Looking for my grandfathers car

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Looking for my grandfathers car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Dragone on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 09:17 pm:

This is a pretty close to impossible search, but in the late 1970's my dad sold my grandfathers 1915 Model T Ford Touring. He sold it to a gentleman in Mount Vernon,New York. It had natural wood wheels, hassler shocks and an evermore brass horn. Obviously not the most correct 15, but it was my grandfathers car and I would love to track it down. It was so long ago that my dad doesnt remember who he sold it to and we dont know the engine number. If anyone knows of a car that may look like that car around that area, I would love to know about it.I would love to own that car. I have a picture of it somewhere so I can try and find that and scan it and post it. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Dragone on Sunday, February 02, 2014 - 09:22 pm:

Also, my grandfather had a 1906 Model N Ford which got sold in the 1950's to Ohio. It was unique in that the turtle deck in the back was made incorrectly. It was made into a box shape instead of a boattail shape. It was black with red interior. I would also love to find that car as well. So if anyone has seen a Model N that might look like this please let me know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 08:04 am:

Alex,

With out the engine numbers it will be much more difficult to locate. However, barring a major accident such as a garage fire, the Ford Model N sold in the 1950’s and the 1915 T Touring sold in the 1970’s most likely are still out there. Both could easily have been re-restored since then. And while an engine swap is less likely for the Model N, the T could have easily had the engine, body etc. swapped out over the past 40 years. Depending on how serious you are for finding them I would recommend:

1. Look through the old HCCA Gazettes under the Pride and Joy section. The “N” could easily be shown there. I don’t remember when they discontinued that feature so the T may or may not show there.

2. Post some photos of both cars. Especially the N. If it was actually a different model (R, S etc) then you need to widen your search. If it was restored they would have gone to the trouble to restore it with the correct rear deck etc. Also check out the photo for other items that would help locate the car. For example the photo of the Rip Van Winkle Model T showing the front driver’s compartment also shows the body number on the right front side of the floor board riser. Something like that would be a great help. Also did your Grandfather’s 1915 have the carriage bolt in the side of the body in front of the rear doors? Most of the early 1915s did not and the Beaudette bodies continued with the wood seat frames and did not have the carriage bolt in front of the rear doors all through 1915 and possibly into 1916 (there goes that memory thing again).

3. Run advertisements in the hard copy magazines like HCCA, AACA, Hemmings, etc. under wanted. Include your phone number, e-mail, and address. Many of those readers do not use e-mail or visit the web and it will broaden your net. It was one of those advertisements in Hemmings that I read, that enabled me to be a small part in helping an owner find his Dad’s Model S Roadster.

4. Dig for additional clues about the engine numbers. Old registrations etc. Was your Dad a member of the HCCA, AACA, etc.? If so did he include his car in one of the registries they published? Some of those contained engine numbers. Did he keep records anywhere else? Can the DMV be of any help (usually not --- but it would be a bummer to find out you are in the “one state” that the DMV would allow you to check older records. Do you have any photos of the cars with license tags on them? If the DMV can be helpful, having that tag number and year would be a great lead.

5. Ask your Dad for additional details. How old was the person who purchased each car. If the person was in his 60s when he purchased the 1915 in the 1970s he probably is no longer with us. If he was younger he might be.

6. Contact the Model T, HCCA, AACA, etc. clubs near where the cars were purchased. Do they have any sort of new letters etc? If so –they might have a note about so-and-so purchasing a 1906 or 1915 etc. And if you sent them some photos some of the long time members might remember the car from way back when. A photo helps most of us much more than a verbal description. Something about the way the brain files things etc. Sort of like when we recognize a face but don’t remember the name etc.

7. If you don’t look the chances are close to “zero.” If you do look, the chances are not great, but it could happen.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alex Dragone on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 08:57 am:

Hap,

Thanks for the great response. I will certainly dig up some photos and post them and try and get more info. Im sure the cars have been restored more than once since they were sold, but you never know. Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 09:25 am:

Alex did your family have any old papers stuck in box's or saved somewhere in a closet or something?

Or maybe some other family members might remember something about the cars since they are kind of unique for a lot of people.

Were the cars ever registered while your Father owned them and if they were maybe the buyer registered them in Mount Vernon, NY. BY now that information has long since been disposed of by the Mount Vernon DMV. But it wouldn't hurt to find out. Maybe Mount Vernon had some old car clubs and if they did you could check with them.
Good Luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 11:43 am:

What was your grandfather's name? My listings from the club list of owned autos from 1960 may list the 1915,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 09:34 pm:

Peter Dragone. Alex comes from a long line of old car nuts:

http://www.hemmings.com/hcc/stories/2013/01/01/hmn_feature9.html


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