Repop U-joints

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Repop U-joints
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Webb on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 02:24 am:

What is the word on the repop u-joints from the dealers....not looking to trash talk just have not heard anything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Katy, Texas on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 05:45 am:

With as many good tight used ones available, who cares about a repop? I'll only be interested in one if they ever come out with one that fits right and has modern sealed needle bearings on the rotation surfaces.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 10:25 am:

Several years ago, I bought a U joint from someone in maybe New Mexico (?) that had been rebuilt with needle bearings. I heard all kinds of tales about how it would self destruct, but like I said, this has been several years now, not a whole lot of miles, about average I suppose, but it is still chugging along. Don't remember who he was or if he is still in business.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren Webb on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 11:22 am:

Does anyone know if the guy mentioned above is still rebuilding?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Azevedo on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 11:20 pm:

Yes, the guy mentioned above still rebuilds u joints. I start with an old u joint that has good condition square joints, take it apart, turn down the yokes to fit a modern u joint, polish and heat treat the yokes and then reassemble using grade 8 bolts, locknuts and locking the bearing cups in place. Cost is 110 dollars w/o a core and 100 with a core. I will be in Chickasha in March at indoor booth NP11. My wife has most of the space with her vintage clothes but I will have several u joints there. You can contact me at dribblebit@comcast.net
Larry Azevedo


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 07:26 am:

Larry:

Pictures of your offering would help some to understand the benefits.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 07:31 am:

Grady:

The stories of the needle bearing U-Joint years ago was offered by a guy in north-east Pennsylvania.

I purchased, it failed, I removed. End of story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 08:14 am:

Bob these are different from what I read of his description. It appears he is using a modern u-joint off the shelf and fitting it inside the T u-joint using only the carrier function. The modern U-joint is hardened inside and designed to run needle bearings. The early offering from what I read was a needle bearing running against the original T part that wasn't hardened and was bound to fail quickly. The one Larry describes should last at least as long as the stock T unit but likely much much longer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 10:10 am:

Wonder why the vendors don't sell these. If its good it seems like they would.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 11:48 am:

Gary:

Purposeful posting noting the crap that was offered years ago.

I agree, Larry's offering is quality.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Katy, Texas on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 12:48 pm:

John, vendors probably don't stock and offer Larry's U joints as he does them in limited production. As he stated, he will only have a few with him at Chickasha.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 01:22 pm:

A fellow in our chapter had a needle bearing rebuild. He even got several years out of it... before it fell apart and destroyed itself & the fourth main and cut through the torque tube ball. With all due respect Larry, my feeling and observation is that there is not enough beef in the u-joint assembly to allow for the removal of enough stock to mount the needle bearing cups, at least on the example I saw. I don't know who did the "rebuild" for my friend, but I do know it was junk.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chester Leighton on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 07:35 pm:

I have 1000 miles on a new U joint I got from Lang's with no trouble. The new drive shaft was a different story. The shaft is slightly shorter than an original and hole for the u joint pin is moved back toward the upper bushing. This makes using the modern tapered thrust bearing on the other end nearly impossible when you go to put the pin in and the hole doesn't line up with the hole in the housing. The retaining collar doesn't allow for the removal of the shaft through the ball end so you have to remove the pinion gear and then re install it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 08:11 pm:

What's slightly shorter, 0.020", 0.100"??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 06:38 pm:

I must have gotten lucky. My new Langs driveshaft went in fine with the John Regan adjustable pinion bearing. The hole for the retaining pin in the u-joint lined right up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 08:05 pm:

My experience was the same as Chester's.

With a new repo drive shaft, and new repo U-joint and Fun Projects bearing.

Faced off the upper new bushing the normal amount used with a Ford U-Joint and the Fun Project set.

But with the new repo U-Joint the only way to get the fit was to remove iron from the end of the U-Joint, as the rear end was assembled and last chore was bolting in the torque tube, but the U-Joint pin would not line up, and the flange of the repro U-Joint was impinging on the upper bushing that already was trimmed and seated.

Issue is the hole location and length of the new repro drive shaft, or the length of the new U-Joint bearing surfaces as opposed to stock Ford parts.


Ford on right


repo U-Joint


Repro U-Joint, tight fit on drive shaft, had to draw file the square shaft to allow the U-Joint to slip on fully.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Sunday, February 16, 2014 - 09:36 pm:

Hey guys - make totally sure that the male end of your u-joint slides easily in and out of the transmission since if that end is also not to spec then you can get heavy binding and that will force the drive shaft down and push the pinion gear into the rear end in an extreme case. The hole in the shaft for the ujoint pin is located by a dimension from the pinion end of the drive shaft. The location of the hole is rather critical and dimensioned to be a specific distance from the large end of the drive shaft taper and that dimension location is +/- .005 I KID YOU NOT. The ujoint pivot point must be exactly concentric with the ball pivot point of the drive shaft housing or you will have binding everytime the ball tries to pivot in the back end of the transmission and the ujoint is pivoting inside that ball. They need to be exactly concentric. Think about it. It isn't just about getting the pin to go in. With everything not fitting up - somebody better be checking as to what part is wrong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, February 16, 2014 - 09:59 pm:

My guess if you left out that U-joint pin, no one would ever know. The pinion thrust is always outboard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Monday, February 17, 2014 - 05:45 am:

I am with Ted, I never run the pin with the modern pinion set up. Between myself and friends we have run thousands of miles with no problems. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nathan Bright on Monday, February 17, 2014 - 10:41 am:

hey, i am assuming we are talking about the joint between the engine and the rear end. I was lucky enough to have a great grandfather whom had a NOS universal joint and when i held it next to the repop it was night and day. the repop was better than the one that i took out of my speedster... but still not as good as NOS.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Monday, February 17, 2014 - 01:33 pm:

Ted,

No, the pinion thrust is not always outboard. That's true when the ring & pinion are under load, but, when you coast, the driveshaft will slip downwards, towards the ring gear, and cause improper mesh. Using traditional driveshaft bearings, (i.e. not Fun Projects), the thrust face on the upper torque tube bushing, along with the u-joint pin, maintain proper pinion location AND proper location of the U-joint, as John explains the importance of above. With a Fun Projects kit, it is also essential to use the pin but NOT the upper bushing thrust face because it is still essential to maintain u-joint position, (again see John's excellent explanation).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Monday, February 17, 2014 - 01:47 pm:

As to improper pin hole locations, read John R's posting carefully. He says, "The location of the hole is rather critical and dimensioned to be a specific distance from the large end of the drive shaft taper..."

If you're comparing the location of the holes, in the photos above, by judging their relative location from the shaft's square end, and finding that they're dissimilar, it does not necessarily mean that they're still wrong. It may only mean the drive shafts are dissimilar in length. Instead, lay the shafts side-by-side and align the top edges of the pinion tapers. Then, compare the relative locations of the pin holes. Still off?

In Chester's case, I'm wondering if he realized that the new upper torque tube bushings need to be dressed down so that the pin holes can align? The bushing flanges are usually oversized in thickness so that they can be precisely fit to maintain minimal drive shaft end play.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Monday, February 17, 2014 - 01:58 pm:

What bothers me on some of the new drive shafts are the square corners where the flats meet the shaft outer diameter. The Ford shafts have a nice radius at this transition to avoid stress risers and cracking. One of the new shafts Dan shows above, (bottom photo), has the radius. I guess there are different suppliers? A shaft I bought some time back had those square corners, which I recut to add a radius.


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