Removing 50+ year old tires

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Removing 50+ year old tires
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevan Mynderup__Hanford CA on Wednesday, January 15, 2014 - 10:56 pm:

Need some advice on how to dismount the tires from the Atlas Steel rim. Yes, they are Atlas Steel Spoke. They have been mounted up for I guess 50+ years and they do not collapse even through I let the air out of them. I am about ready to put a cutting blade on the hand grinder and cut them off.
Any ideas suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
Kevan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, January 15, 2014 - 11:07 pm:

The Central Valley doesn't get much above 70 this time of year, but if you can manage to warm them up they might be a little softer. If that doesn't work, I don't see anything wrong with cutting them carefully so you don't damage the rims.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Neil Marthedal on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 12:21 am:

I always use a hack saw. Cuts right through them like butter. Less chance of nicking the rim than using a power tool.
Fresno, CA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 02:45 am:

Kevan, slow down a bit!!! I helped an old guy out with some bits for his improved Ford. Before I got there he cut some 30x3.5" tyres off some rims with a hack saw, and ruined three as new, never punctured Olympic butyl rubber tubes, about $100 worth on today's market, but of far superior quality.

I bought two excellent Hayes 30x3.5" rims at a swap meet a couple of years ago, fitted with new Goodyear Pathfinder tyres which were so hard that if I dropped them they would break! Not wishing to repeat the above sin, I prised them out of the beads and carefully cut them off without getting into the tubes. The result was two perfectly preserved red rubber, metal stemmed tubes which were probably fitted with the new tyres. Both are in service on my 1917 T and rarely need air, certainly no more frequently than any of the others.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 06:05 am:

May I make a suggestion, for hard tires I go visit my local powder coater and ask to set them in his oven for a few minutes. His oven is 450 degrees and large enough they don't get in his way, when they come out, a couple of pry bars and they dismount relatively easily.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 06:54 am:

I break the bead around the rim by squeezing them in a bench vise. I put the tire in the vise up to the rim, tighten the vise and rock the tire back an forth. This breaks the tire away from the rim. I do this all the way around the tire and it helps. Then I warm them up and use my tire tools to remove it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 08:22 am:

Wes -- powder coater oven -Great idea.

Dennis -- I used a big c-clamp

Kevan -- Heat is the way! I tried to replace a tube in a 50 year tire and got nowhere until I read that heat was the trick.
I placed the tire in the sun for a few hours, broke the bead with a c-clamp, and used tire tools from harbor freight to pry the tire off the rim.
When it came time to put it back together I used the sun and the plastic bag technique to put things back together.
I couldn't believe how easy it was once I was "edumacted" by the knowledgeable folks here.

I learned my lesson - I have 4 new tires and tubes on the garage shelf and am waiting until it gets warm before changing them.

Global warming has it's advantages :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 08:54 am:

Don't cut them off. If you have tread, and the rubber is not dry rotted and crack all the way through those tires are still good and can be used. The set of Universal tires and tubes I purchased from Snyders and put on my car new, in 1970, are still good and on the car. Of course an occasional application of brake fluid to all sides of the tires has helped them to weather the years. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 10:27 am:

None can resist the power.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevan Mynderup__Hanford CA on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 11:55 am:

Looks like Heat is the way to go. Have to wait a few months until the weather warms up here in the Sam Joaquin Valley. Low 40's at night and mid 60's daytime. I will try the method Dennis Seth suggested. Bench Vise. Thanks for the suggestions and help. Kevan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 12:16 pm:

No reason to wait until spring. I have a 2 temp Milwaukee heat gun which I recommend. Low temp is 700 degrees F and high temp is 1200 degrees F. Great for removing paint and quick drying rinsed steel parts to inhibit the formation of surface rust. I see no reason why it could not be used for heat softening hard tires, as well. The whole tire would not need to be heated, just the area 6" to 12" to each side of the bead you were prying off. Keep it moving though, for it can get your tire hot enough to catch fire. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 01:34 pm:

"May I make a suggestion, for hard tires I go visit my local powder coater and ask to set them in his oven for a few minutes."

I love these kinds of suggestions on this forum because they're so idealistic. Sort of like when people say to go to your local roofing place and ask for some free tar chips for rebuilding coils.

In my experience, I'm lucky if they actually treat me with respect as a paying customer. Most of the time, they act as if they're the ones doing me a favor.

Sorry, it's a good idea Wes but I wouldn't want the abuse from asking. Maybe this sort of thing would have worked 20 years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Brancaccio - Calgary Alberta on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 02:35 pm:

OK Bob, I fixed the double post, what are those clamps called and where do you get them?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 04:17 pm:

Bring them to San Diego. It is 80 degrees today! It has been hot and dry all January and this is usually one of our coldest and wettest months. All the cold and water went east this year. Just bring here and set them in the sun.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 05:09 pm:

Dan, I should have mentioned coffee and donuts in hand on occasion helps...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 11:08 pm:

Wes, you're right. Works for me every time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 11:24 pm:

About "breaking the bead", this is really "rude & crude", but as kids in high school in the '50's, I remember we used to lay the wheel/tire flat on the street or driveway and position it just right in front of another kid's car and just run over it with a car! (Mostly 'cause we didn't have that big bench vise, or even a bench, or clamps,.....) Saves time and trouble hauling them to another location too!

(old age and treachery doesn't "ALWAYS" beat youth & skill, right?)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, January 16, 2014 - 11:29 pm:

Oh, and by the way, not only does that always work, but it won't matter how hard that old rubber is, and it won't damage what might be a good useable inner tube either!


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