TT rear end oil???

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: TT rear end oil???
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 07:21 am:

What lube are yous guys using in your TT rear ends? Thanks, Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 07:28 am:

I have whatever it is the vendors are calling 600w. I've heard that it is really just 140w available at any parts house, but couldn't say. I do know that steam cylinder oil can still be purchased, but don't know if any of the vendors repackage it as 600w or not.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 01:08 pm:

I use the so called 600 oil from Snyders... M-533 its around 9 bucks a bottle in my rear ends including the TT. I keep a bottle on the shelf all the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, January 20, 2014 - 09:22 am:

Here's what Ford had to say about lubricating the TT rear axle: http://www.mtfca.com/books/1926Inst.htm(1926)

"What about Lubricating the Rear Axle? Answer No. 116
Extreme care must be used in lubricating the differential. An A-i heavy fluid or semi-fluid oil, should be used and carried at a level with the upper oil plug. The differential is supplied with the required amount of lubricant when the truck leaves the factory and the supply should be maintained by replenishments as required. After running the truck about 500 miles, the oil should be drained off by removing the lower oil plug, and the differential filled with fresh lubricant. This operation should be repeated at approximately 1000 miles, and after that whenever necessary. The rear axle outer roller bearings are lubricated by means of dope cups. These cups should be kept filled with a good grade of grease and given a full turn every 100 miles. Before putting the truck back in service after the rear axle has been taken down, fill the differential with oil, jack up the axle and run it for five or ten minutes to insure proper lubrication of all bearings."

Here's what Ford said about lubricating the car's differential:

"What about Lubricating the Differential? Answer No. 104
Do not make the mistake of putting to much grease in the differential housing. The housing should not be more than one-third full. The differential is supplied with the required amount of lubrication when the car leaves the factory. The oil plug should be removed about every 1000 miles and more grease added if necessary. If a fluid grease is used the level should be approximately one and one-half inches below the oil hole."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Monday, January 20, 2014 - 11:13 am:

Dan,
Back a few years, I read an article written by a TT owner....down under that was concerned with the bronze color in his TT rear axle. The article was titled "Not All Oils Are The Same".
He had replaced the bronze worm gear (Expensive And Hard To Find) and did not want it to deteriorate like the old one.
He replaced the old oil he had been using with synthetic gear oil.
His home was on a hill with a steep drive way. The first thing he noticed that going down the steep drive way.....he now had to use his brakes to slow down. Before changing to synthetic oil, he did not need to use brakes going down his steep drive way. In addition, going up the drive way.....he could go much further up before shifting down using the synthetic gear oil compared to before. Also, when checking the oil level using synthetic gear oil, the oil no-longer had the bronze or gold appearance.

For 14yrs. I have been using synthetic gear oil purchased from McMaster Carr in the Ruckstell differential in our 13 touring and the gear oil has not turned bronze.
I believe most conventional gear oils contain sulfur which attacks bronze or brass materials.

I also use synthetic 10-30 in the engine and yes, it gets black like conventional oil. Over the 14yrs. of driving our 13 on numerous tours, I have never made any rod or main bearing adjustments since rebuilding the engine. I do use a large (1/2") outside oil line.


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