1913 Model T Ford for sale at Model T Haven

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Classifieds: 1913 Model T Ford for sale at Model T Haven
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Olson on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 02:18 am:

Has anyone taken a look at the 1913 touring that Mark has for sale at Model T Haven? Looks like it would need an extensive restoration but block is a correct dated 1913, has the right riveted rear end, early frame with cast round rear body mount brackets, 2 piece brass steering column etc. He says the engine is stuck however. I had a 1914 block that was stuck some years ago and that one was cracked bad in 1 cylinder so a bit of a gamble. Looks like an unmolested car for the most part, but should have round falloe wheels and some other details. Just curious if anyone has checked it out. If it was a bit cheaper I'd maybe consider it. Always nice to see the old brass T's get restored and back on the road!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Olson on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 02:34 am:

http://modelthaven.com/cars-pre/1913-model-t-touring


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 07:33 am:

Yeh, like twice what it ought to be, even if it is a brass car. They are always asking sky high prices for their "fixer uppers".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Braverman on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 01:20 pm:

Makes me feel much better about paying $11k for my poorly restored 1914.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 02:07 pm:

Some consideration must be made. He has to make a living at it. That is his business. I would imagine that he also needs to pay taxes and other overhead expenses. Those of us in this as a hobby pay those things in other ways. If we want him to be there when we need "that special part"? Or out there saving a lot of this stuff from the scrapper cockroaches? We need to consider that when we look at the prices he asks for the projects and parts he has available.
Just one of the realities of the world.

I rarely look through what he has to offer anymore, because life has managed to make me too broke to buy much of anything. However, I did happen to browse through his web site about a month ago, and looked at this one. I wish I could afford it. I would consider it for myself. A lot of good and desirable pieces there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Ogden on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 02:26 pm:

Tim Wrenn, why would you call that a "sky high" price for a fixer upper. Given how complete it is could you start with less and achieve a better fiscal outcome?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Hoffer on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 03:07 pm:

Mark is a hard working guy with whom I have had good dealings. I believe he offers his merchandise at fair prices given the realities outlined by Mr. Sheldon. Regarding this car, I have never started a restoration from such a beginning, but brass cars seem to have high enough prices at resale to make this possible without going too far underwater. It will still be a labor of love. I hope someone steps up and does a good job with this car!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 04:02 pm:

Well guys,it was just my opinion, no need to get your panties in a knot! We want guys to get into this hobby from square one, so part of my reasoning is, for $700 more a guy could step into what appears to be a reasonably nice '23 and drive it! Sure brass commands more, but sheesh...stuck engine, and is that a crack under the water jacket or just crud?; and the list of "gone" parts is too long...yes, Mark (I think that's his name) has to make a living at it. No argument there. I'm just saying I think it's too much. Someone WILL buy it at that and more power to 'em. But they better have deep pockets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 05:36 pm:

Tim, I think you're correct in that looks like a crack in the block just below the casting date. It's not the worst thing and could be repaired to save this correct block.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 06:49 pm:

Keith I agree. My '13 has one in the same place & JB Weld is doing its thing!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Ogden on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 07:01 pm:

Tim, you leveled some standard accusations against a seller and promptly offered the reasons as to why the price is what it is. Steering columns are 75.00 bucks, but why are 2 piece riveted brass ones 400+...the market allows. For a '13, could you achieve a better buy in for a complete '13, as opposed to the endless legions of 13's with /19 motors, 24 frames, repro this, missing that and so on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 09:36 pm:

Tim is a good guy - always posting positive & encouraging things.

Which - if you live in Ohio - can at times be a challenge ....


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Olson on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 09:40 pm:

It is an intriguing car from the standpoint of it being a barn find it has probably sat for years without anything being altered or changed in the last 50+years. Although many of these T's had later parts used as technically they were interchangeable to still be drivable back in the 1920's-1930's. It is true that a person can put more money into the brass T's as a good one will bring in the upper $20's-30K range and even higher for a well restored correct one. If I knew the engine was for sure savable and not badly internally cracked I would maybe consider it. I'm guessing there aren't very many "barn find" brass era T's left out there that haven't been restored at some point. It would no doubt be a labor of love but looks like it would make a fun project.Some years back I bought a 1914 touring from Mark for $5K and that car was pretty correct and had nearly all the right 1914 components to it except some top iron hardware, granted it needed a full restoration. I'm guessing a 1913 is worth a bit more than a 1914? Or is there much value difference there in a restored one? At the Randy Driscoll sale a nice straight mostly restored correct 1910 went for $25K which I thought was a decent buy. The 1911 at that sale which was an AACA winner I thought would have brought well into the $30K+ range but it didn't. Considering what you pay for a new truck now days I'd say brass cars are still a decent buy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Olson on Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 09:42 pm:

From prior experience it seems that Mark at Model T Haven is willing to negotiate on the prices, maybe a reduction would cover the shipping costs anyway, just a thought!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 01:06 pm:

My '13 touring was in similar condition back in 1961. It took me 4 years to restore it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Olson on Friday, September 01, 2017 - 06:24 pm:

Sometimes half the fun and enjoyment is restoring the car no matter how long it takes. It is no doubt challenging at times but quite rewarding when it comes together. The thing I like about this 1913 is it looks to actually be a true 1913 car with the original correct year components not the myriad of cars out there that have a couple 1913 parts on them with later frames and chassis parts and they still call it a 1913. I do appreciate the original parts if they can be saved, original bodies on a car are a plus to me if they're decent but I realize sometimes a new body is the best option also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Olson on Friday, September 01, 2017 - 06:26 pm:

Looks like the 1913 restoreable one has sold as it is no longer on his website.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration