Early Brass Holey Carb, Patent.Pending

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Model T Ford Forum: Classifieds: Early Brass Holey Carb, Patent.Pending
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By V.R. Bob Campbell on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 10:23 pm:

This Carb is clean and all together. The cork float and mechanism work great. My guess is it is for a 1912 0r earlier. Will consider all offers and just add priority mail shipping.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Monday, April 24, 2017 - 11:18 pm:

pics?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 04:35 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 08:50 am:

Def. for a '12


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 09:37 am:

According to the Judging Guidelines, the Holley G with "Pats. Pend." top was used on '14 Fords. The 12's used the H-1, and 13's used the Holley S with the 2-screw top.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 09:57 am:

I've never seen one like this before. The type for 1912 uses the funky teeter-totter float assembly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 11:07 am:

I've only seen a couple of these. They went to a much simpler needle/seat/float arm arrangement for the standard Holley G. /This must have been a transitional model. By this time they must have been looking for faster and simpler production.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 12:05 pm:

Keith, looks like a regular 12 Holley to me. Can't see the top of the float but the screws look like it's the same. It's that cast pot metal lever that pivots on the screw in pin. I've never seen a 12 Holley with a different float are. Please let me know if there is another style. Kim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 12:48 pm:

Ok I now see it has the teeter-totter float assembly. The picture is cut off and doesn't show it very well.
I don't remember if mine has the clamp or not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 - 01:45 pm:

The advantage of the float arm in this one is that the weight of the float pulls the needle off the seat. The later --- and much cheaper and easier to make -- G needle is turned so the weight of the needle pulls it off the seat along with the head pressure of the incoming fuel. The G also has a replaceable seat, which this early one does not have.

Though it can't be seen in these photos, the needle in this design is the one with a tip that looks like an arrow, a ball higher up that fits in a holder and a cap that holds it all together. The seat is formed in the inlet of the bowl.

In these types of carbs, the original seat is usually machined off the boss, drilled and threaded for a replaceable seat and a modern needle. The problem with that is that the needle now is not pulled off the seat and any sticky gas or anything causing it to stick slightly causes it not to move off the seat. Most of the ones I see have had a small Grose Jet installed and a piece added to the arm to press down on the ball of the Grose Jet to stop the fuel flow. They work very well as long as the fuel does not get old and sticky.

I make a slightly different needle/seat system using the original seat, a new needle rod with hard brass balls and most of the original design to pull the sealing ball off the seat. This system also preserves the integrity of the original system & uses the original arm for correct float height. One other rebuilder I know uses a similar system which also seems to work well for him.


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