Wrecks, Crashes, Accident Photos

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Wrecks, Crashes, Accident Photos
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daniel M. Chapasko on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 07:59 am:

Do you have an old photograph of Model T wrecks or accidents? I would like to see real photographs of non movie related accidents. Do you know where I can find photographs of this type?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 08:37 am:

Enjoy....I like old T wrecks too, eBay and Internet now lets you find this kind of stuff. Before you had to buy publications, one I have with some T wrecks is Antique Cars Wrecks, by Old Cars Weekly, Kruse Publication, 1990.












Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 08:43 am:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 08:46 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 09:18 am:

My favorite is the Pie Turnover.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 10:01 am:

Ralph

Me too . Wonder if they were apple pies, now are apple turnovers.

Guess that accessory belly pan strap under the crankcase didn't help in preventing this accident.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 10:07 am:

The roll-over's a scream. The RR cars above look out of line too. Wonder if some industrious thief helped himself to the complete wheel and the tire & rim on the other side of the third T in line? No jacking necessary!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steve miller- mississauga,ontario on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 11:22 am:

New. Just after being picked up at the Toronto assembly plant


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Cassara Long Island, NY on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 11:22 am:

Reverse Engineering.....Placing a car in a horse drawn wagon!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 11:29 am:

John,

That is my favorite ... :-)


Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 11:55 am:

You should use that one in your advertising, Jim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Mullis on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 01:33 pm:

Here are my three.







Kinda makes you wonder what he hit?????


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 05:33 pm:


Sept. 2010. 1924 coupe's Ruckstell shifter tower broke putting the car into "neutral". Outside brakes semi-non-functional with no auxilliary brakes. Ran into the 1927 pick-up at about 50 mph. The pickup slowed both cars until a pull-out was reached... the coupe is not yet back on the road... 2 1/2 years later.

Due to the skill of the coupe driver (on the right above) no one was hurt. He lined up the coupe on the pickup so precisely that neither front fender was damaged, clearing the bed of the truck by about 1/4". On the right he points out the damage to his car and the 1/4" smudge in the rust on the pickup.

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 06:03 pm:

This one happened in Glendale Ca. in 1925


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 06:19 pm:

That was no small amount of skill on your part, either, Terry. What would have been his fate if you hadn't saved the day?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 06:56 pm:

First horse to the other; "Herb, how are you keeping a straight face after running in front of that damn thing?"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 07:03 pm:

Terry, That was really quick thinking on both your parts. Life comes at you real quick when you discover you have no brakes. Been there done that when the removable ear on the brake band came free in traffic on our 15 roadster. Disbelief that your a roller-skate on the road chews up valuable reaction time. Rusty sure lived up to it's old service day's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett on Friday, January 04, 2013 - 11:12 pm:

I witnessed Terry and Rusty saving a man's life. I was right behind them driving my dad's 27 Buick roadster when it happened. The man in the coupe had followed us for many downhill miles prior to a rest stop and wound up ahead of us on the way out. Very shortly after we crested a hill and I said to dad, "Say, that coupe is really moving!". Seconds thereafter Terry was hit from behind without warning and safely stopped both cars. There was no one in front of them to help if Terry had not been there. This was steep, rugged country and the coupe had no brakes and a full set of original plate glass windows. Just imagine the ugly results averted by skill and good fortune..
Just looking at the photos posted, they are interesting but people must hast been hurt or killed in those wrecks. Please put brakes and safety glass in your T's.
Fordially, Erik


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Elenbaas - Granger, Washington on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 01:54 am:

Sorry this not a T but it younger brother the A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 02:18 am:

A bunch more Model T wreck photos at:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/254277.html?1324400436

And another:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/283967.html?1335233772

And:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/189214.html?1297359106

And:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/142818.html
Scroll down

And:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/125234.html?12658943

And:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/312911.html?1348369924

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 03:54 am:

Roads back in the 1920's and 1930's where not good in Denmark either. Even though it's built, the surface was not as good as todays tarmac or concrete. When the wheater was wet, they got slippery:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 05:31 am:

Result of a collision between a 'Palm' and a T. Which car is which? The Palm was, in effect, a re-badged T.

Accident in Mount Jeffcott region Victoria Australia in 1925.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 06:25 am:

Two interesting cars Dane. The Ford should be a pre embargo Canadian car. Going on the round felloe non-demountable wheels, it should be a 1917 model, but is that a tapered leaf front spring I see.
The stripe is consistent with Tarrant's practise at the time.

For your interest.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Saturday, January 05, 2013 - 11:54 am:

Rick,

I took this years ago ....

It is on my * Humor From The Road * webpage
featuring pictures I took of funny (to me) things

I need to take some new funny pictures ..... :-)



Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Sunday, January 06, 2013 - 03:45 am:

According to the Trove listing, The lower photo- car No. 27304 with the nicely rounded body and the vacuum tank, is the Palm. Thanks Allan, seems that you are correct.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 03:32 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, January 07, 2013 - 03:54 pm:

Mebbe this will remind Dick Lodge of the Saint Louis tornado pix he posted a few years back:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 04:06 pm:

Here's another photo for a great thread!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 05:03 pm:

Please pardon me if I don't get it, can someone please explain the attraction of these photos? All I see in each one is at minimum a financial tragedy and for some a personal tragedy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 05:27 pm:

Before the T, Model K accidents were numerous. I've found many accounts of accidents, and this one is the most serious. Within days, this Model K Roadster was involved in the death of five victims. Initially at a track race the Model K struck and killed another mechanic.

Then, after an evening of drinking, the owner, Al Marksheffel drove the car at high speed in the mountains outside of Colorado Springs. He had seven or eight passengers. The car went out of control, killing three immediately, with a fourth passenger dying of injuries from the accident.

The driver was also (in)famous, and newspapers throughout the country carried the story:



An excerpt about the Model K accident from the book, "The Love Pirate and the Bandits Son" by Laura James. The book covers the scandalous life of a woman the driver of the Model K later marries, and her eventual husband, Jesse James Jr.



The story carried by "the Spanish Fork (NM), Sept 19 1907:



More on the story:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/isp5mnm7apwy1wu/An%20Infamous%20Ford%20Six%20Forty%20%281%29.pdf


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Morsher on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 08:34 pm:

A follow up news account stated the driver was doing 56 MPH, when a wheel collapsed. It appears a previous owner pumped devcon epoxy into the wheel hub as a hokey band aid repair.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 08:54 pm:

When I look at these photos I can't help but feel I am looking at the vehicle of some poor soul's demise and left wondering what he thought in his last moment as he watched the approach of his imminent doom. Was he resigned to his fate? Surprised? Pissed, or terror stricken. Was the end fast or painfully slow... We should consider these things before viewing these tragic photos as a source of entertainment. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 09:06 pm:

I could post a picture of the fatal touring accident in Kanab but have second thoughts. I hope there is an in depth investigation and the results are posted for everyone to learn.

You have wonder how many people were killed and injured in some of those photos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 09:16 pm:

Gene, the accidents I've found that made headlines "in the day" usually involved reckless behavior. With the Model Ks, it seems excessive speed was frequently the problem.

Tim, I've finished the second wheel now. When rolling across the shop floor, they no longer click and creak. Hopefully that has solved the problem.

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 11:01 am:

Jim, A source of entertainment??

If anything after viewing these historical photos it gives you a healthy respect that we should all have for just how fragile these 85 plus year old cars are, especially competing on the road in today's world!! After all, these cars were near new in the photos and these things happened to them without the decades of metal fatigue and rot our cars have picked up along the way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 11:19 am:

I agree Jay. I'll bet many of us have more experience driving Model T's than the folks driving them as everyday transportation back in the day and most of us are more aware of the Model T's shortcomings and dangers than the folks back then, such as their poor braking power and inability to stop during emergencies and the dangers of original plate glass, so it is no wonder that there are so many terrible accident photos.

Perhaps entertainment was a poor word choice and I apologize to anyone who took offense. It's just that, with the photos being in black and white, it's easy to lose sight of the human tragedies surrounding most of these photos, as we ponder them. If they were in color, the red fluid dripping from the broken glass shards, the seats and the hood would be a vivid reminder that people were terribly injured or died. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 02:16 pm:

Ron H's early newspaper add says it all. "Mangled beyond recognition".
The old saying 'A piece of tin and a piece of board put it together and you have a Ford' really makes one think of the people in the cars when wrecks occurred in the early days of automobiles!
Great pics and information. Very interesting!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 05:57 pm:

Despite the tragedy of these accidents, the photos sometimes do reveal details of the cars themselves that you don't normally see. Under carriage views, Upholstery details etc. Always interesting and a glimpse into the reality of the early automotive years.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 06:57 pm:

I read about people routinely driving 55 MPH in their Model T. I still don't recommend that sort of thing - it doesn't end well, ever.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 07:08 pm:

Good point Royce. My Touring and I are quite happy at 35 mph. We can stay out of traffic here in Idaho most of the time. I know of some folks and cars that do well at 55 and faster. Their reflexes and skill are certainly better than mine.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 07:16 pm:

I agree, Royce and Richard. The T just wasn't designed for such speed. Even with after market brakes, the suspension and steering systems were not intended for a hard stop from 55+ MPH, not to mention a whole host of other modern safety features that are absent in a T. Furthermore, IMHO cars that are modified to properly accommodate such speed aren't T's anymore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 07:24 pm:

Henry,

I don't think its a bad idea to modify a Model T to produce more power. That power can be very helpful when you have four people on board and a steep hill. None of my Model T's are unmodified, although I prefer modifications that cannot be seen, while maintaining 100% of the original functionality of the car.

A stock Model T can easily go 50 MPH or more on level ground if it is in good condition. There's no reason to modify for more speed - the cars are less safe the faster you go. An accident that might be survivable at 25 is fatal at 45.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 07:54 pm:

Richard, I don't think reflexes have anything to do with it. One can have the reflexes of a cat, but if the car won't respond to those lightning fast reflexes, they are useless. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 08:06 pm:

Royce,

I wasn't talking about power. I was talking about speed. The modifications I was thinking of had to do with chassis, steering system, suspension, and brakes. Just because a mostly stock T will go 60 MPH doesn't mean it should go 60 MPH.

Jim Patrick has the essence of what I was trying to say, only he said it better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 08:13 pm:

I'm guessing I've driven some 50,000 to 60,000 miles in my T's over the last 46 years. My Speedster would do over 60. I've never been in or seen a T accident. Maybe saying that is asking for trouble. But if you add up all the miles all of us have driven in T's, the accidents are very few. Yes we have to do everything we can to be safe. Especially with so many other people on the road with cell phones and other distractions. Two factors I can control are speed and traffic. It is good to discuss our responsibilities and safety concerns here on the forum.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 08:51 am:

Roads are so much better now + less need for night driving plus much much better knowledge about the dangers of drinking and driving could be a few of the reasons that makes T accidents fewer nowadays..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d43g8unp7Wk


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 10:51 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 10:52 am:

The quality of the roads may be better, but the traffic is also much faster and drivers more reckless, distracted and unsafe than ever before. At least back in the day, the traffic was much slower, so there was less chance of being rear ended by a car going 75 or 80. I think one reason there are fewer T accidents is because we are more knowledgeable about the maintenance required for our T's and take much better care of them than they did back then. As soon as there is a problem such as slipping bands or a knock or unusual sound, or clicking spokes, we ground our T's and fix the problem because failure to do so could mean disaster. We are fortunate to have the Forum and its' vast source of knowledge at our fingertips as well as the many videos and books available to us, that were not available back then. Back then, they didn't really know the limitations of the Model T, or what to listen for and even if they did, did not have the mechanical ability or money to fix the problem, so they just kept going until something broke or there was a catastrophic failure.

As for me, fear and distrust are the 2 main factors that keep me off the main highways and busy roads and from driving at night. Fear and distrust of the inattentive reckless and speeding drivers who pay more attention to the distractions inside his or her car than what is going on outside the car. I have actually seen drivers reading the newspaper while driving and it is commonplace to see women applying makeup, or young drivers sorting through their CD's looking for a song, or the worst culprit of all, reading and/or sending texts over the phone which may take the attention of the driver off the road for 10 seconds at a time which, at 70 mph can cause the car to travel 102.7 feet per second or 1/5 mile, or the length of 3 1/2 football fields. More than enough time to wipe out a caravan of slow moving Model T's. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 12:44 pm:

Roger,

I agree, better roads (including engineering curves and slope/grade) have improved safety. The major concern I have is the texting driver who keeps it between the lanes, but isn't really focused on things such as our slow moving cars.

One of the things I recall from my days as a traffic cop (long ago) was a driver safety class where the instructor explained that we as drivers are looking for specific "types" of traffic, modern cars.

We don't often see (notice) out of the ordinary traffic, such as motorcycles, slow moving vehicles (farm tractors, our old cars, etc) and pedestrians along highways. Why, because we've conditioned our brains to watch for one thing on highways, other cars and trucks.

This made sense to me, because I've done double takes where I didn't see a motorcycle approaching an intersection, even though I know I looked. I've also watched drivers approach an intersection, look directly at me (in an antique car) and pull on through the intersection, not really "seeing" me, because that's not what their mind told them to watch for at a highway intersection.

Another Model K fatality. This accident received quite a lot of play in eastern newspapers, apparently because of the scandalous nature of the couple. It paints a horrible picture, and I suspect in some ways the newspapers were playing on the scandal as much as the tragedy (no photo of the wreck).

Columns 1 and 2




Columns 3 and 4



The causes of this accident include racing, excessive speed and poor judgement, and we find the same accidents occur today for the same reasons. The driver was reckless, had too much horsepower for the conditions, and speed contributed. I thought it was interesting that the article covers the scandalous relationship of the husband and wife about as thoroughly as the accident itself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way, Wa. on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 01:44 pm:

Rob
Very good description of drivers awareness,
I've often said that If you have ridden a Bicycle, Motor cycle, or driven an old car you are more aware of seeing them. If not just look out for them. (the other drivers that is.) And cell phones sure don't help now days.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 09:52 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 10:57 pm:

I hope the folks at Hagerty don't frequent this forum....... LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Friday, August 23, 2013 - 12:46 pm:

The bottom most picture is obviously a pre 1926 T. Am I wrong to wonder why the coil box is located in the engine compartment? I thought prior to 1926 the coil box was located in the cab on the opposite side of the firewall with only the contacts protruding into the engine compartment through the firewall, so, why does this T have the coil box in the engine compartment? Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, August 23, 2013 - 01:07 pm:

Probably a replacement engine, Jim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Friday, August 23, 2013 - 01:22 pm:

Since we're still on it, a few more Ford wrecks (six cylinder variety) due to speeding and racing:








Good thing Ralph Nader wasn't around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Friday, August 23, 2013 - 01:56 pm:

It seems that back in these days the descriptions of the injuries were really graphic. These days you wouldn't read about a seriously injured woman having her skull 'laid open and a gaping hole in her side' in Ron's old newspaper clippings.
30-40 MPH is fast enough for me in a Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Friday, August 23, 2013 - 03:32 pm:

Rob,

From all the articles you have found about Model K wrecks. I guess we know where so many of them ended up. Heck, there be a couple hundred more of them if people had not been racing them back in the day.

Amazing stuff.
People had to show off is suppose.

Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Friday, August 23, 2013 - 07:17 pm:

Apparently Ford owners had a "bad reputation" early on, as seen in this 1907 newspaper clip:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable on Friday, August 23, 2013 - 07:52 pm:

Here is one from Victoria Australia who still have far too many level railway crossing.
train wreck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 10:39 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Saturday, August 24, 2013 - 04:47 pm:

Not a T, Probably a Maxwell?

wreck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, August 25, 2013 - 09:53 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Sunday, August 25, 2013 - 12:00 pm:

Another Ford accident (K Roadster). It seems often the family background gets as much press as the accident itself.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, August 26, 2013 - 05:17 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Monday, August 26, 2013 - 06:45 pm:

I used this in the 999 thread, but it's relevant in this one too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, August 27, 2013 - 11:44 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, August 27, 2013 - 12:15 pm:

Water wagon good.Honey wagon not so good.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, August 27, 2013 - 01:06 pm:

Dang Bud. That's disgusting!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - 12:18 am:

http://www.visualnews.com/2012/06/25/vintage-car-wrecks/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - 10:32 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, August 29, 2013 - 02:47 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, August 29, 2013 - 04:13 pm:

Great photo Jay - What makes this one particularly interesting is that the "business end" of the tow truck is visible across the street. Kinda' wish the photographer had stepped a couple steps to the right so that the entire tow truck showed in the photo. Still a great photo though,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, August 29, 2013 - 11:21 pm:

Here's one from Canada.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, August 30, 2013 - 01:24 am:

The late '10s sedan crunched into the T center-door sedan is a Paige.
The brass T looks like it gave it its all against the bigger touring! Maybe a Cadillac 30?
Thanks Jay!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Friday, August 30, 2013 - 06:42 am:

Possibly the first fatality involving a Ford made automobile, occurring April 29th, 1905. The Ford Motor Company Board of Directors discussed this at length for several months. Finally, in January 1906 they settled with the estate, for $800.

FMC also bought an insurance policy for Ford employees driving Ford Motor Company cars as a result of this, with a $5000 claim limit. Things have changed......



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison (Vancouver Washington) on Friday, August 30, 2013 - 11:41 am:

Wayne,

The wreck photo Jay posted is of a '13 or '14 T touring against a 1911 Cadillac "30" Touring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Friday, August 30, 2013 - 11:45 am:

It's a RHD Canadian '14.

Looking at the steering column, I'd bet the driver had some serious injuries.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison (Vancouver Washington) on Friday, August 30, 2013 - 12:04 pm:

Derek,

I don't doubt it.....and I doubt the driver of the '11 Cadillac was feeling much better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, August 30, 2013 - 03:45 pm:

Thanks Clayton P!

I had noticed that the T was a Canadian right hand drive. I wonder if the "side of the road" question was a contributing factor in the accident. With the way that steering column looks, I would doubt the driver survived. The headlamp laying on the ground may be beyond restoration.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Paddison (Vancouver Washington) on Friday, August 30, 2013 - 05:45 pm:

I have the feeling the driver of the T was messed up, but I think the reason the T column looks as it does is due to the body shifting on the frame in the impact.

It appears that the T hit the Cadillac (really hard) at about a 45 degree angle (the front right fender and corner of the car) right between the front fenders of the Cadillac....the almost obliterated right front corner of the car and fairly well intact left side confirm this, as do the Cadillac's fairly intact front fenders.

The impact also caused the T's body mounts to shear, shifting the body forward up to the radiator. The frame did not buckle, not was the engine damaged...as it does not appear on the ground under the car and the driveline appears to still be connected as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, August 31, 2013 - 10:24 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, August 31, 2013 - 12:02 pm:

Never shift gears while over a railroad track! One time I was in a 37 Ford and shifted from first to second while on a track and it stuck in both gears at the same time. I couldn't even push the car! A motorcycle cop saw me and put his front wheel against my rear bumper and was able to push me off the track. Fortunately no train was coming. This would probably not happen in a Model T, but it is not a good idea in any car to shift while on a track.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, September 01, 2013 - 03:46 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, September 02, 2013 - 08:59 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Nichols on Monday, September 02, 2013 - 10:14 pm:

I remember a guy who had an A model woody saying if anything hit him, it'd be a pile of splinters...

I'd not just worry about the brakes at 55, there's all the dynamics and integrity of tires, wheels and suspension to consider. At 55 MPH, one could be pretty occupied keeping control.

Also speed limits were a lot slower. My 1940 Rand tells most all states had highway speed limits of 35-45 MPH, which held into the 1950's.

40, I think would be a fine clip.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Nichols on Monday, September 02, 2013 - 10:28 pm:

I remember a guy who had an A model woody saying if anything hit him, it'd be a pile of splinters...

I'd not just worry about the brakes at 55, there's all the dynamics and integrity of tires, wheels and suspension to consider. At 55 MPH, one could be pretty occupied keeping control.

Also speed limits were a lot slower. My 1940 Rand tells most all states had highway speed limits of 35-45 MPH, which held into the 1950's.

40, I think would be a fine clip.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, September 06, 2013 - 10:37 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, September 09, 2013 - 10:49 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, September 10, 2013 - 11:35 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 02:28 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Friday, September 13, 2013 - 04:41 pm:

What sharpness in the old pictures.
What sharpness in the old pictures.
Maybe not the drivers had it. It certainly did hurt these cars.
Ake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, September 14, 2013 - 09:27 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, September 14, 2013 - 10:24 am:

I think i have seen the picture before of what i think is the Itala setting at the railroad dock in Cheyenne Wy?? The Itala was hit by a train and forced to retire from the 1909 New York to Seattle Race.Bud. Sometimes the facts in [The Story Of The Race]get lost as it was a Ford pr book! Bud??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, September 15, 2013 - 10:35 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, September 16, 2013 - 12:58 am:

Jay's pic makes me think of this mural in downtown Anacortes:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, September 18, 2013 - 11:05 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Thursday, September 19, 2013 - 12:38 am:

Look at that axle, and the hickory spokes are still intact.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, September 19, 2013 - 12:52 am:

I keep saying it. I like wood wheels. I trust wood wheels.
Thank you, Ralph for pointing that out. I have seen this photo before and cannot for the life of me figure out how they got that car there. Maybe they dug the trench while the car was parked. The trench braces look just like ones we used to use.
Thank you Jay for all the photos you keep adding! I have been enjoying them a lot.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, September 20, 2013 - 09:07 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Saturday, September 21, 2013 - 10:30 am:

Hard to believe, but not only the driver survive this wreck, he ran back to the pit, jumped in another car, and continued on with the race.

This was all that was left of a 50 horsepower Pope Toledo following the wreck during the 1907 24 hours endurance race at the Michigan State Fairgrounds. Herbert Lytle, the driver, was a well known race car driver and held many records during his career.

This is the race the Ford Model K won, setting a world record for miles traveled in a 24 hour period (1135).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, September 22, 2013 - 10:36 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, September 22, 2013 - 10:39 am:

That might be an Auto Ambulance under that front axle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lance Sorenson, Hector, Minnesota on Sunday, September 22, 2013 - 07:07 pm:

I hope these cars where all AETNA-IZED.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, September 23, 2013 - 10:49 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Geisler on Saturday, September 28, 2013 - 12:10 am:

Ask Don Lewis (mid Florida)about getting hit in the rear by a driver of a newer car!!!! He was with another couple in his 16 touring when they got hit pretty hard. Thank goodness a T is not a heavy car. He did rebuild the T though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, September 28, 2013 - 10:41 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, September 29, 2013 - 11:05 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Monday, September 30, 2013 - 08:02 am:

Had forgotten this one. Be careful, ya' hear?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Monday, September 30, 2013 - 09:34 am:

This photo is difficult to see, but shows the bottom of the Ford six cylinder motor after wrecking on Oct 18, 1907. Ford's chief race car driver was severely injured and Henry Ford claimed FoMoCo would not race again.



This racer still exists and is at The Henry Ford museum, although not currently on display. Also seen in the photo (upper left, looks like the journal of a crankshaft) is one of the wire wheel hubs, with no wire spokes remaining. The next account says the racer had borken the one mile circular track record (held by Lewis Strang, at 51.6 mph) prior to the accident. Lewis Strang was later killed in a racing accident.




Just two weeks prior to this, Henry Ford was giving a speed exhibition for Ford agents with the same racer on the same track, clocking a 59 second mile time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, October 02, 2013 - 12:17 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Wednesday, October 02, 2013 - 06:01 am:



Caption- "An overturned motor car on a country road after an accident near Greenock, South Australia"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, October 03, 2013 - 10:54 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, October 04, 2013 - 08:07 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, October 05, 2013 - 11:26 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, October 12, 2013 - 09:06 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Sunday, October 13, 2013 - 11:45 am:

It is kind of amazing that in all but two of these pictures the bodies stayed attached to the frame, so the next time the seat belt discussion comes up the idea that the bodies will come off in a collision can be eliminated.The two that were destroyed were hit by trains.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Olsen on Sunday, October 13, 2013 - 11:59 am:

I thought the issue with seat belts is getting crushed in a rollover. Well, that is mine at least. The thing for me to do would look at the likelihood of a rollover in an average accident. Then weigh that data, and make my choice.
As Hal would say:
respectfully submitted


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, October 13, 2013 - 11:59 am:

Sharp eye there, Rick. I don't take any chances; my belts are anchored just to the seat, so we go where the seat goes, kinda' like an ejection seat in a fighter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Sunday, October 13, 2013 - 12:05 pm:

Chris, no question about rollovers, it is just a statement that comes up in the discussion about seat belts that the bodies come off the frame so that anchoring to the frame is bad because the body comes off, it is up to the individual to decide, not someone on this forum.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ricks - Surf City on Sunday, October 13, 2013 - 12:32 pm:

People naturally tend to compare antique open cars to moderns when it comes to safety. I say a better comparison is to motorcycles, and I think the T is safer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Olsen on Sunday, October 13, 2013 - 12:39 pm:

Rick--exactly. My T project is replacing my old Ruskie sidehack. I'll drive it about the same.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, October 16, 2013 - 11:13 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, October 21, 2013 - 08:37 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 - 12:16 am:

Classic T "wreck" in living grey tones..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0_QE2pBd8c#t=23


Buster Keaton


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 11:17 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, October 31, 2013 - 11:04 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, November 15, 2013 - 10:25 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, November 23, 2013 - 12:08 am:

Q. When's a door not a door?

A. When it's a jar!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Saturday, November 23, 2013 - 03:30 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Friday, December 06, 2013 - 10:32 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Friday, December 06, 2013 - 10:44 am:

These are awful. I suspect an alarmingly high percentage of folks involved in these accidents were either killed or maimed for life.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, December 21, 2013 - 12:09 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, December 21, 2013 - 02:58 pm:

Seth,
I am sure that more than a couple of these, you are right. However, people survived these wrecks more than you might think.
Two points to consider. One is, most of these wrecks occurred at what we would consider low speeds. Most people in those days never drove much over 25 mph. I used to ride a bicycle faster than that. And I was thrown off onto pavement several times over the years (I rode fast and hard).
Second, is that these cars crumple quickly in a collision. The frame twists easily, as do the fenders. The car can actually look a lot worse than it really is. I have known of several accidents, both minor and serious. Injuries were not as bad as could have been expected, and the cars repaired. Even a good friend's '12 touring was fully restored after a speeding big-rig slammed into it.

Jay,
That last fellow seems to be contemplating "Where to start?" However, one never knows.
Drive carefully, and enjoy the Christmas holidays! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 - 11:49 am:

One last gasp posting to this thread.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, January 07, 2014 - 09:52 pm:

Squeezing another one in here.


The Tree Won!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Wednesday, January 08, 2014 - 09:04 am:



Sounds like an accident recreation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Hycner on Saturday, March 08, 2014 - 09:08 am:


Here are a couple T wrecks that I found on the Buffalo NY heritage page.


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