw and use a claw hammer to pull it out. Worked for me. I found that the replacement pins were not a press fit when installed so I used Loctite and "tightened" them with a punch as shown.

I second that this is a messy job but has been interesting and educational. My wife's treadmill is in the shop and she is complaining re the aroma of greasy parts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 10:38 pm:

It's not as big a mess as you might expect. Flattened cardboard boxes make a good working area. Put an oil change pan under the center of the housing when you split it. Cleaning out the housings, I stood them in a five gallon pail with old paint thinner in it and scrubbed out the insides with a toilet brush on a long handle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Saturday, November 16, 2013 - 02:52 am:

I am a true back yard graduate. I reconditioned a 1915 differential it was fairly simple and routine it just took a lot of time. The thin paper gasket between the joke and diff housing is often referred to as a shim it is not a shim only a gasket. There is a paper shim/shims that goes under the crown to attain the required clearence. A dial gage serves no purpose for this job. A good "sence of feel" is a big asset. The crown can be rotated and at four equal locations slack can be measured by moving the crown back and forth until you "feel" about .005. To assist, use four pieces of paper .003 - .005 and cut the paper through the four quadrents. The .005 paper should just crease and not cut through on all four locations. If the crease is cut excessively it is too tight and if it is not substantially creased it is too loose. The slow process is that the all the components require to be torqued to spec then measured if not to spec then it has to be disassembled and readjusted. This process took me about a week to complete. Also I installed the assembly backwards as it will go in both ways, I hadent noticed it until the final test for any binding, while turning the shaft clockwise the axle was turning anti clockwise. So take note as to which way it comes out take a photo. There are several methods to determine the appropriate slack but it is all assembled turn the shaft an "feel" for any binding or excessive drag. It should turn a full 360 with out any resistance. If any resistance is felt on one of the quadants it will have to be disassembled and an additional shim placed under the crown. Don't be in a hurry The unit has to stand on its end you will have to be creative and make a stand. The procedure is somewhat challenging but rewarding and time consuming. I would recommend 1.5 - 2 pounds of #1.5 weight grease as determined by the NLGI "National Lubricating Grease Institute" best of luck Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Saturday, November 16, 2013 - 06:00 am:

Use a stud puller, a body shop tool used for welding pins to dented metal and pulling out dents using a slide hammer, to get those little sheared off pins out. Works like a dream. If you or a hot rod buddy don't have the tool, I'll bet a body shop do it for bragging rights or little money.


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