Need help please Identify this very early part

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Need help please Identify this very early part
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT BERGSTADT on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 10:15 am:

This has been in our showcase for many years
very early date, all brass, small throat
thank you,Bob
Looks lite a choking devise, but for what?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By steve miller- mississauga,ontario on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 10:26 am:

gate valve?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 10:54 am:

That either is, or is very much like, the throttle plate off of a reversible Schebler Model D:

http://thumbs1.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/mNgzuhtCZbxRe6F_L010DMg.jpg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 10:57 am:

Schebler carburator


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 11:06 am:



Opps! not as Quick as Walter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 11:23 am:

Yeah, but better photos!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 11:35 am:

Schebler Model D. The same carb my 1908 Reliable Dayton High Wheeler uses. They were offered in 3/4 inch to 2-1/2 inch bore diameter. Were very popular on early 1 and 2 cylinder cars Hit and miss engines and also marine engines. As a general rule if it has a "butterfly" throttle plate it is auto related and if it has a "slide plate" it is hit and miss or marine related. The 2 bolt on castings are reversible, so they will work as an updraft or sidedraft carb.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 11:42 am:

I just noticed yours is a "slide plate" style. So probably was on a hit or miss or marine engine. The part you have is the throttle plate and not a choke plate. To choke a Schebler D there is useally a "flooder" push pin on top of the carb that when pushed down pushes on the float and "floods: the carb with fuel for starting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 12:27 pm:



The top two are pictures of the Schebler that was on my '07 Buick when I got it. It is the slide plate type but may not be what was on there originally. It has both a choke and a "flooder" or "Tickler"
The third picture shows some different sizes and configurations of Scheblers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Morsher on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 01:12 pm:

Those are some of the best early carbs made. mMany different configurations possible, well finished, smooth running, and easy to find today. As mentioned above the slide plate is usually known to be on stationary engines or marine use. The butterfly throttle on horseless carriages. ( i can send a picture to someone if they care to load it here) I have seen very early ads from schebler ( circa 1905) that offered their models for many early popular cars. It has always amazed me that ford didn't offer them originally, instead of the troublesome early holley, buffalo and kingstons...... it probably came down to the bottom line. I would venture a guess , though, that most Pre-T cars that are driven today use a schebler ( if they aren't using an NH , that is )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, January 25, 2014 - 01:59 pm:



These carbs do work well if the Cork Float (F) is in good shape and adjusted properly. I have taken the top of the carburetor off and adjusted it while the the motor running but learned quickly that that is a poor idea as a backfire can ignite the gas in the float bowl.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Redelman on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 01:57 pm:

Richard would you have any instructions on adjusting this carb as this is the carb on the 1907 Model C Reliable Dayton that I am restoring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 03:00 pm:

Steve R. take a look at this: www.oldmarineengine.com/technical/carburetor/scheblerD.html

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Redelman on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 07:14 pm:

Thanks Richard great information just what I was looking for!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Sunday, January 26, 2014 - 08:43 pm:

Steve, Are you from Minnessota.? I believe I talked to you about your 1907 Reliable Dayton. PM me at dobro@artelco.com if you need any info. I believe you were looking for info on your steering tiller.? I lost your contact info back then. I have collected lots of info on the cars. Its funny that you are the second of the 8 known Reliable Dayton owners to post on this model T forum...


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