OT - Pip Squeek competitor to the Model T - The Hupmobile Twenty – “Guaranteed For Life”

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT - Pip Squeek competitor to the Model T - The Hupmobile Twenty – “Guaranteed For Life”
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Friday, January 03, 2014 - 11:16 am:




The Hupmobile Twenty – “Guaranteed For Life”: This cute little Hupp was a hit right out of the box for Robert and Louis Hupp after

they entered the light car market in 1909. We have a post filled with many more photos and information about the attractive and

capable car that even completed a 48,000 mile around the world journey. Learn and see more @ http://theoldmotor.com/?p=110385


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Smiley on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 11:16 am:

I tried to contact the Hupp Motor Car Company to order a couple of them but it seems like they may have moved or something w/no forwarding address.
Any suggestions on how to contact them?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 01:09 pm:

Wasn't a 1919 Hupmobile touring car the auto pictured on the previous $10 bill?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 01:10 pm:

You might try where Bobby worked before Hupmobile - at the Piquette Plant in Detroit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 01:20 pm:

Henry,I always thought that was a model A Ford? Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 01:27 pm:

Bud,
I can't remember where I heard or read it, but I've believed it was a Hupmobile for years. I could easily be wrong. I don't have an old $10 bill to look at right now (broke as usual :-)), but as I recall it looked to be an earlier vintage car than a Model A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 01:42 pm:

Wow, I learned something new today, I had no idea there used to be a car picture on the old $10.00 bill! Can someone post a picture of an old bill?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 01:43 pm:

A friend in town had a beautiful little red 1909 Huppmobile like the one pictured... not the similar ones with the tall radiator filler neck. It was purchased out of the Pollard collection and restored by a local friend of mine.

The owner was a member of the HCCA and she drove it on a tour or two but then sold it. It seems that it changed lanes whenever she looked over her shoulder to check traffic. She disliked finding herself suddenly in the path of overtaking vehicles... go figure!

The engine casting was really unique, it looked like a sewer pipe with cylinders stuck on the top.

A really cute little automobile.

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 01:51 pm:

I found a picture of the old ten dollar bill on (gasp) Wikipedia, here it is:

ten_dollar

Here is a closeup of the car, what brand is it?

car01


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 02:10 pm:

Here is a detail from the Series 1953 Ten Dollar Bill.

ten dollar bill detail


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 03:53 pm:

Maybe you're right Bud. Looking at the pictures posted above it could be a Model A after all. There are sources out there via Google that say it's a Ford Model A, Hupmobile, and that it's not any specific car at all.

Now I won't sleep for a week......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 03:59 pm:

Thanks for posting the picture of the $10 bill. It takes me down memory lane. I haven't seen any money since I've been married.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Karl Gilchrist on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 04:14 pm:

They are a great car I love my 1910 and drive it lots but my 1913 T is definitely easier to keep running. Basically any part needed for the Hupmobile needs to be fabricated. Recently we overhauled the engine and gearbox and ended up fabricating Crankshaft and camshaft gears , a camshaft and several gearbox gears. Ouch!

1910 Hupmobile


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 04:48 pm:

This makes me want a hupmoble now. Guess i will have to buy a 3D printer & make one. Anyone know where i can download the plans?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 05:59 pm:

Mark,
Cool picture of a Hamilton bill. Look at that serial number... A00000001A

Wow, how rare is that? I bet that bill would be worth almost $10 today!

:^)

Karl, is that a model T windshield on your Hupp? You have the high filler I was mentioning.

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Karl Gilchrist on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 06:55 pm:

Terry No I think it is original Hupp. The high radiator become a design feature of the early Hupps for a number of years . However there are markedly simialer features between the early Hupp and early Fords . The front mounted radiator is very similar to the NRS set up. The diff insides are almost identical to Model T. I'm not sure if this is because Robert Hupp worked for Ford in the Pre -T days or because Hupp brought in components from the same suppliers as Ford (Bobbie would have had the contacts as he worked as Fords Purchasing officer ) or that's just how they build things in 1908. Probably a combination of all three!

By report when Henry saw the first Hupp prototype he said "If we can build a car as good as Bobbies we'll be doing very well"

Here are a couple of photos under the hood I have just taken -Ignore the NH its non original. I have the original Breeze carburetor which Stan Howe is about to work his magic on. The original inlet manifold has been butchered to accomodate the NH but I have obtained the most amazing casting done by someone Stateside of an original inlet manifold which I will use when I get the breeze back Hupp Engine


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Karl Gilchrist on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 06:57 pm:

Whoops I meant front mounted flywheel and fan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Saturday, January 04, 2014 - 08:55 pm:

According to the U.S. Treasury Department:

"The engraved die of the Treasury Building vignette was completed in the early part of December 1927. The engraver was Louis S. Schofield. There are four cars included in this vignette. These cars are of no specific make or model and each one is a creation of the designer who prepared the original model which was later used by Mr. Schofield when he made the original hand-engraved die of this vignette."

Read more: The $10 Bill | Infoplease.com http://www.infoplease.com/askeds/$10-bill.html#ixzz2pU4K2sdn


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marc Johnson Helotes TX on Sunday, January 05, 2014 - 11:33 am:

Model 20 Hupp Photos

Ya'll are right about making parts for the 20's. This is Sonny's 1910. 50's Dodge Pistons,with Model T Piston bushings. Egge wanted $550 or so a set. $19 each from Kanter. I love Hupp's.I learned to drive in a 1922 Model R on the farm.

Marc


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Sunday, January 05, 2014 - 12:07 pm:



Here are two images from an article in the October 27, 1909 Horseless Age that were not used in our post on the Model 20.

The design of the camshaft, lifter and magneto assembly was quite interesting. Not having rebuilt one yet, we thought it was
interesting how the crankcase side cover served double duty for this purpose.

It appears to have have made the casting and pattern work and the machining when it was being manufactured, much quicker
and less costly to do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, January 05, 2014 - 01:14 pm:

Henry,Well the December 1927 time frame is right for the model A. When introduced in Dec of 27 the car that was to replace the Model T was instantly famous!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Sunday, January 05, 2014 - 01:24 pm:

The Hudson guys will swear it's a '27 Hudson.
Jim Thode's post makes more sense though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison on Sunday, January 05, 2014 - 05:26 pm:

The Hupmobile torpedo postcard David posted is new to me. I have this model, which was only made in 1911. The color was invented by the postcard printer. It was only sold in a dark blue. Also, the electric headlamps are interesting, as Hupp never used these on this model, as far as I know.

My intake manifold was also butchered, Karl. Can you tell me where you got yours?

Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Karl Gilchrist on Monday, January 06, 2014 - 02:59 am:

David the camshaft sideplate may look interesting but its a real pain. To replace the end gear you have to remove the camshaft from the plate The camshaft runs in white metal " bearings". To reinstall the cam is the pain. What you do is set the camshaft up in the correct position (in itself a fiddle) and then pour molten babbit into the recesses round the cam producing the "bearings" The trick is to get clearance round the cam for oiling -What we did was wrapped the cam on its bearing surfaces with one layer of newspaper which carbonates when the babbit is poured leaving a gap for the oil to get into


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Greenlees on Monday, January 06, 2014 - 09:10 am:

Karl,

Thanks for the rundown....It sounds like what I initially thought, it was done to build it quicker and at less cost.

It does in fact appear to be a big service headache. Maybe Hupp offered the assembly for service work at the time?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marc Johnson Helotes TX on Monday, January 06, 2014 - 03:21 pm:

Karl
Thanks for the hint on pouring the Cam Bearings using a newspaper wrap.
The one I did was just fine but it would have been a real pain to redo.

Marc


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 12:21 pm:

Karl,
I really like your little Model 20 !! We need to trade windshields though. You have the last year of brass radiators (1910) and my Model 20 (1911) is the first year of steel shell radiator and I found a brass windshield and mounted it. The only downside to the little Hupp is 16.9 H.P using a 4:1 ring/pinion. It'll climb well but top end is limited. Marc did a real good job on the engine, tho.


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