Old Photo - Just got my new "Ford kit"

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Old Photo - Just got my new "Ford kit"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 06:46 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 06:58 pm:

"Some assembly May Be Required". Great Photo!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 07:00 pm:

"Steam Gas & Oil Engines Erected & Repaired". Interesting. I don't think I've ever heard of an "erected" engine.

Great photo Erich. Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 07:50 pm:

Great photo! I suppose that's when the term "curb delivery" was coined.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Henrichs on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 07:51 pm:

"Drop shipment"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 07:52 pm:

early forked electric headlights


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, January 11, 2014 - 08:01 pm:

It's a cut from a larger photo seen here in the last days. It's from New Zealand and shows a car of Canadian manufacture. Ford Canada evidently had forked headlights in production for some time in 1915, but it's still debated whether there were any more than prototype '15:s made in the US with forked lights.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Hunter on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 12:21 am:

Erected = built.

Great pic, wouldn't it be fun to open a long sealed shed and find a "brand new" Ford still in its original shipping case.

Cheers, Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 04:39 am:

Erich,
I can't understand why you posted this picture, which you copied from another current thread, and with neither a caption or comment nor any reference to the source.
John Stokes
New Zealand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 04:50 am:

I can John, because I haven't seen it, great photo!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 07:08 am:

Roger, we seem to have quite a few forked type headlights on our Canadian sourced cars. Until This photo, I have never associated black headlight rims with forked lights. I have always presumed the brass rims were correct on forked lights. This photo would indicate that the black rims preceded the change to single post light mountings.

Just for interest.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 10:49 am:

John. I can't understand why you are complaining. Most of us don't care about the source of photos or the reference to the source, so long as the poster takes the time and consideration to share it with us. A public photo that has been out there for over 100 years cannot be plagiarized or stolen.

I, for one, appreciate Erich for posting this great photo as it was very educational to me, documenting one of the ways Model T's were crated up and delivered. Thank you Erich. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 01:52 pm:

I admit it, I can't remember what I have posted or where I got most of the images I have collected. I love model Ts, photography, history, etc.......any duplication is not intentional (I do get away from the forum from time to time, honest). I am just glad others find them as interesting as I do. The full story of the far reaching Ford Model T may never be completely grasped, but it sure is fun to get a glimpse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 02:38 pm:

Erich - I like everything you post. Please keep up the good work.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 03:25 pm:

Keith, Thanks, but you obviously haven't read everything I have posted. I don't even like everything I have posted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 06:24 pm:

Thank you!! I had not seen that before so again i say thank you!! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 09:44 pm:

Allen,
I bet the headlight rims are not black. They look like the front of the radiator to me! Maybe Ford used something to protect the bright work during shipping like the modern day white plastic you see on some new cars being shipped today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 09:48 pm:

I think the steering column has already been reinstalled. The crates could then be stacked for shipment. Nice picture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 09:56 pm:

I can't see that being the case Mike. The rad and lenses are not protected so why the trim rings? The front of the car is far from the wood on the crate also. Looks like the axles are bolted down so the car can't move. The trim rings look black to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mattthew G California on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 10:01 pm:

Can someone please direct me to a higher resolution copy. I really like the sign!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Geisler on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 11:42 pm:

Erich,
Great photo! I've been a member since 1971 (off and on)and I have never seen it (that photo), I think.
Some guys just like to "Stir the Pot" they call it here. I quit posting here several times as I had a very HARD time getting use to it also. I even removed my photos and info twice! I am of the opinion that I know a lot about T's as it has been a study interest of mine ever since my first ride in one in 1961. I was drag racing a model A with a flathead in it then. A kid of 14 then. I had to have older guys tow, enter my car and get it thru inspection so I could drive it in the time trials. The older guys got to race it that year and that was ok until they broke the trans. (3 times). But once I rode in an original T and asked< "Is this for real? They made cars like this?" I was hooked. So Erich, you just keep on putting what you can input into the Forum and we'll "make something of it!", as my old USMC sgt. use to tell me, "Spit it out!"
We ALL sometimes read what we wrote on the forum and then HIT the Post key and say, "My God did I write or spell that!!???"
Joe in Mo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 12:33 am:

I have a full description of how the cars were packed.

The wheels were clamped to the sides of the box the roof was strapped over the motor the steering wheel was placed on the upholstery, the steering column left in place. The box was 12' long, 6' wide 4' high.

After removing the top of the box the four sides were dismantled and the car assembled.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 12:43 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dane Hawley Near Melbourne Australia on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 04:36 am:

From "The Barrier Miner" newspaper, Broken Hill, N.S.W. 16th February 1916, Page 3.

FORD MOTOR CARS.


HOW THEY COME FROM OVERSEAS.

A NEW BUCKBOARD CAR.

At Woodman's Motor Garage on Monday six new Ford motor-cars arrived and another seven cars and two motor trollies which were expected have since arrived.

The cars arrived at the garage packed just as they left the Canadian factory of the Ford Company. Popular opinion is that motor-cars from overseas arrive in Australia in parts, and that these parts have to be unpacked and assembled before the car is ready for use. Instead of this being the case, however, there is very little assembling to be done. Each car body (with engine,- axles, steering gear, and lighting plant and fittings, all complete and in place), is boxed up in a packing case of very strong timber. The dimensions of the case for a five seater car are 12ft. x 6ft. x 4ft. The Wheels are detached and fastened to the inside of the case, and the hood is strapped over the engine. The only other parts of any importance that are not in their proper places are the glass wind-screens and the steering wheel, and these are strapped to the upholstered seats. When the top, ends and sides of the packing case are removed the body is packed up and the wheels, etc., put into place in a very short time. All these cars and trollies have come for fulfilment of orders received.

Another new arrival at the garage is a buckboard motor-car, which is a sort of compromise between an ordinary car and a trolly. It is said to be a very popular vehicle with squatters and people in the backcountry districts. The front portion and seat, the latter upholstered, has much the appearance of a motor-car. Behind the seat is an extension after the fashion of the ordinary buckboard, only, much more roomy. For this an extra seat, also upholstered, is provided. This seat is detachable. When in its place, however, the car has accommodation for six passengers. With the seat detached a large amount of luggage or merchandise can be put in the empty space. It is claimed that this vehicle is equal in comfort to an ordinary motor-car, and that it would be a very convenient thing for hunting parties. The specimen on view is the first of its kind to reach Broken Hill, and is for Messrs. Vigar Bros., on the Darling River.

Last month, it is asserted, 131 Ford cars were sold in Adelaide and Broken Hill, the Broken Hill share in this number being 36.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Henry on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 07:51 am:

This I believe is the outside of the building that Kerry posted above


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 10:53 am:

Nice building Dave. I love to be able to go on a tour through it as it was back then. Wow! Semper Fi, Joseph from one "Leatherneck" to another. Jim Patrick

PS To those who don't know why Marines are called Leathernecks, The term originated in the 1700's when Marines wore thick leather collars to protect their necks from cutlass slashes to the neck when they were in battle with the Barbary pirates in Tripoli. The dress blues uniform still consists of the high collars in tribute to those original leather collars. That's me 40 years ago when I served and before I had wrinkles, LOL!.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 11:23 am:

Jim,

Reminds me of my dad. USMC 1953-1983. Colonel Bohlen, JAG. Our last duty station was at Cherry Pt. NC '76 to '80.

Back in the day when our service personnel actually wore uniforms not just fatigues.

SEMPER FI.
(just a personal note tomorrow is the 2 year anniversary of his passing.)

Thanks for sharing the photos.

Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 12:18 pm:

Larry, My condolences on the passing of your Dad. I can tell you are as proud to be his son as the marines were that served under him. Before being assigned to Embassy Duty, I was in the air wing stationed at New River Air Station in Jacksonville, NC in HML 167 as a T-400 twin jet engine mechanic for the UH-1N Huey helicopter. To make it to Colonel in the Marines was quite an honorable achievement, for only the best ever got that far in the Marines and I never met a Colonel that we didn't feel could walk on water if he had a notion to. Semper Fi. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 01:30 pm:

Thanks Jim.
When were you at New River?
The law offices there were under dad's command also.
He had the both the base and the 2nd Marine Air Wing at Cherry Pt., New River and Beaufort,SC.

Command designation was COMCAVS EAST at the time (now long defunked). He had a staff of 70 lawyers working for him back in the day.

Thanks again,
If you are ever up our way in Maryland please stop in.
Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, January 13, 2014 - 11:13 pm:

Wow! Your Dad had his hands full with so much responsibility, but like I said, only the absolute best and most capable attained the rank of Colonel. Had he stayed in he could have probably been Commandant, with so many achievements and commands. You have reason to be proud.

I arrived at New River from training at NAS Millington, Tennessee in the June of 1973 and was stationed there until October, 1974 when I applied for and was accepted to MSG duty, also known as Embassy Duty. I arrived at MSG School (Marine Security Guard School) at Henderson Hall in Arlington, Virginia for extensive training with the FBI, CIA and the diplomatic services to learn how to handle virtually every situation we might be confronted with in the foreign service. After completion of MSG school in January 1975, I shipped out to Karachi Pakistan, where I spent a year as an Embassy guard at the Consul General there until January 1976. After spending a year at such a hardship post, I was rewarded with my next assignment. Spending 14 months as an embassy guard at the American Embassy in Canberra, Australia. Truly a heaven on earth for a young Marine. When my tour of duty was up in March 1977, I flew to the states, was honorably discharged at Treasure island, California and flew home to begin my civilian tour of duty. Semper Fi, Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Geisler on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 12:52 am:

Dang Jim!
You just keep on surprising me!!!!!!!!
I will be back in Fla in Feb at the Zepher and
Webster. Hope to again make it to the Steam Engine show too.
Looking forward to us meeting somehow!
Pm me your phone number.
I tried to call Don L to check up on him. One phone number is no longer in service. The other never answered. Is he ok?
Joe in Mo.


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