OT - The Pipe An Exceptional Motor Car

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: OT - The Pipe An Exceptional Motor Car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By david greenlees on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 07:03 am:



The Pipe An Exceptional Motor Car Made in Belgium: After the post earlier in the week that covered resilient wheels and the Pipe Bus with Compound Suspension, we were curious to learn a bit more about the cars that the company built. What we found was info and photos about a very impressive car that you can learn all about @ http://theoldmotor.com/?p=109058


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 07:21 am:

I look at that engine picture and marvel at the valve linkage, longing to see it in actual operation, knowing it would be mesmerizing. Then there are the ones who would say that the valve train is hopelessly outdated and needs to be replaced with a dual overhead cam so it will be dependable in today's traffic....and if you leave the hood closed, no one will know......and since they don't do shows, only tours, they set it up for touring.......and it's their car, they will do what they want to with it.......and.........so on..............and..........so on..........Go figure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 07:22 am:

Now THAT is a cool looking engine! It'd be super cool to see all of the push-rods bouncing and the rockers dancing while the engine was running.

The polished magnets on the high-tension mag are neat. I always thought it would be be really cool to have the magnets on mine brass plated, though I'm not sure how/if that would work and not mess them up.

Question: does anyone know what's going on with the chain in the back? I can't decided if it's connected to the crankshaft or the exhaust camshaft, but either way it runs to a gear that is mounted on the firewall . . . for what?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 07:39 am:

The chain comes off the camshaft and drives the jack shaft that the magneto bolts to.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 07:41 am:

Damn, that car is ugly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By david greenlees on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 08:01 am:



"Question: does anyone know what's going on with the chain in the back? I can't decided if it's connected to the crankshaft or the exhaust camshaft, but either way it runs to a gear that is mounted on the firewall . . . for what?"

My guess is that it was connected to the exhaust cam and may have driven a mechanical oiler as you can see on this 1906 Fiat from the Larz Anderson Museum. Instead of a silent chain many early cars used a spring belt as this Fiat does. More more info about the Fiat @ http://theoldmotor.com/?p=51960


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 08:02 am:

Hey Royce, look at the picture some more: the magneto is driven from the front of the engine probably by a gear meshed with the cam gear, similarly to a T engine. Still not sure what the gear on the firewall is doing.

Also, I think the car is very attractive all over, except for that ridiculous windshield. If it just a flat windshield that came up vertically at the base of the current one, and the driver's door was a full rectangle, it wouldn't look nearly as crazy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 08:03 am:

Sorry David, was typing my post same time as yours. An oiler makes sense. Pretty wild that it looks like the entire transmission assembly is back up under the driver.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 10:02 am:

Seth:

Brass plating your magnets would very likely not affect them since brass is not magnetic and the magnets are not "rare earth" type which are affected by high temperatures and such. You probably would want to recharge the magnets as a final step but it should work OK. The only thing that will NOT work is replacing the magnets with solid brass ones :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By david greenlees on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 10:13 am:

'Seth:

Brass plating your magnets would very likely not affect them since brass is not magnetic and the magnets are not "rare earth" type which are affected by high temperatures and such. You probably would want to recharge the magnets as a final step but it should work OK. The only thing that will NOT work is replacing the magnets with solid brass ones "

I believe John is correct, I have recharged nickel-plated Bosch magnets and they took a charge and worked just fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 02:07 pm:

There is another interesting feature on this car: 6 valve stems per wheel. I noticed the same set up on a 1906 Packard in the Henry Ford museum in October. Presumably, the tube is segmented, or there are 6 tubes of which each inflate a sixth of the tire. Can anyone provide more information about this set-up? Are these tubes available today?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 02:08 pm:

Correction: 5 valve stems per wheel. The 1906 Packard had 6.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 02:50 pm:

Why is one valve stem on each wheel larger than the other four?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 02:59 pm:

Are you sure the smaller are not rim locks?? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Kemmerer on Thursday, December 12, 2013 - 03:06 pm:

only one is a valve stem. The other four are chaplets. chaplets are wedges inside the tire, when you tighten the nut (the part that loks like valve stem) it draws the wedge tight against the rim and wedges the bead in the clincher part of the rim. chaplets were discontinued around 1908-09.


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