Whatzit

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Whatzit
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 11:59 am:

tool in hand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 12:21 pm:

Steering wheel pullers?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 12:30 pm:

Mark, That what I use them for but the catalogs call them Cam Gear Pullers. The trouble with the ones I have are four legs they will not pull the cam gears with the three legs. So far I have never found a three leg puller.

They sure work good for the steering wheels. I have never had a steering wheel that I could not pull with them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 12:32 pm:

I almost never use these two whatzits. I have one that is much, much better.

pullers


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 01:57 pm:

Axle bearing sleeve removers - Cantrell-Miller - T & TT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Butterworth on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 03:28 pm:

Want to sell the one on the right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 11:38 pm:

Tom:

I should sell it because I never use it but I think I will hold on to it in case I do need it someday.

This is the one I use most of the time. Its a Stevens and much, much superior.

sleeve remover


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 11:38 pm:

Tom:

I should sell it because I never use it but I think I will hold on to it in case I do need it someday.

This is the one I use most of the time. Its a Stevens and much, much superior.

sleeve remover


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 11:42 pm:

Tom:

I should sell it because I never use it but I think I will hold on to it in case I do need it someday.

This is the one I use most of the time. Its a Stevens and much, much superior.

sleeve remover


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 11:43 pm:

wrenches


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 19, 2014 - 11:45 pm:

Sorry, I will try again.

tools


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 20, 2014 - 01:40 pm:

I tried to post this whatzit yesterday but failed but I think maybe I have it today. I am afraid I am not very good with this computer business. Its a very handy tool when you need it, but not used too often. So far no one had tried a quess on the wrenches above. the socket is 9/16" The wrench with the double socket has a 5/8" on the other end. I use those wrenches OFTEN.

hand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 20, 2014 - 01:40 pm:

I tried to post this whatzit yesterday but failed but I think maybe I have it today. I am afraid I am not very good with this computer business. Its a very handy tool when you need it, but not used too often. So far no one had tried a quess on the wrenches above. the socket is 9/16" The wrench with the double socket has a 5/8" on the other end. I use those wrenches OFTEN.

hand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, January 20, 2014 - 02:20 pm:

Wrenches are carb/gen tightening wrenches. The other gadget is a frame tightening wrench,Factory.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 20, 2014 - 03:28 pm:

Jack:

You are too easy. I am going to have to put some harder ones on. I seemed to have misplaced my Frame Bolt Tightening wrench. The one I have in my hand. It looks like I will have to make one as they are so handy when you are putting a body on the frame. If I left the wrench on one of the bolts it is of coarse gone now somewhere along a road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 12:03 am:

This tool might be a little harder for Jack or anyone else to ID. I bought it at a swap meet and I had to ask the seller what it was. Its maybe the most worthless tool I have and I will never have any use for it other than to show it to walk ins. I hope the picture comes out as I am having a lot of trouble with the picture.

Worthless


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 12:06 am:

I have a close up to the Head. Sorry I can't make out the name of the manufacture.

head of worthless


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 12:07 am:

I forgot to say the socket is 5/8".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 12:07 am:

I forgot to say the socket is 5/8".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 12:12 am:

Fourth rod bearing wrench. The hooks gave it away.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 01:29 am:

Jack: I really did not think you would know that one. Try this. I use this tool a lot. I think it really helps the safety aspect.

piture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 01:39 am:

Jack:

I hope this works, I will try it aain. I really like this tool and use it a lot.

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 01:39 am:

Jack:

I hope this works, I will try it aain. I really like this tool and use it a lot.

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 01:46 am:

I guess brake adjusting tool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 02:48 am:

This one will probably be an easy one. I put one in the trouble truck on every Tour. We had to use it on a Colorado/Wyoming tour on a CenterDoor way out from any town.
pictre


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 02:50 am:

I would swear I hit the correct button but did not work, I will try again.

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Money - Braidwood, IL on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 05:38 am:

Isn't that the tool when the axle breaks so you can get home?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 06:51 am:

One of the Whatzits in use. Is working well, as good as the sleeve puller we have now.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 09:47 am:

Doug Money:

You are correct. I will try and post a picture of it in use when a T from back East broke an axle on the Colorado/Wyoming Tour. The strange thing about the broken axle was it broke about 1/4" inch from the end nut.

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 01:37 pm:

I believe judging by all the old adds that Apco had the most tools and accessories during T Time.
This whatzit is pretty poor. I used it about a half dozen times or slightly more and it broke in half. It appears to be some very cheap cast Iron. I welded it back together but it is only a wall hanger now.

wall hanger


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 01:45 pm:

Photo (maybe) of the whatzit above.

wall hanger


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 01:45 pm:

Photo (maybe) of the whatzit above.

wall hanger


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 02:13 pm:

I think I know what this is,but will let other guess.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 03:56 pm:

It's for pulling the steering wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 04:08 pm:

Dave,

THANKS FOR THE "WHATZITS" THREAD!

I am enjoying it please keep going.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 09:35 pm:

Stan, Thanks your right. It has a tab one each end that fits under the spider.

Do you or anyone else have an idea on the next whatzit. I found it in Lincoln, Kansas. the old boy had a huge barn and some outbuildings bulging with model T Parts. In the Barn you could not walk on the floor as it was a foot deep with model t Parts. When ever I was in the area I would stop and pick up a bunch of parts. He finally died and they had a two day auction.

picture

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 09:35 pm:

Stan, Thanks your right. It has a tab one each end that fits under the spider.

Do you or anyone else have an idea on the next whatzit. I found it in Lincoln, Kansas. the old boy had a huge barn and some outbuildings bulging with model T Parts. In the Barn you could not walk on the floor as it was a foot deep with model t Parts. When ever I was in the area I would stop and pick up a bunch of parts. He finally died and they had a two day auction.

picture

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 09:40 pm:

Wrong second Picture, I will try and find the second picture of this item above.

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 09:41 pm:

Still not correct:

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 03:27 pm:

I'll guess and say a cam operated tire pump. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 03:33 pm:

So far no one will try a guess on the fixture above. The manufacturer is Stewart. The second picture has a part like a con rod on the back.

Maybe the next Whatzit will be easier. This tool is 28&1/4" Long and has an open end wrench with an angle on both ends. This is slightly longer and thicker than the same KRW tool. I can not find a manufacturer,

picture

end of tool


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 03:37 pm:

tool end


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 03:37 pm:

tool end


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 03:49 pm:

Head lamp post bending iron. Could possibly also be used for fender irons.

Stewart timing cover - tachometer drive ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 03:57 pm:

Dave that wouldn't be for an air powered self commencer? A small compressor to charge the air tank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 07:10 pm:

Steve:

Your OK, in fact one of the catalogs called it a bending iron. Note the angle of the ends to just fit the fenders left and right angles. I also use them for bending other things like pedals.

Larry Bohlen:

As near as I can tell you are right, it an air compressor. I thought maybe it was for flat tires or something. Anyway I thought it was interesting and obviously for a model T since it goes in front of a T cam gear. I was beginning to thing no one was going to take guess.
cam gear covers


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 07:43 pm:

This patent looks close to the air pump Whazit . . .

Paul S. Herring
Chicago, Illinois
Automobile Pump
Patent number: 1246919
Filing date: Feb 7, 1916
Issue date: Nov 20, 1917
http://tinyurl.com/n3nel8g


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 07:55 pm:

The next whatzit will be real easy. There is a story behind it. On the 89 National Tour in Estes Park I laid out 50 tools on tables and gave each person signing in a paper with 50 blanks. I had them name as many of the tools as they could. First prize was a brand new interstate battery. One person was from England and quite a joker. When it came to the whatzit below he said it was a hair pin for women when they putting up their har. When it came time to hand out prizes at the final banquet I mentioned his name and told the audience that I don't know how big the ladies are in England but I don't think that it would fit our American Ladies. KRW put out an identical Tool but I do not find a manufactures name on this one.

hair pin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 08:26 pm:

I have a factory pedal bending iron, Dave - I'll try and remember to take a photo to post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 08:34 pm:

Dave,

Here's the link to an earlier discussion about the air pump and starter:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/117851.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 08:39 pm:

I have seen a lot of ring compressors ,but have never seen one with any ID on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 08:42 pm:

Dave, that pump is part of a Stewart Air starter. It runs full time when the engine is running, fills a tank that on the first ones mounted under the right front fender and later under the car. It had a power unit that replaced the crank and would spin the engine pretty rapidly through about ten revolutions. They apparently worked pretty well when the T was new and the air hoses didn't leak and the engine started right up. Their fault was not having a crank for when there was no air and I think the later ones may have had one although I have not seen one that does.

The unit mounted on a special front engine/spring clamp that is embossed "Stewart." I found one of those on a frame I bought at an auction in North Dakota several years ago, didn't know what it was for until I bought the compressor.

I have a NOS pump setup,it is very well made. It have never been able to find the starter unit although I know there is one out there, I've been contacted twice by a guy who has one and wants me to donate my pump to him. There are probably more. I bid $1000 on the one at that auction in Illinois a couple years ago, it sold for $600, the auction company had no answer for why I didn't get it.

A big claim to fame was that you also had air for tires.

Stewart was a big company, built top quality products.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 08:44 pm:

Looks like a piston ring compressor. Or a hairpin for an English woman.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 08:49 pm:

That other thread is pretty interesting. I had forgotten that was on here. Wish I still had that old Corbett truck, it would be a real collector now. I can still hear that air starter spinning that Buda engine over.

Back to the shop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Wednesday, January 22, 2014 - 11:30 pm:

Steve:

I wish you would I have a much smaller bending iron, maybe its the same.

picture

Taken


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 12:00 am:

Mike Garrison:

You are right on. I never use it because the modern ones are so much better. Usually an old model 'T shop tool is easier to use on a model T but this is not one of those tools, Time permitting I will put some more on tomorrow if people are not getting tired of them. I think the first one I will put on tomorrow will be very difficult.

picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 01:59 pm:

I believe that the Whatzit for today is the most useless accessory put out in model T times. It takes two. I have never seen any others. I have read about them in Kennealy's books or somewhere else. I am having trouble with this picture as usual but I will try please don't shoot the messenger.

support


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 02:01 pm:

support


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 12:27 pm:

I hope someone can ID this Whatzit. I don.t know what it was used for. I use it to adjust my headlight buckets. I put the four little tabs against the lens. The four arms slides along the bar. The bar is 48" long. I have always wondered if it was some thing to align wheels somehow.

bar

arms


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 12:33 pm:

I hope someone can ID this Whatzit. I don.t know what it was used for. I use it to adjust my headlight buckets. I put the four little tabs against the lens. The four arms slides along the bar. The bar is 48" long. I have always wondered if it was some thing to align wheels somehow.

bar

arms


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 12:56 pm:

OK here's one of mine to test your knowledge:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 12:58 pm:

Headlight rim remover.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 01:14 pm:

Bingo!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 01:42 pm:

It looks like it would work real well. I see Lang's is selling one like it6575RT. I knew an old timer that made one out of a transmission band with two wood handles to squeeze the rim. I find using a rubber squeeze tool real good for installing or removing head light rims real good.

rubber tool


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 01:42 pm:

It looks like it would work real well. I see Lang's is selling one like it6575RT. I knew an old timer that made one out of a transmission band with two wood handles to squeeze the rim. I find using a rubber squeeze tool real good for installing or removing head light rims real good.

rubber tool


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 01:46 pm:

rubber tool


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 03:57 pm:

I will try to post a few..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 04:01 pm:

another angle..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 04:11 pm:

easy one..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 04:12 pm:

Here is a variation..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 04:13 pm:

I had a lot of trouble with this one..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 11:29 pm:

What?No takers??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Morsher on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 11:57 pm:

i'm guessing the last one is a driveshaft bushing puller.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 12:03 am:

;Jack: I would take a wild guess that the one you call variation is for the carb flange bolt on one end and the three Generator mounting bolts on the other end.

The first two pictures are a lot like a tool I have for holding nuts that have been rounded off.

I don't have a clue on the little short wrench nor the last picture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 12:03 am:

;Jack: I would take a wild guess that the one you call variation is for the carb flange bolt on one end and the three Generator mounting bolts on the other end.

The first two pictures are a lot like a tool I have for holding nuts that have been rounded off.

I don't have a clue on the little short wrench nor the last picture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 12:31 am:

I'm not positive,but I think the fist two pictures are a ring cutting tool.The little wrench is a petcock wrench.it slips over the handle of petcock and makes even a tight one,easy to turn.I have found three types of those. The variation one is a carb/gen wrench made by Blackhawk. The last one was a stinker to ID,but is made by the ALLEN electric Co. I had to call Ron Patterson for some help.It was made to pull the race out of Generater endcaps when bearing went bad.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Morsher on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 12:35 am:

keep 'em coming, Jack. great to learn new stuff !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 01:55 pm:

Jack:

Thanks for the pictures, I hope you do more as I enjoy anything to do with T era tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 03:08 pm:

Here is one that every one can probably ID but the type is vary rare. This is the only one I have ever seen.

hub cap wrench


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 03:11 pm:

Once again I got the PINK - file locking error. picture


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Sanford - Lucas, TX on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 03:48 pm:

This is not a special "whatzit" tool but I would like to confirm something about Model T keys. Some keys for early coil boxes have a square hole in the handle and some do not. I thought it was there to keep from loosing the key into the transmission (or other places) like Dave Huson's picture on other threads.

Dave Huson's key Key without hole
Key with hole

What was the real purpose of the square hole in the key? (I am a new owner of a 1914 so I have a lot to learn about the early Ts.)

BTW, I have enjoyed the other items posted on this thread.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 03:55 pm:

The square hole just happens to fit the valve on an Acetylene tank. Go figure...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 07:02 pm:

Dennis:

I bought 25 Keys at Chickasha one time and they all had the hole. In fact they were all on a wire loop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 07:09 pm:

Nice wheel puller, Dave - I have the first one I've ever seen with yours being the second.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 07:13 pm:

Steve Tomaso:

thanks: Do you have the brass handle that tightens the body around hub. mine broke and I was always going to fix it but never did. I use a 5/8" wrench on it now. Boy do I like my puller they are so much faster than the small ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 07:13 pm:

Steve Tomaso:

thanks: Do you have the brass handle that tightens the body around hub. mine broke and I was always going to fix it but never did. I use a 5/8" wrench on it now. Boy do I like my puller they are so much faster than the small ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 07:42 pm:

No Dave, mine doesn't either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 10:06 pm:

i sure enjoy this thread of tools and gadgets, but may i request starting a new one,whatzit2 so i dont have run my slow old computer all the way down to see what new! thanks dave and others for the education !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Monday, January 27, 2014 - 10:48 pm:

Agreed ! I have a couple to add.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 - 12:26 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 04:01 pm:

Erich, pretty fancy clothes for working on a flat tire.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 05:07 pm:

A couple of years ago I left work in downtown Denver and on the ramp onto I25 there was a elderly lady standing next to a late model Caddy with a very flat rear tire. She was wearing a Mink coat and had an absolute look of WTF. She could not have weighed more than about 85 Lbs and even if she had known how to change a tire she wouldn't have been able to pull it off. I stopped and gave her my business card so that she would not feel threatened. It took about 5 minuets to change the tire. I told her that she must take care of the flat tire or the next time she would be stuck. She sort of thanked me for helping but wasted no time getting back on the road. I am sure that she was used to having servants take care of her.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 05:18 pm:

That's gotta be a staged photo. Tire isn't flat...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 08:37 pm:

About 55? years ago driving our 1951 F-100 Ford my Dad stopped to change a tire for a Woman.That is how i learned and i will not walk by a Salvation Army Kettle either! Bud in Wheeler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 09:10 pm:

Bud,

You get it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Klem on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 09:51 pm:

A simple tool for many uses is a length of leather about 2" x 18".
It can be used as a strap wrench to remove headlamp rims, or radiator caps, etc., without bunging up the plating. FYI


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