Old Photo - Bucking Ford Smiths

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Old Photo - Bucking Ford Smiths
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, January 01, 2014 - 10:53 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, January 01, 2014 - 11:06 am:

Every body must have known them in Frankfort. Imagine just giving your town as contact information today!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, January 02, 2014 - 11:01 am:

You can still do that a lot of places today, Charlie, it's just a matter where you live. We have lots of names and addresses on our mailing lists for auctions that are just a name and a town, no box, no street, nothing. Bear in mind that the smallest county in Montana has slightly over 700 people in the entire county. Yes, 7 Hundred. The best address in Montana IMHO is still "Powderville Stage, Ismay, Montana" The mail route is over 100 miles and there are maybe 25 customers on it. Several years ago the government gave everybody an address but nobody uses it. It's still just Powderville Stage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Scott Owens on Thursday, January 02, 2014 - 12:29 pm:

My cousin borrowed a little money from out grandmother to buy a car. She would mail her a check every month to Grandmommie Tipton calif. My grandmother got the check every month and she lived 6 miles out of town on a ranch. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Thursday, January 02, 2014 - 08:09 pm:

i could add that to list of requirements when i move after retirement. one is a state with no professional sports, 2 is it should be a hundred miles to the mall, and now 3 would someplace with no address!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Friday, January 03, 2014 - 03:06 am:

Hey Clayton,
You need to think long and hard before making such a move, we have had many people move into our area for the same reason, and they get upset when the roads are not cleared after a storm, in our area, the priority is pregnant women, dairies and emergencies. It is amazing how many people think running out of cigarettes is an emergency. The first thing most of these transplants want to do is change our community to be more like the one they escaped, and most are disliked by the locals for this reason.
That being said, we did have a couple who moved here from the PRK and made a concerted effort to be part of the existing community with out trying to change it. I have nothing in common with the husband, but because of his efforts to be part of the community, we helped the community stage a re enactment of the local 4th of July parade in front of their house because his wife was ill and they could not drive to town for the celebration.
On the other side of the issue, another couple moved into an area near here and quickly announced to the local farmers that he was allergic to Diesel exhaust, and they should not drive their tractors near his property. We have also had newcomers complain about noise at night from farm work and dust, and if you move to a remote area and put up "keep out" signs, do not expect to be welcomed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Friday, January 03, 2014 - 10:13 am:

gustaf, all good points i am aware of. i am 35 miles from a big city, mpls mn. and when i bought the place in 1977 i lived in the country. if we had a big storm you may not see the plow for 3 days. it was fun actually, all the neighbors new each other,all were home we would share supplys and cheer when the road was opened. i was about the only one not a farmer, and now many farms are gone. the city is not at my door yet but in ten more years it may be. i'm on a gravel road, used to be only a few cars all day and you knew them all, now traffic all day and i dont know most. i hate to sound like i need to hide from society, but much prefer the small town simple life. small towns near me are not small towns any more! i have spent much time traveling out west where 5 miles to the neighbors is not uncommon, and little towns dot the map. trouble is, you need to bring your money with you, and at present, thats in short supply!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, January 03, 2014 - 11:25 am:

We have a lot of that here, too. People move here from Califunny to get away from Califunny and want us to become just like them. The subdivision across the road from me is named "Menlo Park." "Pondera" in Montana is pronounced "Pon der AAAA," after the Pen D'Oriel lakes which are named after the French expedition, etc. At a homeowner's meeting a few years ago the president of the HA pronounced it Pon DARE a. I pointed out the correct pronunciation to him and he informed me that those on the street from California preferred their pronunciation, not the "Archaic" one used in Montana.

We get people who think every road should be plowed, nobody should have farm machinery, etc., but we also get a lot of nice people who are here because they want to be and who fit right in.

Clayton, the reality is this: There is a lot of money here and in most of those small towns -- at least in the Dakotas and Montana. You just need to figure out how to make money and get by the way they do. Most people don't want to move to a small out of the way town where houses are cheap and the cost of living is pretty low, they want to move to a popular small town with expensive houses and bigger town amenities and close to a big town and then want every thing to be cheaper because it is a small town.

One of the rude awakenings for a lot of people who move here is that people here tend to not show off their money. The guy in faded overalls and boots with run down heels sitting at the cafe eating breakfast with the town drunk or poorest guy in town may be a multi millionaire who called his broker before he came in to town for breakfast. (think -- my multi gazillionaire brother in law who every year for the last 40 years gets a new pair of John Deere suspenders for Christmas) If you saw him at the cafe you'd think you should buy this old guy's breakfast for him so he could save his money to eat on tomorrow.

As my sister says, "So, you have a $60,000 BMW you are making payments on?? I wrote a check for half a million for a new combine last fall and I'm supposed to be in awe of your wealth???" Don't think so.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Friday, January 03, 2014 - 11:54 am:

yea stan its true, folks move out here to the country and then wonder why we have no street lights, no paved road, and the same schools as they had in the city. its all more taxes. i'm on the edge of the metropolitan area so my taxes are double what it is 2 miles away in the next county. my high taxes pay for the new light rail i will never ride, the new football stadium i will never see, and feed all the people who supposedly cant get a job but live in a nicer house and drive a nicer car than me. my township had to put up road sighs a few years back so if you drive off the corner you cant sue us. go west young man, go west. california has bought the west slope of montana so cant afford that any more, go too far east and you get a north dakota winter, the nebraska sand hills are nice, not sure where mayberry is or i'd allready be packing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, January 03, 2014 - 12:30 pm:

When Arkansas City threatened to annex our area the mayor said, "We'll bring you amenities." I told her, "I do not want amenities inflicted upon me." So we incorporated and became a city (Parkerfield) in order to stay country.

There are places where population growth is really a shift in distribution. I think the population of this county is about the same as it was a hundred years ago. But the two main towns, Winfield and Arkansas City, have grown considerably. Meanwhile, places like Silverdale and Geuda Springs, which once had their own banks, hotels, and stores, have shrunk to a few houses. In Cloverdale, where my dad was born, the last store closed in 1945. I think there are now three houses there. It's the same for the rest of Kansas and much of this part of the country. Cities and larger towns grow, and the little towns fade. It's the Henry Ford effect.


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