Slow speed notch pin

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Slow speed notch pin
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 02:07 pm:

I am installing new pedal cams and the low speed notch pin fits snug but not tight,everything is new, shaft, notch and cam, how do you set the pin in the notch?, i was planning on using Loctite to hold it from slipping and then bucking it and peen the end, should this be done cold or heated.
I have the engine and transmission as well as the service manual and this is not discussed in any of them.Any suggestions are appreciated.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT BERGSTADT on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 02:35 pm:

Cold peen both ends, Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender Tulsa Oklahoma on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 02:45 pm:

Rick

I use a piece of a rail road rail, but anything would work to buck a rivet. 1/4" round steel rod about 1.300" in length. Peen over one side, flip the hogs head over and do the same. Takes a couple of flips striking each side to set. Installed cold.

Some will use a roll pin, not my choice but.........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 03:20 pm:

Mike is right on about not using a roll pin in that application... they can and do break!

Been there, done that, never again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 04:13 pm:

Mike, thanks a piece of RR track is just right to buck with, a couple of hits on one side sets it good and then finish with the other side, quick and effective.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 04:18 pm:

When replacing mine, I thought about using a grade 8 bolt and staking the end after threading a nut on it with Loc-tite; that is until I was informed by other forum posters that I was putting lives in danger by doing so. So I used the solid steel pin and can now sleep at night.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 05:58 pm:

If you are going to use railroad rail for a bucking piece please be sure to check the train schedule before getting too involved in your work!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 06:10 pm:

Excellent use for a piece of rail, Mike !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Spencer Vibert on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 07:39 pm:

Rick My train of thought has left the station


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, January 17, 2014 - 07:53 pm:

I am going to open a can of worms, the pin is soft and it's only peened over on the ends. I know at least one person that has used a bolt for years and never had a problem. May be someone could re explain why they think using a bolt is putting life in danger. I have used a rolled pin in one of my clutch forks for years, did add a safety wire, and it is tight on the shaft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Saturday, January 18, 2014 - 10:45 am:

Mark - Here's the thread I posted last year regarding replacing the pin with a bolt.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/377540.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Saturday, January 18, 2014 - 10:47 am:

I believe by peening both ends, that action would actually shorten the pin forcing it to swell inside the hole cavity in the shaft and notch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, January 18, 2014 - 11:15 am:

I don't know about putting life in danger, that might be a bit of an exaggeration. Suffice to say installing a rivet is within the means of anyone who owns two hammers, and is the best answer.

I clamp one hammer in the bench vise, and then am able to rest the transmission on the hammer in such a way that I can hit the rivet (made from a bolt) and swell the rivet in the hole. The peened over ends are not the main thing holding the rivet. The rivet swells in the hole so there is no slop.


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