NOS Model T Arvin Heater with Box

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Model T Ford Forum: Classifieds: NOS Model T Arvin Heater with Box
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ashley Lang on Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 12:27 pm:

New Old Stock Arvin brand heater for all Model Ts. Complete with box and instructions. It is a complete kit, box is tattered. Very nice piece! $350






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don on Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 02:20 pm:

PM sent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ashley Lang on Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 02:25 pm:

I have responded Don.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ashley Lang on Friday, January 19, 2018 - 09:06 am:

Sold - Thank you


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, January 19, 2018 - 10:17 am:

And thank you, for making it available and posting the pictures of all the parts! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil McKay on Friday, January 19, 2018 - 11:04 am:

Here's some information about Arvin and Indianapolis Pump and Tube...

Arvin traces its roots to an Indiana partnership formed in 1919 to produce tire pumps. After a frustrating experience fixing a flat tire, Quintin G. Noblitt, a mechanical engineer and inventor, told a former business colleague, Frank H. Sparks, that he could make a reliable tire pump if Sparks could sell it. Sparks said he could, and the Indianapolis Air Pump Company--the earliest predecessor of Arvin Industries--was born.

Noblitt recruited a third partner, Albert G. Redmond, to oversee the company's production of tire pumps, and the three partners each agreed to contribute $1,000 in initial capital. The company then rented an empty grocery store room for $10 a month, supplying a makeshift factory with second-hand machinery. By the end of its first year, the partnership showed a profit of more than $10,000.

The company's eventual name arose from its brief relationship with Richard Hood Arvin, a former arms and ammunition salesman who had invented a heating device for Ford automobiles. In 1920 Arvin, who had applied for patents for his heater but lacked the capital to manufacture it, offered his product to Indianapolis Air Pump. Arvin granted the young company exclusive marketing rights for his heater, and in return, Indianapolis Air Pump agreed to manufacture it. As a result, the Arvin Heater Company was formed in 1920 with Arvin, Noblitt, Sparks, and Redmond becoming sole stockholders.

In 1921 Indianapolis Air Pump leaped into the national arena when Sparks secured a contract to produce tire pumps for Ford Motor Company. That same year the company began experimenting with a tube manufacturing process that led to a company name change in December 1921, when the partnership was incorporated as the Indianapolis Pump and Tube Company. Noblitt was named president, and Sparks was appointed secretary of the new corporation, which established headquarters in Indianapolis.

In the spring of 1922 Ford Motor Company informed Sparks that it was planning to manufacture its own tire pumps, and soon afterward Redmond sold his interest in Indianapolis Pump and Tube to his two partners. Arvin sold his stake in Arvin Heater Company to Noblitt and Sparks, and the heater company was consolidated into Indianapolis Pump and Tube. That same year the company secured a contract to provide tire pumps for Chevrolet, and Ford, after a short-lived attempt to manufacture its own tire pumps, returned its business to Indianapolis Pump & Tube. With sales expanding, in 1923 the company constructed its first new factory in Greenwood, Indiana, and closed its manufacturing facilities in Indianapolis. As more gas stations began offering free air during the early 1920s, the company's tire pump business began to suffer. In response, it began diversification efforts and in 1924 introduced a new foot accelerator pedal for automobiles and a cast-iron heater for Ford, Chevrolet, and Dodge vehicles.

Also that year, Indianapolis Pump and Tube purchased the Dan Patch Novelty Company of Connerville, Indiana, producers of a line of wheeled toys. Noblitt quickly developed a new ball bearing wheel for the Dan Patch coaster wagon, while production of most other toy products was discontinued. In 1925 the company separated its heater business from its tube operations and established a plant in Columbus to produce metal heaters, cast-iron manifold heaters, and a new product, automobile jacks. Tire pumps and tubing production were isolated in Greenwood, while coaster wagon production remained at Connerville until the company purchased a building in Seymour, Indiana, and moved its toy manufacturing operations there.

In 1927 the Indianapolis Pump and Tube's name was changed to Noblitt-Sparks Industries, Inc. By that time Arvin hot-air heaters were being manufactured for every make of car on the market. In 1928 Noblitt-Sparks installed its first nickel-plating units in its Columbus plant and began producing additional automotive parts, including brake levers, hub caps, and bent steel tubing. With annual sales soaring towards $3 million, in the spring of 1928 the company went public and was listed on the Chicago Stock Exchange.

Source: http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/arvinmeritor-inc-history/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ashley Lang on Friday, January 19, 2018 - 12:48 pm:

wow Neil! Thank you for all of that information. It is amazing how all the little companies worked back then. It was a really neat piece to find. I have some other funky accessories coming up later today.


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