Front Wheel Hub Question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: Front Wheel Hub Question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 12:23 pm:

My front wheel hub was slightly dented at the threaded section that the hub cap threads on to near the very end. I needed to replace the bearing race so I tried to straighten the threads so they would not rip off while tapping out the outer race. Well they broke out any way.

My question is, I think the hub is still usable but if I got a new hub can I just un-bolt the old outer one and put the new outer one on, or will everything all fall apart on me or the holes not line up. Is this outer hub replacement possible without dismantling the entire wheel?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 12:58 pm:

Adam, the outer plate can be removed easily. The hub is another story. The spokes are (or should be) wedged tight to the hub. I just replaced the spokes on mine and the amount of pressure on the hub is huge. (I'm assuming you have wood spoke wheels).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 01:17 pm:

Adam this is how the spokes look just before you compress them into the felloe the threads are part of the "inner hub" the outer part you are talking about is just a plate.spoke press


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 01:25 pm:

If you can find a way to keep the spokes flat and perpendicular to the hub, you might be able to press the hub out and press the new one in. If it won't work, you will need to do what G.R. shows in his pictue. The ends of the spokes should be tight against the hub. If it slips out easily, you will need to wedge it. I find tongue depressors or popsicle sticks good for that purpose. Be sure to shim equally on each side so the wheel will not be out of round. The reason the spokes should be tight against the hub is that if they are loose and you tighten the bolts, as you drive the weight of the car will push the hub against one side and the other until the spokes wear on the flat surfaces and they will wobble and creak, eventually leading to collapse.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 01:38 pm:

Ok thanks for all the info guys. I thought for a second that it might be an easy job like taking off that rear plate. I am going to run the wheel as is until I get enough money ahead to get the wheels re-spoked.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 02:17 pm:

Adam,
I've replaced the hub in a wood wheel (with steel felloe) with no problem. The trick I used was to heat the steel felloe with a hot air gun and the old hub slipped out and new slipped in easily. When the felloe is heated it expands and gives plenty of clearance to replace the hub. The spokes stayed in place and no press was needed to install the replacement hub. I did support the spokes with a few wood blocks but they seemed to be quite sound.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave DeYoung on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 02:29 pm:

I too have replaced a hub on a wood wheel. I did it by supporting the hub and worked my way around the wheel gently tapping each spoke end a little until the hub came out. To install, I did the same thing using the carriage bolts to align the hub to the wheel. Once the spokes were tight against the hub flange, I then installed the outer plate and tightened everything up. Be sure to peen the threads at the nut to prevent them from working loose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 05:39 pm:

Hey this sounds promising. Thanks Jim and Dave. I might give it a try to see if I can get the hub out. I won't force anything but if it easily taps out then it might be worth a try.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 08:30 pm:

I have had to insert hubs in two sets of wheels.

Over 40 years ago I purchased a set of wood felloe wheels with new rims from the Vintage Wheel shop in California.

They arrived by post each one packed separately with a ply piece on both sides and fixed together between the spokes with blocks and screws.

They had no hubs, we put the wheels in a press and supported them around the center of the spokes and pressed the hubs in. Both these cars have never suffered from a loose spoke and they have done thousands of miles in that time. If you have access to a press it will make it easy to remove and replace the hub without damage to anything.

19 years ago I purchased new wheels from New Zealand. I sent by post the steel felloes in boxes made for 2 felloes with a handle to carry them.

Friends who were going to New Zealand picked them up and returned them as their second allowable luggage. These also had to have hubs pressed into them. Support the spokes at the center close to the end so the hub can go through the hole and press the hub through.

If the spokes are tight now you can remove and replace the hub, and by doing so tell if your wheels are actually tight. If not you have the opportunity to pack the spokes to achieve a tighter fit, maybe a couple of coats of paint or other coating may be enough to keep it tight. And as Dave said, make sure you line the bolts with the holes before as you won't be able to move the hub around to line the holes up once its inserted unless its too loose.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Tuesday, December 24, 2013 - 10:41 pm:

Peter and Sally Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from the Danusers in Fulton Mo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, December 25, 2013 - 12:03 am:

Adam, there's good news. If it turns out your spokes are loose and you need to replace them, the Regan press shown in the picture above makes the job pretty easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Wednesday, December 25, 2013 - 12:44 am:

Steve, I think I am going to build one just in case. It looks like a great little project that will serve its purpose at some point down the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Wednesday, December 25, 2013 - 12:47 am:

I was pricing spokes and was wondering what the cost difference is between buying the materials at the different Parts Houses and pressing one together myself vs getting one made by one of the reputable wheel builders? Anyone know the price difference. What am I getting into in either case?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, December 25, 2013 - 06:58 am:

Adam: here are the plans I used to build my spoke press http://www.funprojects.com/pdf/WheelpressA2.pdf


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, December 25, 2013 - 07:26 am:

I just redid two wheels with spokes from Stutzman's. Total cost for the spokes was 180.00.
I pressed them myself and having never done this I found it to be fun and quite easy. I would guess to have the wheel done the cost would be around 150.00 or more per wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, December 25, 2013 - 11:34 am:

Don Who is Stutzman's and what is their contact info? thanks in advance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 07:37 am:

Stutzmanns grows the Hickory in their own forest on the property. They use huge draft horses and massive wagons (built by Stutzmann) to haul the felled trees to the Stutzmann saw mill.

The trees are sawn into lumber, then dried in the Stutzmann barns.

It is a very interesting place. The employees come from the surrounding Amish / Mennonite community, so there is a large stable for all the horses belonging to employees. Beautiful black enameled two man surreys and sedan carriages (made by Stutzmann) sit waiting to be hitched up for the ride home after work.

Stutzman Wheel Shop
33656 County Road 12
Baltic, Ohio 43804
330-897-1391


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 11:07 am:

What Royce wrote....I have to add that the Stutzman's work is incredible. The spokes are ready to finish and are spot on in every way. One thing you should check before you order any spokes. Make sure ALL your rims require the same size tenon, it is not uncommon for a rim to be swapped out over the years and to have a mix of tenon sizes on the same car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 11:21 am:

Thanks Don & Royce But when someone said they did custom work I have a set of 26 Buick wheels in need of new spokes So I will call them after the holidays and see if they need a whole wheel Or can I send them some old spokes that are badly weathered with longitudinal cracks I think these are the craftsmen I have been looking for!


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