Extra oil line to the front of engine

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Extra oil line to the front of engine
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 11:22 am:

Just curious as to why put an extra oil line to the front of the engine, it has been posted on here many times about the how but my question is the why?, the mag post oiler kits use a 1/4" od line to a special fitting that lets the oil through a hole in the front dam on the pan, this oil dribbles into the pan in back and well below the front main, other kits come off the hogshead and does basically the same thing,another is to come off the bendix cover into the side of the pan again putting more oil to the front but well below any running parts, i have heard the going uphill problem, but hills usually go down also, so why the importance in an auxilary front oiler if you keep the line cleaned out and use a screen.
I have too much time on my hands right now and thought i would ask while i have the engine out of my 24.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 11:46 am:

Rick,
The simple answer is that it is a backup lubricating system and most folks think that the more oil you can get circulating and especially to the front of the engine, the better. Some high mileage cars in the day and even today have gotten by just fine with the single original oil line.

There is no oil pressure or oil flow indicator on a Model T. If the interior oil line plugs up or fails in another way the first indication you have is a seized engine or rattling bearings and that is not cheep or good. In addition to a line plugging, the funnel has been known to fall off. With the outside oil line you have a backup system and some have reported running for years on just a mag post oiler when, unknown to them, the original oil line failed for some reason.

I recommend a backup up system but the call is yours.

This is one thing that can happen with poor oil circulation.



Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 11:48 am:

Rick, the texas T parts style assures plenty of oil up front even if the internal oil line clogs(which it surely can when using cotton or Kevlar linings) The mag post oiler that was on my 27 engine was useless, no oil at all. I use my own design similar to the one available from the vendors. This is one accessary that is worth installing. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Katy, Texas on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 12:02 pm:

Rick, While it is true that hills go up and down, many hills and mountains have longer uphill grades per mile than downhill grades and those uphill grades may be steeper than the downhill grades, plus, all the oil in your engine can't repair damage done to an under oiled crank and babbitt if that crank is dry enough to sustain damage, even if over a short period of time. Ford probably didn't do it from the factory to save manufacturing costs, but he sure included an oil pump on the Model A, the Flatheads, and every OHV engine, since. Auxillary oil lines or an oil pump, if you're not worried about authenticity, is just good insurance. Which is cheaper, an oil line or an engine rebuild? Remember, there's no such a thing as "a free lunch, too much spare change, too much horsepower", and I'll add, "too much oil to all parts of an unpressurized engine".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 12:08 pm:

I tore my engine apart and found that the factory oil line was not plugged at all and was doing a perfect job of oiling the front main. It looks correct this way too which is even more important. Perhaps there would be a need for something different though for those who live in hilly areas. Detroit is pretty flat. Maybe Henry didn't give it much thought.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 12:11 pm:

An aside: I have a home brew mag post oiler. Curiosity gets to me at times so I wondered how much oil was getting through it. This was while we were on a multi-day tour. One morning I started the engine and pulled the pipe open at the pan end revealing,.......nothing. Discouraging but I figured it may be plugged so I performed the obvious roadside fix, yup, I blew into it as hard as I could. No resistance was met and I learned what the inside of my engine tastes like (sour face). At the next stop I opened the hood and pulled the pipe open while at idle and it was nearly a reenactment of the Saturday Night Live skit where Dan Aykroyd pretended to be Julia Child after she had cut the dickens out of her little finger. Instead of blood squirting everywhere, it was oil. O.K. so it was not that much drama but there was such a flow of oil I had to quickly plug it back in.

The lesson for me was that the oil has to be warm to flow via this tube but flow it does.

With a splash system the front bearings are farthest from the big splash unit behind number 4 cylinder so anything that puts more oil up front should be of benefit.

If you are thinking of adding an extra oil supply system, do it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 12:19 pm:

Easy way for a visual check, a friend install a piece of clear tube in the liner he also installed a light so he could see the oil flow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 05:54 pm:

When I rebuilt my 1919, the inside oil tube was solidly blocked. Fortunately, years before, I had installed an outside tube from the hogs head forward and I think it saved my engine.
I also drilled-out the holes in the center tube of a glass in-line fuel filter, installed it in the line so now I can readily see the flow of oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Robb on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 06:07 pm:

Hey! I found a picture of that modified fuel filter I use to view the oil flow to the front of the engine!oil viewer.
It's been in the line for about 5-years now with no trouble.
Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By HARRY A DAW on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 06:17 pm:

The internal oil line on my T's has been retrofitted with a larger line to carry more oil. They also have the outside mag post and hogs head oilers. Maybe an overkill but I will take that rather than a burned out bearing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 06:34 pm:

Two basic reasons I think of are: 1. lint plugging the interior line. This can happen when you are not expecting it and first symptom is a knock. 2. Steep mountains or hills. A higher source of oil such as the magneto post will flow to the front of the engine even if the inside oiler is at an angle where the oil won't flow.

Anyway, it's just an additional source of oil and if nothing else, it eases worries.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 10:21 pm:

Rivets can clog an oil line too. When I bought my 15, the seller said the eng and trans on the ground beside it was the original that came with the car when new (according to what his dad was told when he bought the car in the 50's), but was seized. When totally disassembled and cleaned, there was no wear in the trans or engine. Everything spec'd out as new--not even oval shaped crank journals or cylinder bores. The front main bearing area on the crank was blue from heat. An outside oil line may have prevented this and I would have gotten a worn out eng and trans instead of a "like new" one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 10:25 pm:

Out Side Oil Line.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable on Sunday, January 12, 2014 - 10:57 pm:

A point missed here is that you need oil to be in the motor or all the plumbing in the world won't help.

In nearly every case when I have come across a motor which has run bearings front big end or other it's that the owner has not had the motor full of oil. in some cases no oil. From memory on the Pincher Creek Tour there was one car that ran the bearings before it left the motel in the morning of the first day as the owner thought the one drop that came out of the bottom tap meant there was oil. It was nearly empty.

Another reason is drivers try to keep the car doing 20 plus MPH in low when on a hill instead of settling down at revs equal to normal cruising speed in high gear. Low oil, rev the guts out of the motor and it's going to fail.

Neither of my T's has an outside oil line, they have both been on hills as steep and long as can be found anywhere, I personally would doubt that they would ever run the front bearings if there is the correct amount of oil in the pan and they are driven at a slow speed in low gear.

I came to this conclusion when a member asked me how was the front bearing when I had the motor out, we took off the cap and it was in perfect condition. That was 40 years ago and nothing has happened since. Could be it will fail but at this stage I'm doing a test, if it does fail OK but it's looking like I'm the one who will go first.


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