Steering Gear Case Rod Tabs

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Steering Gear Case Rod Tabs
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 03:01 pm:

What is the best method to open the rod tabs on the steering gear case? Should I heat them before hand?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT BERGSTADT on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 03:12 pm:

Screwdriver, they are brass, Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 03:22 pm:

Go very slowly so you don't break them off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 03:32 pm:

You only get ONE chance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By BRENT MIZE on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 03:49 pm:

Adam,
I would anneal them first, otherwise they are most likely going to break. Don't ask me how I know!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 04:38 pm:

Annealing them may help. To anneal brass, heat to red hot and quench on cold water.

If you do break them, it is not a big deal. You can easily add a bushing/sleeve between the clips to hold the spark and throttle shafts in place. I did that on mine and it worked great. Just make or find a bushing that just fits over the shaft and will fit inside the steering column. Cut the bushing just long enough to fit between the broken clips.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 07:01 pm:

Thanks for all the help guys. I will get the rivets out and see what I can get done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 07:34 pm:

The quench is only necessary if you want to handle it right away. It has no function in the anneal process. And mind the heat--Just red is hot enough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 08:08 pm:

Ken. I am confused ... That happens to me a lot anymore. I thought to anneal steel or cast iron ductile ect you heat it up and cool slowly. To anneal copper, or brass you heat it up and cool quickly. I have always thought they are opposite of each other ... To "temper" would be a whole different discussion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Thursday, January 09, 2014 - 09:00 pm:

Copper (and its alloys) can't be heat treated they harden by internal stress or "working" the metal. The heating relieves the stresses and cooling after that, slow or fast, has no affect on its hardness.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 10:26 am:

While you have the rods out, get them plated about 3 inches below the bend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 08:36 pm:

Larry, I purchased a set of Stainless steel rods. Do people still plate the ends of the stainless steel or just leave it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 09:02 pm:

Adam,
You could plate the stainless steel but I suspect that most folks do not. I left mine bare SS.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 04:53 am:

Adam, there is no need to plate the stainless steel rods. When polished, they are almost identical to nickel plating, plus they never wear through. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 12:26 am:

I agree with Ken that quenching does nothing. It is the heating of the copper alloys that softens them and in fact if you watch you can actually watch the metal change and advance the annealed portion by pushing it along with the torch. One way to make sure you don't get it too hot is to do it at night in the shop with the lights off other than the torch. Just heat the brass till its just cherry red in the darkened room and you won't get it too hot. Doing it in bright light can make you get the brass very hot before you see it is reddish and that can be a disaster. Also keep the torch away from the surface since if you happen to accidentally touch the torch to the metal surface it can leave a really bad blemish. Been there - done that - ruined some things while learning.


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