What is this?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: What is this?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Reeder on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 03:16 pm:

Any help is appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 03:31 pm:

Frame for a trailer ? I see the tie rod is stabilized. Perhaps they kept the pan, torque tube and radius rods to keep the rear axle aligned. I see bolts coming up thru the ends of the top cross member to hold something. It probably worked pretty good if it was made for a trailer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 03:31 pm:

Probably a Hoover Wagon. A rear cross member bolted above the front cross member. And Hassler shock absorbers. Tie rod has what appears to be a tongue bolted to it which pivots at the axle.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nicholas Lingg - Tarboro, NC on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 03:32 pm:

Wagon Frame


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 03:32 pm:

Looks like someone put a rear cross member on the front of a T frame to make a wagon of some kind.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Reeder on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 03:35 pm:

It is a T frame, and was a wagon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Reeder on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 03:39 pm:

Val you are probably right. Any idea of the frame year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Reeder on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 03:40 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Reeder on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 03:43 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 04:54 pm:

Looks like a 1925 frame. The frame is pre-improved (= made before august 1925) and the two rivet brake quadrant came during 1925. The extra rear crossmember looks like a wider 1926 type(?)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 05:05 pm:

Clearly around the mid 20's. Could well be '25.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nathan Bright on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 05:08 pm:

I am also going the wagon route. If you look there is a mechanism that attaches to the axle and tie rod that steers the tires as the horse moves from side to side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 07:03 pm:

Roger,

If it had the two rivet brake quadrant you would be correct that it would be a late 1925 frame. Ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/C-D.htm#Chassis1



Above is the photo of today’s frame and below is a photo of a previous wagon frame discussion. Note the one below is the two rivet mid-late 1925 ish and how it is very straight and not rounded on the ends (posted by Steve Jelf – thanks Steve). Previous discussion was at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/250201.html



Of course a better angle for the photo would show the part better. And a photo of the top of the frame would let us see if the holes for the hood latches were oval (started with the high radiator cars in 1923 as the 1924 model year cars) or still only round – pre-high radiator.

Neat find.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 07:21 pm:

Looks to be another variation of a T frame made into a wagon of some sort.
People would use an old T chassis in various ways and this is another one.
You use to see this and other versions everywhere around the country side until about 20 years or so ago. You would see one at almost every farm auction.

A few are still around and this is one of them.

Here in central Texas they were fairly common to see one and it usually went to the scrap yard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 07:32 pm:

john k you are right on the money. these wagons are still quite common. i've had some that had a factory made hitch, and many home made jobs. this is the first time i saw them add another rear cross member. most the ones i drug home were bent up, torch hacked and rear end last saw oil some time during the 50's. springs broke, big hole drilled for the 4x4 wood wagon rack, and then rusted under where the wood sat. bent front axles and perches wore darn near all the way thru. no drive shafts, just junk unless you need a wagon, or if lucky it has wire wheel hubs. opps, then they would have a nail for the axle key and ruin that too. sound like the ones you guys have found?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 08:24 pm:

Nathan,If it has a long wooden tongue it would be horses instead of horse.If it has a set of Fills it would one horse. If the tongue is iron and short it was used with a car/truck/ or tractor.Bud in Wheeler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Reeder on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 08:59 pm:

another pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Reeder on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 09:03 pm:

Can this still be used for a build?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Saturday, February 01, 2014 - 11:49 pm:

Chris,why not? Good start for a speedster .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 10:07 am:

check for loose rivits, check diagonally for square, and it can be used for speedster. its odd that they left the running boards on, never seen that before. start looking for another rear axle, generally takes 5 junk ones to make one good unless you buy new parts. have fun, show us a pic when done


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 10:30 am:

Plain old ever day wagon frame, the last stop for a T, Lord, they used to be so common.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Kemmerer on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 11:20 am:

Clayton, true you usually don't see the running boards left on when they build a wagon on an old car chassis but it does happen . I once bought a 1910 Rambler chassis from a farm sale that had been made into a wagon. It still had three wheels, all the running board brackets, one running board(wooden) all the brake mechanism and rods. A wonderful find as I already had the engine, radiator and other parts. I still have it and am currently building a body for it. If I live long enough it will someday be a car again. BTW I built my first T from a 25 chassis that had been a wagon. it did have a bent rear axle housing but of course there are plenty of those around
Dale


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Geisler on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 11:29 pm:

Chris, Practically ALL of my cars came from this EXACT find you have posted. Poor people and poor ways was the true Ozarkian farmers code of life. Further... poor paid teachers had to have poor ways and informed students who could lead me to these backwoods spots to find such a find. Not all were T's or Fords either. The motors I usually acquired were saw mills and grain and conveyor belt loaders too. Again if they were easy to spot then the older old car guys had them! So I had to show kids photos of what I was looking for. Yes, by all means BUILD IT! BUT.... ONLY if you have the PASSION to want to REALLY do it!!! If not then sell it on Craigs list, Here on MTFCA sales items, or Ebay. After you have identified it.


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