OT Younger Generation will they want these cars?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2013: OT Younger Generation will they want these cars?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT J STEINER on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 03:54 pm:

There are alot of unrestored - restored cars / trucks sitting in our garages / barns not being used just sitting there.
We love them and enjoy them but will younger generation do the same..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 04:10 pm:

Robert, I believe that they will if we (the current owners) help spur their interest. That is how most of us became interested, someone somewhere sparked our interest in the cars when we were younger. For me it was my Dad's affliction with Model T's that rubbed off on me. I get my kids and grand-kids in the cars whenever possible. They all love the Model T because I do. Will they want them when I'm gone? I think so. It just takes mentor-ship.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 04:26 pm:

When I was a kid there were lots of cars sitting in garages and barns not being used. They belonged to guys who still liked them enough to own them. Some of the guys were old. Some not.

I don't think anything has changed. Collector car values continue to keep pace with inflation. Check out the sales prices at the recent RM 2013 Hershey auction to see how healthy the hobby is.

http://www.rmauctions.com/results/result.cfm?SaleCode=HF13


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 04:42 pm:

I agree with Royce. The cars at the RM auction are mostly upper end cars. I believe the more common lower end cars will also have a place in peoples hearts if they know that they can still be enjoyed and driven.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 05:28 pm:

I thin the prospect for older vehicles is better then ever in the future, more and more have people producing aftermarket parts for them. Fifty years ago, it was difficult to find parts for obsolete cars, even if the parts were available, they were difficult to find before the webbernet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 05:54 pm:

Existing collector cars are being changed as we speak. Very few want a 65 Mustang with a 6 cyl. no AC, no power stg. AM radio no pwr brakes or even drum brakes for that matter. Up-dated front ends, ect. The same car hopped up with all the extras including a big V-8 is a hot seller and commands a large $. People want the stuff we take for granted like all of the options listed above and more. Because that's a car today. T's will eventually become what you see at an HCCA show. Fully "restored" cars and a sea of car trailers in the parking lot to get them there. Unsafe & undriveable on the roads of the future.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 06:05 pm:

I don't know about all kids but my grandson wants the bone stock '46 ply and the granddaughters want the "t" they like the late models too such as the '65 corvair convertible. I think the new generation will be just fine (like a fun house mirror reflecting us)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 06:38 pm:

Charlie, I think you are correct in saying that Model T's are dangerous in your area. But I don't think that is true everywhere. You have more people in a 50 mile radius than I have in a 4 state radius. We have a lot less traffic, there are a lot more rural roads that make driving a Model T much more enjoyable. There are highways out here that I can drive all day on and not be passed by more than a dozen cars. So in your area I think you will see the trailer queens more than you will in flyover country. JMHO.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave DeYoung on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 06:39 pm:

I'm with Mike on this one. If we as owners do not plant the seed of interest in the younger generation, we will not have buyers for our cars when we are done with them.

My uncle got me into the T's by using the hands-on approach. We drove them together and that led to learning how they operate and how to fix them when needed. The more we did this, the more attached I got to them.

I know this is tough for some of you, but getting them in the seat of your pride and joy and letting them experience the car first-hand is the best way to build interest. If we all found a couple of younger people to mentor, our hobby will do just fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott McBrook on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 06:48 pm:

I also see the new generation lacking in interest of the antique cars. Go to an antique car meet and you see mostly old guys, no offense, I'm getting on myself.

Granted there are still tons of car and truck enthusiasts, but like was stated, they are interested in adding nitrous or big loud exhausts, killer car stereos, lowering them and mounting huge diameter flashy wheels with skinny profile tires.

I work on a fair number of "older" cars and the oldest is the TT. Even the 50s and 60's cars are a mystery to many of the new generation. I get inspected and they like the idea of the olders cars, but can't tune a carb, set timing, chokes, etc. When I mention anything like that I can see their eyes gloss over. It has happened for many yeras I'm not imagining things.

When I was younger lad, I would hang out with anyone working on cars or motorcycles and ask lots of questions. One guy who happens to own many of the cars I end up working on has a 16yo son, and nice kid but he has close to zero interest in car mechanicals and plays computer games all the time with other like minded guys.

I see the collector car market for these "original" style cars going down, and we have seen resto-mods prices go up, as the newer X gen want cars that are reliable and perform well like a modern car.

My 2cents.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 07:12 pm:

This one is a tough call. My crystal ball is broken. From what I have seen in my 29 years in education working with teenagers is that their world is entirely disposable and concepts like "repairable" and "timeless" are absent. The reality of their world is that old means "obsolete and useless"...it's recyclable and replaceable. Ask them about their favorite cars. They'll tell you it's the one they're driving or the new one they want to drive. They don't value permanency because their world is changing so fast that nothing lasts...or is expected to.

For those of us who love these old cars, they are representative of the values we were taught as youths. We respect things that are well made, functional, and tested by time. I agree that the best thing we can do to preserve these old cars is to get kids (younger the better) interested in them. But, you have to recognize you are competing with school, assignments, romantic interests, sports, and jobs that support their own cars. Probably the best thing that can be done is try to make an open offer for kids to experience our hobby...and bring your parents. I have a kid helping me restore my T when he has time. I don't expect him to be there all the time or even most of the time. I just hope it is quality time. As an incentive, I have offered to let him use my car for his high school prom when he's a senior in a couple of years if he helps occasionally. Will it create a life-long interest in Model T's. I hope so.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 07:19 pm:

I think , being a kid myself (16). We as a club need to increase our youth involvement by increasing our youth community.
We should have a page on our mtfca site that allows youth members to contact other youth members as well as having events particularly pertaining to youth. I as a kid see a lack of member my own age . I have many more ideas that I would care to share to increase our youths involvement . I plan on writing to our clubs president with my ideas and see if we can get the ball rolling with some of them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT J STEINER on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 07:25 pm:

What I have seen that in my region our club has over 200 members. the average is 65 a few young people (under 50 6 people) When we have club activities nobody brings their cars all modern 2000+ year old cars. I always bring mine rain or shine. so thats what I mean the new younger generation besides family members that was brought up with this hobby doest't spark a interest.
Either they have no interest or money.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 07:26 pm:

Kevin, What you are saying about today's teenagers is very true for most of them. (I also work in a High School) But there are a handful of them that do appreciate old stuff. And when you think about it, we don't need all of them appreciating it, only a handful will be enough. With a US population of over 317 million people, only a handful is needed to continue the hobby.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 07:41 pm:

I hear it all the time about the old cars not being wanted by younger people. They want the newer stuff. To a small extent that may be true. They say people want the cars they grew up with. Yes again to a small extent, Im 57 years old and I love Model Ts but I never grew up with them or for that matter a model A or anything in the 30s or 40s either. But I still love them. I would like to know the ages of all the model T owners and model T me club members today. I bet a lot of us never grew up with them unless dad or grandpa was a collector or from hearing the stories from them. As to a lot of the younger generation not knowing anything. Yes again to a small extent. I bet when we were growing up the gearheads and motorheads were a minority at your school. In my entire school (graduated in 1975 with K-12th having about 700 kids ) there were only 3 maybe 4 of us who knew a damn thing about mechanical stuff and cars in general. The rest did not care one way or the other and probably still do not care. I remember my mentors well. My Dad #1, Lawrence Thurston garage and gas station owner #2, Joe McDonald machine shop owner, and Herb Proutt Garage/machinist/junk yard owner. Everyone of them took the time to teach a dumb kid how to do things the right way. I owe a lot to these four people. Later when I had kids, I set my shop up for the kids to come too (like my dad did for my cousins and myself). When they were in there teens my son and all his friends would work on there own stuff. I showed them how when needed, and made them do there own work. The shop was open 24 hours a day. There was one rule ... "After you are done, I do not want to know you were here" That meant clean up before you leave. There were about 6 regulars that hung around, Sometimes at midnight or later someone would come by and use the tire changer or ???? but not once did they ever bother anything or leave a mess. They were the chosen few who knew the rules and had there own key to the shop. All of those kids, have grown up and are very productive members of our community. I believe our hobby and kids in general will carry on as we did, We just need to be a good Mentor for them ....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT J STEINER on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 07:45 pm:

Mike most of the kids today are into the rice burners or custom to street rods.. check out the cruise nights and car shows. Not so much for the Model T's but the cars in the 30's plus that was restored are now turning into rods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Saitta on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 07:55 pm:

I take one of my three Ts to car shows and general public events and have people sit in them. Take your picture! etc. I've copied pictures of the old roads, the modifications to cut wood etc. ship unassemble , stuck in the mud, Often have 50-70 get in the car. I'm sure to have a sign on the door so it appears in the picture (1916 Ford Model T)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Schreier on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 07:59 pm:

I would consider myself still pretty young at 23. I can only speak for myself, but I would take a bone stock, unmolested Model T or Model A over a hot rod, rat rod, ricer, etc. any day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT J STEINER on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 08:00 pm:

Bill that's great that you inspire these people to experience of being in the car but its just a memory for them, I also do the same even give out rides for that experience but its just a memory to them.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 08:31 pm:

Robert, I don't disagree that "most" are into what you say they are into, I contend that there are a handful that will always appreciate the Model T if they are properly introduced to it. I'm sure that the local hot rod club here in Lincoln is way larger than our Model T club. But we are an active Model T club and we do have younger people showing up. I'm currently working with a guy that is in his last year of college, his grandfather past away last year and left him a 25 Model T Touring car. He and I have been working on his car in my shop at least once a month since he got the car. He is very excited about learning and working on the car.

One of the things I believe that it takes is getting our cars out and letting them be seen. You obviously believe that as well. Your club needs to be more active with the cars, it is a shame that you are the only one that drives your car to a meeting. Weather permitting most of our meetings involve our cars and we always have a good number turn out. In December it was too cold to get the cars out but we did a carburetor rebuilding seminar that brought a good number of people to the meeting including the youngster that I just mentioned. We did the speedster project in the High School and a four year project produced one new member to our club, he is now building a speedster of his own. So it takes being a mentor, the interest can be developed.

I also believe that Michael Sharkey only 16 years old is on to something. We need to have activities that attract younger people (not just teen-agers). We need to have tours that include activities that young people like to do. My 27 year old son loves to drive a Model T, but tell him we are going to spend the day at museums and eating and he would rather find something else to do.

At the Hill Climb that we had in Lincoln this past summer we had people as young as 16 driving their cars up the hill. They had a blast!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 08:32 pm:

Jeff, You posted as I was writing about you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Thomas on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 08:59 pm:

I haven't seen a running model t go to the junk yard in a long time, so somebody is buying them. Our trip to McPherson, Kansas for the T Tour this summer was a real eye opener. I met a lot of young men and women who were absolutely fascinated with old cars, and were learning how to work on them. The hobby is far from dead, and I am sure every Model T on the road today will find a home...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 09:14 pm:

I have one daughter and no grandkids, my daughter and her husband have no interest in my two cars, i have given them a ride and that was enough. So i guess they will be sold or given on permanent loan to the museum.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 10:12 pm:

I am a very active member and (soon-to-be-ex-) national Director of the HCCA. I actively tour with a 1913 T runabout, a 1907 single-cylinder Cadillac, and a 1912 Buick touring car.

For several decades, the North Jersey and Southern Ontario Regional Groups of the HCCA have had a week-long joint tour someplace. It's for pre-1916 cars, and out of 50 to 60 cars there are always lots of Ts. The tour is always heavily loaded with little kids and teenagers. We have many activities for the kids. This year's tour was based in Woodstock, Ontario; next year's will be based in Princeton, NJ.

We typically have several three-generation families on our tour. Another fellow, much younger than I and also an HCCA director, tours with his two children, and his father comes with his own car. The older of the two children, all of 10 years old, took several pictures of this year's tour that were printed in the latest Horseless Carriage Gazette, and she is learning (in appropriate conditions) to drive her dad's 1911 Brush.

I am planning one of the routes for next year's tour. It will go from Princeton, NJ to Point Pleasant, on the NJ shore, very close to where Charlie B in Tom's River says it's too dangerous to drive a Model T. Sorry, Charlie - we don't agree with you! And, while we obviously trailer our cars from our homes to where the tour will take place, these aren't trailer queens - we will drive them 80-110 miles every day for a week.

The hobby is alive and well!

Gil Fitzhugh, Morristown, NJ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, December 26, 2013 - 11:54 pm:

Hey just because I stopped doing it doesn't mean you should. Your car. Your tour. And if it's the trailer comment that got you that's because of an HCCA show years ago at a state park down here. They drove on to the field and back onto trailers after. Wasn't meant as a knock down. Just a statement of fact.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 12:41 am:

My theory is that there are people who like old mechanical things and those that don't care a bit about them. Last summer, we got a booth at a local flea market to get rid of some stuff. A couple of younger people came by and they asked, "do you have anything mechanical for sale?" Our local public schools don't have shop classes anymore. Those kids who are more oriented towards mechanical things have to learn it elsewhere. An old car gives them lots of things to hone their skills on. My daughter and I had a blast restoring the rear axle in her 1914 T a little over a year ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 12:56 am:

Vern's daughter is not afraid to stand up in front of a crowd veteran Model T guys and give a presentation on how to rebuild a rear axle. Vern you have done a fantastic job of mentoring your daughter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dylan Thomas Wills on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 01:54 am:

Being a young "whippersnapper" myself (age 20), I can agree with some of the problem being lack of interest from the older generations; in connecting with my generation. Believe me, I'm not saying it's all your fault (I'm the kid who will listen and ask question for hours on end); but I have also seen old er folks complain about the lack of interest and participation from my generation, and pretend that I don't exist. And this isn't just with pre war cars; I have had much experience with that happening to myself, in the post war Studebaker world. (On average, you guys have a more open attitude to a brash yound kid like me, however).

Just my two cents..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 07:26 am:

A 65 Mustang with a 6 cylinder was a rare car when new. They have never been popular as a collector car. Most new Mustangs of any year except 1974 - 78 were V8 powered. The sixes will continue to hold appeal for those who can barely afford to own any sort of collector car.

The Model T hobby is different from most collector car groups because it centers around driving the cars. If we ever lose sight of that fact the Model T hobby will shrink considerably.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 07:33 am:

Royce, according to Ford in 66 58% were 8's the rest were 6's. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 07:54 am:

Thanks Mike!!! She's very proud of her accomplishment (as am I). She works as a purchasing agent for a local machine shop and should graduate this spring with a degree in Finance. For Christmas I told her I wanted a new set of "rethreading dies". Most stores just look at you when you ask for them. Sears used to sell them as did the local big auto parts stores, but not any more. She found them locally! I've about worn out my set. They are one of the most used tools in old car restoration.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 08:00 am:

Keith,

I don't know where you got that statistic, maybe it applies to all Ford products, but the 1965 Mustang had about 25% equipped with the 200 cubic inch six. That is a three to one ratio of six cylinder to V8. Or you could say 75% of 1965 Mustangs came with one of the V8 engines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 08:18 am:

Question Answered .... :-)








Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Flower on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 08:19 am:

I was 33yrs when I got my 1st 1926 coupe and I sold my 1986 Buick Grand National to buy it.....Now that was my baby .....
When I was a kid and went to car shows with my dad he would always say here are the real cars when we got to the Model T and outer old cars...
I've always love anything old homes,toys,cars you name it..I had to sell my last T about a year ago for the money and I swear I'm going to find something this year!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison (Vancouver Washington) on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 12:31 pm:

I'm 29 and I own a '26 T roadster...



...and I just made a deal to save and restore a complete 1916 Hupmobile Model N 5-passenger touring. My kids (12, 11 and 9) love them both. they beg me during the summer to take the T out and when I do, they fight over who goes first.

My oldest just had a video-tech class project to make a silent film. He asked to use the T in a Harold Lloyd/Buster Keaton inspired 2 minute short that was excellent!

I think they will be safe with them and there is hope for their generation. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 12:39 pm:

Today's youth will be tomorrow's elders... they'll get older, wiser, slow down, and learn to appreciate things of historical significance.

Then, they'll ponder whether those young guys with their flying cars, and jet-packs will ever take an interest in the old car hobby. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 01:21 pm:

With my generation (I was born in 1953), we who grew up in the '60's were all put into the same category as long haired, drug using, sandal wearing hippies. I was none of those things and, for the most part, could not stand the members of my generation that gave that impression. Still can't, but I was one of the exceptions as most of us were.

Today's generation are generalized as preferring to play video games in the dark basement, attic, or bedroom... or when in public, having their noses buried in their smartphones, texting their friend and disdaining all forms of work or play that involves exertion or stepping away from the computer screen. For these individuals, the Model T requires too much work, expense and exertion.

As with all generations, there are many differences and generalizations and while many of the stereotypes the older generation comes up with to depict a certain generation are true, there are all types of people, and just like all of the youth of my generation were not into drugs, civil unrest and rioting, all of the youth of today are not into video games, however, there are differences that may cause a small number of today's youth to get into Model T's, but not as many as we hope for, or are necessary to assume the responsibility of taking care of these cars into the future.

When I was a kid, we learned a lot about history in school which included the study of the industrial revolution, the Model T and Henry Ford. With today's generation, school is less about learning and more about indoctrination with politically correct subjects and social studies. With most boys of my generation, there was an interest in mechanics and we all knew how to work on the family lawn mower, eventually graduating to working on our own jalopies with our own tools (that we bought with our own money), in the family driveway, buying parts with money we earned at our after school or weekend jobs. Unfortunately, I don't know of one of my son's friends who have any interest, much less working knowledge of the internal combustion engine, nor do any of them work at an after school job, earning their own money.

Owning a Model T takes work, money and a basic mechanical ability to work on one. which, unfortunately, I just don't see in the majority of today's youth. Not enough anyway in the kind of numbers it will take for all of our Model T's to have good homes to provide the kind of care we hope for our cars after we are gone. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steve miller- mississauga,ontario on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 02:04 pm:

Eventually all the current Model T's may become a thing of the past and will out number the museums that would want them. A lot of lobby groups are involved in allowing antique vehicles to be used on the road. If that interest is not there to support their use the cars may be banned from the road. Our T's are now "Grand-fathered" in many jurisdictions. We could eventually become one politicians vote away from extinction


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 02:17 pm:

Had a talk with my oldest boy the other day who is in the Navy and moving all the time. Apparently he is more than a little interested in T's as he shows pictures of mine all the time.

Now I no longer have to "wonder" what will happen to my T's as he is an excellent mechanic and not far from retiring. That is of course, if my wife will let him have one!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 03:03 pm:

This is just a a quick glance at this thread but do you realize that 1/4th of the people that have posted on this thread are under the age of 30? I think that there are a lot of younger guys that have an interest in Model T's. I have had an interest as long as I can remember. But, with raising a family and serving a couple of decades in the Navy was unable to get into the hobby until after the kids were grown and I retired from the Navy. I then had some extra money that allowed me to purchase and support a Model T. Sometimes it takes time to realize a dream.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Carter - South Jersey on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 03:24 pm:

The percentage of people who have experience working on their own cars or machines in general is decreasing but on the other hand there are a lot more people to draw from and the information that is available today via the internet (encyclopedia, YouTube, this forum, etc) is way better than what people had in the past.

Here in New Jersey I see lots of interest from younger people. This past week our car was parked in the street at my uncle's house and while they couldn't see me, I could hear kids so excited to see the car and check it out This happens all the time - kids who are genuinely interested in Model Ts and are thrilled to see them. I wouldn't worry about future generations - just enjoy driving the cars and let other people see them and ask about them.

Regarding Model Ts in NJ - I think it is a great place to drive Model Ts! There are tons of 25-35 mph roads where you are not holding up traffic and where you don't have to worry about cars going 25mph faster than you coming up from behind like you have in the more rural areas (NJ has rural roads too!). Not only are the speeds kept down, but there are lots of people who get to see the cars so the smiles per mile is very high. I remember one drive this year where three people stopped and clapped as we drove by (no, not a parade..) - how often does that happen where you live?

Well, that is just my opinion. But then, what do I know, I have a '65 Mustang 200 six with drum brakes, no A/C, no power brakes, no power steering that I use as a daily driver (beater actually) and have had it almost 30 years. :-)

mustang


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave DeYoung on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 04:27 pm:

John: If that 'Stang' is a beater, my 79 Scout II is really in big trouble.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 04:32 pm:

John: We drive a 66 but only to church on Sunday. Or to go "cruisin". It is a 289 with drum brakes, no A/C.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 04:59 pm:

I'm 17 and I have a 1926 T roadster I am restoring


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 06:28 pm:

I bought my first T in 1975. At that time only "old guys" had Model T's. Everyone at the time was saying Model T's were on the way out because no one had an interest for them. On my first Model T tour I was the youngest guy there. Well, I am not anymore! Now days you go on a National tour, and I see many younger member and a lot of young kids. I think there is more interest in Ts then ever before. The amount of repro parts, and new parts coming out all the time, backs this up. Think of all the Model T rides that are given at the Henry Ford every year. This exposure to a lot of people I'm sure, will supply a lot of new Model T owners.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 06:51 pm:

A v8 mustang is overkill for that small car.The six is plenty and I have been in them and drove them.
But here is 1 issue I can discuss that may help give a different perspective.I may have said it before but oh well.
When I started on my TT project,it was inspired by all the storys I heard from my grandfather.
When I started asking the older folks questions during parts gathering and such,I was always pushed away as just another hot rodder.
"oh going put a 350 in it eh?" was so common of a question.
Well they changed their tunes as I drove the dang thing past them at Denton Farm park in 2005.
I actually heard 1 man say, "Damn he actually did build a Model T"
Well Duh,that is what I wanted.
So if you get ask questions by a young person,don't assume they are a hot rodder before you even speak.Give them the benefit of the doubt.

Sadly a few years before I let that attitude scare me away from ham radio,I got the same reception when I mentioned I wanted to use vacuam tube equipment. Everyone kept pushing a little 2 meter handheld with repeaters in my face and said I was wasting my time on that junk.
If I could learn the code I would try it again probably.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 07:01 pm:

Dan - I agree with you, I think that active clubs that get the cars out of the garage often will continue to grow. I know that our club picks up new members every year, with cars that no one else knew anything about or with cars that have been passed on by other members. It happens but your club has to be active, do lots of tours and the cars have to be visible because they advertise themselves when they are in public view. I also believe that touring attracts more new members than car shows. I think more people are in contact with the car while on a tour and only a limited group of people attend car shows. Just my opinion but when the cars are on the road stopping in small towns everywhere you will attract the person that has a Model T in storage or knows where one is stored. It sparks interest when they see how much fun that you are having while driving the car. It does this with young and old people alike. Again, just my opinion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 07:52 pm:

Spencer,

Thanks for posting .... :-)




Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Friday, December 27, 2013 - 07:59 pm:

Spencer, do you have any pictures of your car?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini on Saturday, December 28, 2013 - 08:32 am:

I am of the Baby Boomer generation with four kids, now adults ranging in age from 32 to 26.

I have always been interested in old cars, even as a grade schooler always reading about or researching very early cars for the heck of it. I really didn't realize they were still in existance until I happened on a guy just down the street from me who actually OWNED real, live antique cars!!! He was the one that turned my mild virus into a terminal disease!!!

I bought my first car with my paper route money, a 1930 Model A Tudor, when I was 15 and worked on it until I was old enough for a drivers license. From that time, I bought, sold and traded other old cars, got married and had the kids.

My kids have grown up with antique cars and have gone on tours with us since they were infants. They LOVE the old cars. My kids -- including the girls -- learned to drive a stick shift on either my 1926 Dodge Brothers Sedan or my 1923 American LaFrance Brockway Torpedo fire engine. My wife also drives the cars. All of my cars are spoken for with one going to each kid (with one left over).

Now, over the years, their friends have been exposed to them through us. Many have taken an interest in the older cars over the years and, if they have a license, I'll sometimes let them drive them.

Anytime I am at a meet, at the grocery store parking lot, where ever, if a younger person (from toddler to teen) comes over and shows an interest, I invite them to sit in what ever car I have with me, answer all their questions and, encourage their interest taking as much time to do it as I can spare.

I bought my first Model T (1914 Touring) about a year and a half ago. Since then, the family has learned to drive it. Curiously, the Model T gets more attention and interest than the fire engine!!!

I guess the bottom line is, it is up to us to first spark that interest and then nurture it. The interest is there. I think part of the problem is the misconception that all antique cars are exceedingly expensive. They're surprised to hear how affordable an entry level T can be. I even steer them to this forum or one of the two major T clubs and to publications like Hemmings.

I think the future of our hobby is secure. I pity anyone of the younger generation who, 20, 30, 40 years from now, tries to restore a current computer and gadget laden car!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Monday, December 30, 2013 - 06:42 am:

I think this is a multi-dimensional problem. Although I have been working on my own cars for the past 60 years, it has become prohibitive….too complex and expensive. My newest car is a 1990 Camaro on which I have performed some repairs…but I still can’t even replace the plugs.
In the 1950s cars were easy to work on and kids could master repairs, performance improvements and generally understand the workings of the machine. There were also auto shop classes in school and car clubs where talents were exchanged. We even went to the drags. Parts and supplies were inexpensive and plentiful and could be afforded by kids. Cheap cars were abundant.
I got a lot of my education from hours spent in the auto wreckers (oops, dismantlers) exploring all the dead bodies and learning so much. Can’t do that now because of insurance restrictions. Possibly *Pick Your Part* places still allow with limitations.
Today everything is different…expensive and subject to regulation. This includes paints, paint supplies, machine shop, parts, etc. However restoration parts and supplies have never been more plentiful…making restoration of all flavors of cars possible….just expensive…beyond the reach of many younger people. In my older age I am reasonably affluent, but I still find prices uncomfortable and am thwarted with EPA regulations.
I believe that expense, car complexity, absence of education and training all contribute to discouraging enthusiasm for older car ownership and restoration.
But, in keeping with the objective of this thread….I don’t think there will be future interest in Model Ts. Interesting thread *Age Brackets* indicates there are few young owners. Based on what I previously said, there will be few skilled people willing to work on a T, let alone restore one. The best to be expected is to buy one fully restored and find someone that can keep it going. Everyone has other interests.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Danuser on Monday, December 30, 2013 - 11:18 am:

Guys the younger generation is getting into T's and TT's as well as older folks who have also had fast hot rods. As a parts person who has a 60 yr collection of used NOS and reproduction, my sales increasingly go to fellows who haven't ever had a T or a TT. Its amazing to me how many people call, email me etc wanting to know about our hobby. The MTFCA started in 1965, I was still in college, after graduating in 66 from Cal Poly I joined the MTFCA # 2088. As I had purchased a 26 sq cab TT in 1961 or thereabouts for 150.00 plus all the T and TT Parts the fellow owned. It was restored in 1975-6 for the Fulton Mo Red Carpet MTFCA National tour, us 6 members, wives, kids and friends put on 3 National tours in the years to follow, I formed our Kingdom of Callaway Chapter of the MTFCA in 76 w/5 friends and myself, presently I'm the last surviving original member of our club. It never was a large club we now have 15-20 familys and its always been small. But we have fun. The only way to the USA is thru the windshield of a T or TT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, December 30, 2013 - 11:20 am:

I hope the younger guys join soon.

I spent 20 minutes responding to this thread and forgot to press the post button.

What are we discussing here? :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Monday, December 30, 2013 - 11:30 am:

Fred - That's funny! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warwick Landy on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 - 12:34 am:

The younger generation is alive and well in my chapter in Australia. Just recently it was a real pleasure to tour with my Father and my son in our T's. A friend also attended with his Dada and his young son. the future of the cars and the hobby is in good hands in my area!Just about to head off and enjoy our News Years Eve celebrations. All the best to you all for 2014.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Karl Gilchrist on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 - 05:31 am:

Interesting thread . I have just turned 50 and own a 1913 T, 1910 Hupmobile,1930 Model A and a 1967 Sunbeam Alpine . I have two children aged 18 and 20 The oldest has some interest in the T and the A but his passion lies with the Alpine. The other has no interest in any of them. The oldest has very little mechanical ability and freely admits he would struggle to keep the Hup running. He fiqures with the A and T he can keep them running with an excellent spare parts situation. I think that this spare parts situation may well be the thing that keeps people interested in driving early Fords - In the event of something happening to me I think the Hupmobile would go to my 72 year old father or if he is no longer with us or is unable to drive it will end up in a museum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 - 09:56 am:

Karl, if you were to advertise the T or the Hupp in the hcca.org classifieds with fair market prices, they'd be gone in two weeks. There's a big demand for brass-era cars.

Are they running? Where do you live? Join the HCCA and come touring! We'd love to have you!

Gil Fitzhugh, Morristown, NJ


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Taylor on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 - 10:19 am:

Michael Sharkey:

I agree on the idea of having a page on this forum for the youth group. I'm 14 and I own a 1926 Fordor named "Katie". It's fun to drive and I like to work on it together with my dad. It currently has a rod bearing "explosion" and the rod needs to get replaced. I would like to connect with other Model T'ers my age, but I don't know of any in the area. My friends like the Model T, but I think to them it's just a odd/cool old car, nothing more, nothing less.

This needs to be done as I think it would help to create a new generation of Model T lovers.

That's my opinion though,


Thanks,

Peter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 - 10:28 am:

I sure do Mike I just cant upload them the byte size is to big


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nathan Bright on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 - 11:03 am:

for what it is worth, we have at least 5 20-something persons in our HCCA club driving their own Ts! I am 23 just fyi. Im working on my speedster build currently.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, January 02, 2014 - 08:25 am:

Peter, My interest in Model T's was first sparked when, as a 9 year old, in 1963, I read two articles about the Model T in the July issue of my monthly Popular Science magazine. My dream of owning a Model T was finally realized 7 years later in 1970, when, as a 16 year old, I saw an ad for a 1926 Model T Coupe for sale in Tampa Florida and I bought it with my life savings of $600.00. For the next 2 years I restored it myself from the ground up and learned alot in the process, especially about perseverance and the importance of setting a goal and not quitting until that goal was met. It took me two years of scrimping and saving but I did it and 43 years later, I still have "Miss Daisy".

I don't think it would be feasible to create a site, just for your age group, for a site alone would not create the interest necessary to generate readers and participants and if it were created you would probably be the only one on it posting to yourself. Also, 14 years olds advising eachother on Model T's would not be the best approach because it would be best to get advice from those who have been there and done that, such as from the experienced members on this site, some of who have been involved with Model T's for 50 years or more.

The best way for you to find other 14 year olds interested in Model T's is for you to create them yourself among your friends. Invite them over to work on it with you. Write an article for the school paper. Take it to school with your Dad and demonstrate it to the students. Crank it up using the crank and take them for rides in it and teach the really interested ones how to drive it. Usually the first car a kid ever drives is the one they remember the most. Congratulations to you for your interest and good luck. You are a very special young man and your dad is very lucky to have such a son. Jim Patrick.

PS. The 1963 articles that sparked my interest can be seen in the below thread. www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/102160.html


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration