Adjustment and operation of variable MOO horn

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Adjustment and operation of variable MOO horn
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Moorehead on Sunday, November 24, 2013 - 09:27 am:

Does anyone have any instructions for the variable Moo or Cow horn? Mine was working fine and then went belly up. I have tried adjusting it and get it close to where it was, but not exact. It makes a constant noise but will not vary much in tone when the lever is pulled. Is there a trick to it or am I missing something? Any help would be appreciated. It is running on 6 volts.
Thanks
Tom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Monday, November 25, 2013 - 10:27 am:

Tom:

I have never worked on the horn you have but if you have not yet done so - be sure and verify that you have full 6V power when measured right across the horn power connection and horn ground. Often with 6V horns the problem starts when a wire connection has become flaky at one end of the wire or the other. For those horns which use only a pushbutton, that also can be the source of voltage loss to the horn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Moorehead on Monday, November 25, 2013 - 12:28 pm:

Thanks John. I will continue to mess with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Tuesday, November 26, 2013 - 12:40 am:

Tom:

Some of those funny horns have motors in them and they draw heavy current. Unfortunately adjusting a horn as the fix when the problem is lack of full power results in a horn that is then out of whack and still doesn't then work when you have full power to it since now it is out of adjustment. Measure the voltage at the horn power terminals or hot terminal to ground if it has only one but do that when you are honking it and make sure the voltage stays a strong 6V. If things are restored and have nice heavy shiny paint, you might also have a bad ground if the case of the horn is used as the ground return for the horn electrical connection. If the horn has a #16 wire for power then it typically is going to draw 5 amps or less. That will give you at least some point of reference for what you might expect. Good hunting and post back with what you find.


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