Magnents vs oil slingers

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Magnents vs oil slingers
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim B Boyer on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 02:54 pm:

To you folks who have removed the magnets from your flywheel and installed the oil slingers the vendors supply in there place, how do you feel about them? Do they supply enough oil or do they leave something to be desired? Thanks in advance for any input.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Hood on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 03:09 pm:

I have a touring car that has had the magnets removed, and oil slingers installed. I think I have plenty of oil supply, however I don't see any advantage to removing the magnets unless you are racing and need an engine that will rev quickly and to a high rpm. I do see a disadvantage though. I have two heavy vehicles, a Fordor sedan, and a truck body, that both still have their magnets installed. That extra mass on the flywheel helps keep the engines in these cars running. In both of these cars, I can pretty much just stomp the low pedal down and go. The inertia of those heavy flywheels just starts the car moving without stalling the engine. However the touring without the magnets is fairly easy to stall. I have to feather the pedal a little, get the car rolling, before I can push the pedal fully down.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 03:12 pm:

I have a set on one of our cars and they seem to work great.
Pumps a lot of oil through the outside oiler.
Another benefit...seems to me that the engine slows down faster when you let up on the gas because of the lighter flywheel. This makes it an easier and smoother shift.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 03:15 pm:

Jeff,
We were typing at the same time.
I agree that it seems to stall easier...never thought about that before.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 04:35 pm:

I have a Fordor with magnets and a Coupe with slingers, the one with magnets seems to lug a little better while the one with slingers has a little more get up they both work well, i have had a slinger come off or loose and broke the nose off the starter and flattened the other slingers so it was a easy fix, the one with magnets came apart and the magnets came out through the hogshead, destroyed the mag ring and punched a hole in the pan. The slinger will move a tremendous amount of oil as will the magnets, so you decide.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 05:53 pm:

Neither one should come loose if installed properly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester W. Lowery TN on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 05:54 pm:

Jim,
My present T is the only one I have owned so I'm not experienced enough to even comment on most any subject on this forum...But when my engine was being built by a real T enthusiast and engine builder I was informed when I purchased the slingers that are supplied by the vendors to check the welds and probably add some extra weld to them....Why I thought about this is when I read about Rick's slinger coming off....This must have happened to several car owners when they have chosen to go with slingers....Just a suggestion passed from one to another.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 06:55 pm:

Both of my speedsters have slingers to do the oiling job of the magnets while greatly reducing turning wt. I agree with the above folks--magnets are better on "normal" T's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Friday, January 10, 2014 - 09:36 pm:

I have a hopped up engine with slingers that runs as quiet as a church mouse. To me it is more the reduction of spinning weigh of the magnets on the flywheel and thus the crankshaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 12:37 am:

If you run a large outside oil line and pick up like what Texas T offers, there is no need for slingers if the magnets have been removed.

We know what happens if a magnet or slinger breaks or comes loose. That has been documented and discussed on this forum before.

The flywheel does not need magnets or slingers to provide sufficient oil up front....Provided you install an outside line kit as described in my first sentence.
The mag post oilers are only 1/4" and are prone to plugging like the internal stock oil line.

On our 13 T touring, I have been running with no magnets or slingers for 14 yrs. with no bearing problems or adjustments. As part of the rebuild 14 yrs. ago, I installed a large oil pickup in the hogs head coupled with a 1/2" outside Oil line to a fitting that is brazed in the pan opposite #1 rod. I also have used synthetic oil after the first oil change.

Just sharing my experience and that of several friends who are running this same set up. One good friend who was very skeptical about removing the slingers in his car (Which I talked him in to doing) placed a clear plastic tube in the 1/2" oil line so he could see how much oil was flowing. He no longer questions if the Texas HV outside oiler is doing the job....seeing is believing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Art Wilson on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 01:25 am:

Contrary to the opinion of many folks, additional slingers are not needed and also are known to fail.
There are 16 bolt heads on the flywheel along with all the teeth on the starter ring gear that are slinging plenty of oil.
What is important is getting the oil to the front of the engine. The outside oil line that Les described does a great job doing that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 05:42 am:

I am putting an engine together right now, some one long ago removed the mag and nicely riveted the ring gear back in place. I am just going to keep it this way and get the t parts hv oiler, add some dippers to the rods and drill the caps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 08:01 am:

I also thought oil slingers and magnets were unneeded when a Horlick/Texas T style oiler was added. Then Chris posted last april about his friends experience wearing out the triple gear bushings twice in short order even with careful fitting when running without any slingers.. so maybe slingers are needed for the lubrication of the transmission, not for the engine?
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/355193.html?1366510858


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William A. Reep III on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 03:18 pm:

This may be overkill, but I put eight slingers on my '24 roadster. I didn't like that all the bolt holes weren't filled. Also added two auxillary inside oil lines along with the large funnel Ford one plus outside oil line. Drove quite a bit last summer so far all is good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 04:23 pm:

What Les omits in his statements that oil slingers are not required, is that he uses Mobil One oil. After this oil has been in the engine for a while, it can probably run with no oil for many miles. While I have seen Les's car run, I still would not build an engine without either magnets or Texas T oil slingers. JMHO


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester W. Lowery TN on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 04:58 pm:

Jim, here are a few pictures I found when we were in the process of building mine....hope this may help a little....we routed the oil to the center of the motor and the top of front with stainless steel...I seem to only be able to upload two pic's at a time....so I will post again after this...sorry
oiling systemoiling system


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester W. Lowery TN on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 05:00 pm:

Hers a few more pic's
oiling systemoiling systemoiling system


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester W. Lowery TN on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 05:01 pm:

One more, sorry again
oiling system


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 05:26 pm:

If you're thinking that you can only post two pics at a time because only the first two pics show up when you "preview" the message, and the remaining pics only show up as funny symbols, don't worry, the other pics will show up properly in the final post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 05:53 pm:

Besides that, anyone who posts nice informative pictures has nothing to be sorry about.
We are looking at your pictures with interest Chester.
We are all glad you took the time to post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester W. Lowery TN on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 06:00 pm:

Mark and Aaron,
Thanks for the info...I kept waiting and waiting for the pic's to show up on the preview so I did it the long way.... I'll know next time....I did reduce them to I think around 630 pixels before posting.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve McClelland on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 06:17 pm:

If it's oil movement you want this is what we did on one of our T's we rigged up a troft inside the hogshead starter hole also a block off plate on the back side the troft looked some what like 1/2 of a soup can welded to the outer plate,So we removed the starter installed this troft if you will, we soldered a 5/8 brass flare fitting in the end of it, then on the oil pan at number one sump drilled a hole installed a 5/8 90 degree elbow silver soldered it in place.
next we ran a 5/8 copper line with flare ends and wound up with a heck of an oil delivery system.
Keep in mind we spent a lot of time on valve timing which is the key to a quick easy starting T engine in the first place, so with out doing the valve timing step I don't suggest removing your starter...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 11:10 pm:

Steve, I am interested in what you mean by the valve timing thing. I am always ready to learn something. Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve McClelland on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 04:42 am:

Joseph, here you go .... Sorry for the thread drift guys.


SETTING VALVE CLEARANCE

A SIMPLE PROCEDURE

BY GLEN CHAFFIN

AN ORIGINAL, USED MODEL T FORD CAMSHAFT WILL HAVE REDUCED LIFT AND A CHANGE IN VALVE TIMING CHARACTERISTICS DUE TO NORMAL WEAR ON THE LOBES. EVERY LOBE OF THE CAM WILL HAVE A DIFFERENT WEAR CHARACTERISTIC.
THE ENGINE WILL STILL RUN WELL BUT MAY HAVE A REDUCTION IN OVERALL CAM PERFORMANCE.

BACK IN THE EARLY 1920’S, K.R. WILSON SUGGESTED THAT MODEL T VALVES BE SET USING THE PISTON TRAVEL METHOD. HE EVEN OFFERED A SPECIAL TOOL TO DO THE JOB. THE IDEA WAS TO ADJUST THE OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE VALVES TO CORRESPOND WITH A CERTAIN POSITION OF THE PISTON. IN THEORY THIS WAS A GOOD IDEA AS IT COMPENSATED FOR THE WEAR ON THE CAM LOBES AND RESTORED VALVE TIMING TO THE ORIGINAL FORD SPECIFICATIONS. IN PRACTICE IT CAUSED OTHER PROBLEMS.

MANY ARTICLES HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED IN THE VINTAGE FORD ON HOW TO ADJUST VALVES BY PISTON TRAVEL. HOWEVER, YOU SHOULD KNOW THAT THIS METHOD IS OBSOLETE AND ONLY USEFUL FOR SOMEONE USEING THE ORIGINAL CAST IRON HEAD VALVES AND TRYING TO RESTORE OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE BY ADJUSTING VALVE TIMING TO COMPENSATE FOR A WORN CAMSHAFT. EVERY CAM LOBE HAS A DIFFERENT WEAR PATTERN AND WILL REQUIRE A DIFFERENT ADJUSTMENT TO RESTORE THE ORIGINAL VALVE TIMING. USING THIS METHOD WILL RESULT IN THE VALVE LASH OF EACH VALVE BEING DIFFERENT FROM THE NEXT ONE. WHEN THE PROCEDURE IS COMPLETED TYPICAL VALVE LASH WILL VARY BETWEEN 0.010 IN. AND 0.030 IN. THE NET RESULT WILL BE A MODERATE IMPROVEMENT IN ENGINE PERFORMANCE AT THE EXPENSE OF A VERY NOISY ENGINE.

FORD SET MODEL T VALVE CLEARANCE TO A “THIN DIME”. TYPICALLY, 0.022 TO 0.028 IN. THIS WAS NECESSARY DUE TO THE USE OF CAST IRON HEAD VALVES WHICH HAD A LARGE THERMAL EXPANSION COEFFICIENT. IN TODAYS WORLD ANYONE REBUILDING A MODEL T ENGINE WOULD NOT EVEN THINK OF USING THESE CLEARANCES AND THE POROCEDURE OF SETTING VALVE CLEARANCE BY PISTON TRAVEL IS OBSOLETE. WITH MODERN STAINLESS STEEL VALVES, THE CLEARANCE IS TYPICALLY SET BETWEEN 0.010 IN. AND 0.015 IN. THIS WILL INCREASE VALVE LIFT ABOUT 0.010 IN. AND SLIGHTLY INCREASE VALVE DURATION.

DURATION IS THE TIME DURING WHICH A VALVE IS OPEN MEASURED IN DEGREES OF CAMSHAFT ROTATION. DECREASING VALVE CLEARANCE INCREASES VALVE DURATION. WITH A TYPICAL CAM GRIND, THE VALVE DURATION WILL INCREASE APPROXIMATELY 1 DEGREE FOR EACH 0.001 IN. IN REDUCED CLEARANCE. USING THE NEW RECOMMENDED VALVE CLEARANCE WITH A “STOCK” CAM THE DURATION SHOULD BE INCREASED ABOUT 10 DEGREES TO 228 DEGREES. THE INCREASED LIFT AND DURATION WILL IMPROVE THE ENGINE PERFORMANCE OVER THE ENTIRE OPERATING RANGE OF THE CAM.

MY ORIGINAL 1913 ROADSTER WAS REBUILT USING THE ORIGINAL CAM. THE VALVE LASH WAS SET TO 0.015 IN. FOR EACH VALVE. THE CAM VALVE TIMING WAS THEN MEASURED AND HAD TYPICAL WEAR CHARACTERISTICS. INTAKE VALVE DURATION VARIED BETWEEN 229 AND 243 DEGREES. EXHAUST VALVE DURATION VARIED BETWEEN 222 AND 235 DEGREES. THIS SOUNDS TERRIBLE, BUT IN PRACTICE, THE ENGINE RAN BEAUTIFULLY WITH VERY GOOD LOW END TORQUE AND HORSEPOWER. I HAD NO PROBLEM DRIVING 50 MILES PER HOUR OR PULLING STEEP HILLS IN HIGH GEAR WITHOUT A RUCKSTELL.

THE MODEL T FORD ENGINE IS A MARVELOUS MACHINE AND WILL PERFORM WELL EVEN WITH A WORN CAMSHAFT. HOWEVER, IT IS NOT A MODERN PRECISION RACING MACHINE. THE ENGINE WAS DESIGNED AND PERFORMED WELL FOR IT’S ORIGINAL APPLICATION. THE ENGINE PERFORMANCE CAN BE IMPROVED TODAY BUT STILL HAS IT’S LIMITATIONS.

SETTING VALVE CLEARANCE

A NEW CAMSHAFT IS GROUND TO GIVE THE BEST PERFORMANCE AT A SPECIFIED VALVE CLEARANCE. A USED CAM WILL HAVE SOME ERROR IN IT’S GRIND DUE TO WEAR BUT WILL STILL PERFORM WELL WITH ALL OF THE VALVES SET TO THE SAME CLEARANCE. I KNOW THAT MANY OLD TIMERS WILL DISAGREE, BUT IN PRACTICE THIS IS TRUE, AS DEMONSTRATED BY MY 1913 ROADSTER.

WE THEREFORE RECOMMEND THAT VALVE CLEARANCE BE SET THE SAME FOR EACH VALVE WHETHER THE CAM IS A NEW CAM OR AN ORIGINAL WITH MODERATE WEAR. THE AVERAGE MODEL T DRIVER WILL NOT BE ABLE TO TELL THE DIFFERENCE IN PERFORMANCE AND THE ENGINE WILL RUN QUIET. HOWEVER, THERE ARE ALWAYS EXCEPTIONS TO EVERY RULE!

SETTING VALVE CLEARANCE NEED NOT BE A DIFFICULT CHORE IF YOU KNOW WHAT TO DO. FIRST, BASED ON WHAT YOU KNOW ABOUT THE CAM, CHOOSE A CLEARANCE BEST SUITED FOR THAT CAM. ANYTHING BETWEEN 0.010 IN AND 0.015 IN. SHOULD WORK.

THE CAM GEAR HAS 48 TEETH. THE CRANK GEAR HAS 24 TEETH. THIS MEANS THAT THE CAM GEAR TURNS AT ONE HALF THE SPEED OF THE CRANK GEAR. IF THE CRANK GEAR IS TURNED ONE COMPLETE REVOLUTION (360 DEGREES), THE CAM GEAR WILL TURN ONE HALF REVOLUTION (180 DEGREES). THE TOE OF EACH CAMSHAFT LOBE IS 180 DEGREES FROM THE HEEL. VALVE CLEARANCE IS ADJUSTED AT THE HEEL OF THE CAMSHAFT LOBE. THIS INFORMATION CAN BE USED TO EASILY SET THE VALVE CLEARANCE ACCURATELY.

IF THE CRANK IS TURNED SO THAT THE VALVE TO BE ADJUSTED IS SET AT MAXIMUM LIFT. ALL THAT NEED BE DONE IS TURN THE CRANK ONE FULL TURN (360 DEGREES) AND THE VALVE LIFTER WILL BE SETTING ON THE EXACT CENTER OF THE CAM LOBE HEEL. THIS IS THE POINT WHERE YOU SHOULD ADJUST THE VALVE TO THE DESIRED CLEARANCE.

THE PROCEDURE IS AS FOLLOWS:

NOTE: THIS PROCEDURE DOES NOT REQUIRE REMOVAL OF THE OIL PAN INSPECTION COVER AND WAS DEVELOPED TO MAKE THE JOB OF VALVE LASH ADJUSTMENT AN EASY CHORE..

1. REMOVE THE FAN, FAN BELT, VALVE COVER (S) AND HEAD FROM THE ENGINE. YOU MAY ALSO WANT TO REMOVE THE RADIATOR TO MAKE THE JOB EASIER.
2. MARK THE VALVES NUMBER 1 THRU 8 WITH NUMBER 1 AT THE FRONT OF THE ENGINE AND NUMBER 8 AT THE REAR. VALVES NUMBER 1, 4, 5 AND 8 ARE THE EXHAUST VALVES. VALVES NUMBER 2, 3, 6 AND 7 ARE THE INTAKE VALVES.
3. TURN THE CRANK HANDLE UNTILL NUMBER 1 EXHAUST VALVE IS AT TOP DEAD CENTER (MAXIMUM LIFT). YOU MAY WANT TO USE A DIAL INDICATOR TO DETERMINE THE MAXIMUM LIFT POINT. THE END OF THE CRANK PULLEY PIN SHOULD NOW BE AT APPROXIMATELY 11:00 O’CLOCK. PLACE A MARK ON THE CRANKSHAFT PULLEY TO IDENTIFY THIS POINT AS YOUR REFERENCE POINT.
4. NOW. USING THE CRANK HANDLE, TURN THE CRANKSHAFT EXACTLY 360 DEGREES. ( ONE FULL CRANK REVOLUTION). THE VALVE SHOULD NOW BE SEATED AND THE END OF THE CRANKSHAFT PULLEY PIN SHOULD BE BACK AT 11:00 O’CLOCK.
5. NOW, CHECK THE VALVE CLEARANCE OF NUMBER 1 EXHAUST VALVE AT THIS POINT. IF NECESSARY, MAKE ADJUSTMENTS TO THE VALVE CLEARANCE TO OBTAIN THE PROPER CLEARANCE. AFTER ADJUSTMENT, RECHECK THE CLEARANCE.
6. REPEAT THIS PROCEDURE FOR ALL FOUR OF THE EXHAUST VALVES,
(VALVES NUMBER 1, 4, 5 AND 8).
7. NOW, TURN THE CRANK HANDLE UNTIL NUMBER 1 INTAKE VALVE IS AT TOP DEAD CENTER (MAXIMUM LIFT). THE END OF THE CRANKSHAFT PULLEY PIN SHOULD NOW BE NEAR 1:00 O’CLOCK. MAKE NOTE OF THIS POINT AS YOUR REFERENCE POINT.
8. NOW. USING THE CRANK HANDLE, TURN THE CRANKSHAFT EXACTLY 360 DEGREES. THE VALVE SHOULD NOW BE SEATED AND THE END OF THE CRANKSHAFT PULLEY PIN SHOULD BE BACK AT 1:00 O’CLOCK.
9. CHECK THE VALVE CLEARANCE OF NUMBER 1 INTAKE VALVE AT THIS POINT. IF NECESSARY, MAKE ADJUSTMENTS TO THE VALVE CLEARANCE TO OBTAIN THE PROPER CLEARANCE. AFTER ADJUSTMENT, RECHECK THE CLEARANCE.
10. REPEAT THE PROCEDURE ABOVE FOR ALL FOUR OF THE INTAKE VALVES,
(VALVES NUMBER 2, 3, 6 AND 7), USING THE 1:00 O’CLOCK REFERENCE POINT.
11. THIS COMPLETES THE VALVE ADJUSTMENTS.
12. CHECK YOU’RE WORK CAREFULLY AND YOU WILL BE PLEASED WITH THE RESULTS.

I HOPE THAT THIS INFORMATION IS USEFUL AND WORKS WELL FOR YOU AS IT HAS FOR ME. PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF YOU HAVE ANY COMMENTS OR SUGGESTIONS.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester W. Lowery TN on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 01:46 pm:

Thanks Steve,
I copied and printed your post about valve adjustment and added to my Model T book of information.....If I don't I'll forget where I read it and than get ticked off because I forgot.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 02:07 pm:

I've done what Glen says, and I own several of the KR Wilson valve setting / piston position gauges. I don't think I would ever use one again on one of my cars. Using the KR Wilson valve adjustment method the car idles more smoothly, but I don't believe it makes a whole lot of difference in performance.

Its remarkable how much better your T will run with a good camshaft versus a worn out camshaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 05:53 pm:

As for using the piston travel for adjusting the valves - I've always assume that all you're doing is detuning everything to the weakest cylinder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve McClelland on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 12:13 am:

Chester your welcome...
Lots of true statements, with all the above rebuttals about valve timing... New parts are great and no doubt would be the best way to go but for some of us old poor folks that can't afford a $1200 crank, or a $400-500 camshaft and $1800 of machine work, just know there are other ways; just like the old timers used to do just replace what you need if it ain't broke don't fix it... Save your $$$$
For those of us that have more time than money the valve timing sequence will change your model T driving pleasures tremendously, 10 times easier to start, we've had tons of the elusive (free starts) after valve timing was completed on an old half worn out 1919 engine.
We did stainless valves, aluminum pistons, new rings, new head gasket, adjustable lifters, Not a rebuild just a fresh-n-up job. All we could afford to do at the time....
And the ol'car pulled like a mule, idled like a Rolls Royce, and would go 45 mph any day of the week. Even in the dead of winter I never turned the crank handle over 4 turns and the first 2 rounds was to choke it! She always fired up on the 3rd or 4 pull....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester W. Lowery TN on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 10:28 am:

Royce, I wouldn't dare to disagree with you about new parts can make things better. This being my first T, I went with the 280 degree cam, Aluminum pistons, Z-head .30 over bore, and the list goes on and on.... But it is still very interesting to know how to get one to run decent when you locate a barn find and just want it to run...I love all this information....I may never be able to afford to do everything to my next one as I did this...But it seems with the knowledge on this forum a person can find a way to fire one up..... may not be the best running at the time it starts, but just to here one run that hasn't in years is a thrill......I'm trying to purchase a spare 26 engine from a friend that is in that condition.....probably 50 years since its even been turned over....I know, I'll be tearing it down and checking and replacing everything and listening to the wife every time I say I need.....But after 40 years I shouldn't complain...It's always been like that.....Lots of fun though....And she likes it too....she usually comes out in the garage and helps clean parts and wax and clean the cars....I shouldn't say much, she may read this also...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 05:13 pm:

Chester, if that oil port was moved a little more to the front to line it up with the starter ring gear, you would not need those oil slingers at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 05:56 pm:

Steve, I would love to see the starter block off oiler. What diameter is the troft and how far did it extend into the hogshead? Sounds neat. My pile of parts came minus starter, and at the age of 30 I think hand cranking is fun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 01:45 pm:

Seems like everyone who doesn't use magnets or slingers defends it by saying that the engine gets plenty of oil anyway because, {insert your reason here}.

Well, maybe that's all true but, how do you expect that your transmission is getting oiled? Are you also saying that having less oil circulated is as good as having more oil moved about?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 02:40 pm:

Jerry,
I use an out side HV 1/2" oil line going from the Hogs Head to a 1/2" fitting brazed in the pan looking at #1 rod. Similar to the Texas T HV outside oil line kit.

Now, to answer your second question. Jerry, you need to help me on this one....start by removing the floor boards then the transmission inspection cover. While looking down at the bands, start the engine and rev it up a little....will only take a moment and you will have your answer.

Your last question.....remember, it takes approx. 5 quarts of oil to have oil flow out of the top petcock. The oil pumped up front flows back to the flywheel filling the dip troughs along the way. Having more oil circulating also helps cool the engine better and cools the oil. Oil is what is cooling the lower end....water circulation is only on top.

Enjoy....I like Jerry's questions


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 03:35 pm:

Les,

I have removed the cover on a few of my cars that still have the magnets. I have not revved them, as you suggest. You can't even see the transmission or bands beyond the torrent of oil. Very little oil gets thrown out by the way, so long as you don't rev it, as Les would have me do. ;>)

I can't believe you could get the same affect with no slingers or magnets.

Your last comment I agree with 100%, which is why I think having magnets/slingers must be better than having neither. (Regardless of other external oil lines)

Happy touring!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester W. Lowery TN on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 04:58 pm:

I don't mean to beat a horse to death but I new I had some better pictures of where the external oil piping enters the block.... This system is all hand made and as you can see it enters the TOP of the front and also the MIDDLE of the block.... That way it flows down and around.... Some of you probably know who's design this particular system is when you closely look at the pictures.... He always told me that some will disagree but you can't get too much oil flow as stated above....proper oil lubrication and oil cooling....longevity of the engine...Either way it can't hurt unless you just want to keep it all original and there isn't anything wrong with that either.....
External Oilng SystemExternal Oil System


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 05:14 pm:

Jerry,
If you are not going to use a HV outside oil line as I described.......I would not run with only a bare flywheel. You may get away with the "Old Ford Faithful" inspection cover oiler. I have put them on friends cars prior to using the Texas style HV outside oil line kit.
I live in Fallbrook Ca. where we have many hills...some 6% or more....so, I go up and down a lot of hills. Have been doing this for 14yrs. with no bearing adjustments or transmission problems. I'm not the only one running with this set up coupled with using synthetic 10/30 oil.

Until you try it.....I under stand your concern. My Dad, who is 96yrs. old removed the magnets when he was young and playing with T's. Then, there were no slingers available.
A bare flywheel, running in oil....is a great pump providing you capture oil in a pick up in the hogs head that is in line with the flywheel.

Do some experimenting your self using an electric drill with a large washer spinning partially submerged in a cup of warm oil. Try using conventional oil and then switch to synthetic.
Magnets and slingers act like an egg beater and cause the oil to foam....conventional oil is much worse than synthetic in foaming.

Trying to drive/splash oil from the flywheel which is half surrounded by the pan and get
enough oil up to rods #1 & #2 is asking a lot for the speeds that we drive our T's today.

Most rod bearing failures occur with #1 & #2 bearings first.

Bottom line, the Texas T style HV out side oil line set up is working great with no flywheel magnets or slingers for those that I know who are using it including my self.


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