Aeroford

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Aeroford
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TJ Harris on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 05:27 pm:

I have been around Model Ts most of my life and have recently been thinking about adding one to my project car stash. While doing my research I found mention of the Aeroford from overseas but I have not been successful in locating a picture of one, does anyone on here have pictures of any of the Aerofords and if not how where they different in design?

Going to explore an old junkyard that's hasn't been accessed since around the 70s no telling what will be found but hoping for a salvageable t (wanting a depot hack or four door convertible) my great uncle has a green tall t that's is MINT and after being around his some and enjoying the ones at Greenfield Village made me really want one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 07:30 pm:

Haven't heard of AeroFord, but there was the Taylor AeroCar in the 1950's. Ford wasn't even involved in flying cars, during the T days. Just the Ford Tri-Motor air craft.


And who could forget the 1970's Flying Pinto. Only one built and a crash took the inventor with it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 07:57 pm:

Actually, Ford did dabble with a small plane during the "T" era.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Flivver


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TJ Harris on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 08:03 pm:

Just a clarification aeroford isn't a flying vehicle it is a brand engineered model t (think of it like the Canadian meteors but in Europe) that was sold overseas and is supposed to have a different front end to make it different from the regular old ford model t.

Sad new my uncle (the one mentioned above) that got me interested in model ts (I was always a 1940s+ guy) passed away today. Sad day for the family but not unexpected.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 08:21 pm:

The aeroford was a british car 1920 1925 you may find pictures of it in the new british ford book than has come out lately.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 08:41 pm:

From Wiki:
The Aeroford was an English automobile that was manufactured in Bayswater, London from 1920 to 1925. The Aeroford was an attempt to make the Ford Model T more attractive by disguising its appearance with a unique bonnet and radiator grille.

The Aeroford sold from £288 in 1920 before dropping to £168 to £214 by 1925. It was available as a two-seater, four-seater or coupé model.

Not one photo to be found online.

Jim

The Aeroford had a distinctive body and radiator, and was made as a 2-seater, 4-seater and coupe, at prices 'from £288' in 1920, but dropping to £168-214 by 1925.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TJ Harris on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 09:52 pm:

That's exactly the info I found but other than that being mentioned on several sources not an ounce of info, I found a couple of brief mentions of them in books from way back in the 40s but not one single description, picture, or even crude drawing of what they look like.

I am the person people come to all the time to figure out what kind of car something is (try figuring out an Amc rambler at 2am going off just a vague description of the instrument cluster. After which they both said oh yeah it did say American motor company on the hubcaps) but this one has me stumped, it's like a unicorn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 10:19 am:

If the caps say american motors It would be 1966 and newer and if it is odd looking it is most likely a marlin Just a guess I own a 1967 Ambassador Convert. Cheers Colin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 10:30 am:

The Aerocar was featured in the James Bond film "The Man With the Golden Gun", here is a link to a page of trivia about the movie.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071807/trivia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 10:59 am:

Google Images usually comes up with at least a few relevant pictures, but not on this one. Lots of pictures, but no Aeroford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TJ Harris on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 12:15 pm:

The rambler was a 61-63 rambler American 2 door hardtop, it was in the process of being restored and was tore apart so it was in primer with no trim on it. The hubcaps had been replaced but you would think that information would have been included when they asked me. It's the one that has the speedometer that goes up by ones instead of tens and 1=10 2=20 3=30........

I only saw the car once briefly before the dealer got rid of it.

I emailed The Henry Ford Museum to see if they had any pictures of the Aeroford in their archives I figure if anybody this side of the ocean would have them it would be them or Peterson. If The Henry Ford Museum can't help I will try to contact Petersons and then work my way across to British museums.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TJ Harris on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 12:25 pm:

Well just heard back from the Henry Ford Museum their initial search showed nothing but if I want them dig into a little farther and have them search the archives it will cost me $35/hour and theirs no guarantee they will come up with something. I can't justify that right now so I will continue my search through other outlets for now (need to get back to the house and dig into my book collection to see if I can't find something there).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 06:03 am:

I think you should search in British sources about a British bodied Model T. Maybe there is something about it in the Encyclopedia of Motorcars by GN Georgiano? (can't get to my copy right now)

Here is a thread about another failed british attempt at selling a rebodied T in the same years, the Maiflower: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/268404.html?1329858868

The same horsepower tax calculated on cylinder diameter that slowed Model T sales in Britain in those years would also have affected the Aeroford, so likely very few AeroFords were sold.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 06:35 am:

I (and 2 co-authors) have just completed the second volume of 'The English Model T Ford' (available late spring), which covers things that happened to Ts after they left the factory - non-Ford-bodied trucks, buses, vans, railcars, tanks etc, plus accessories, owning and driving etc.
It has a whole chapter on coachbuilt British Model Ts. There are photos of Alberfords, Camou'fords, Maiflowers, Gordons, Offords, Scotts, Crewfords and others. But I never found a photo of an Aeroford - just the information quoted by Jim Thode, above.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TJ Harris on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 01:43 pm:

I am shocked at how difficult this has been to find, I just contacted Peterson Museum and I will let you know what I hear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Martin on Thursday, February 06, 2014 - 10:05 pm:

It is quite likely that very few, or even no, Aerofords were ever made. The early to mid-twenties was a time when everyone and his dog could have a go at setting up in the motor trade. It would have been easy enough for a budding coachbuilder or garage owner to register a name and even come up with suitable artwork to advertise a new car, but it is quite possible no orders were forthcoming. Many other tried and failed at the same time. Possibly a one-off was built, but given the survival rate of all British pre-war cars it is hardly surprising none survive and if the person (or people) behind the enterprise was not the best hustler in town there may also never have been photographs. I suspect a few will continue on a fruitless search, but knowing what research Chris Barker and a few of his colleagues in the UK have done, it would be 99% sure that if they can't find it, it doesn't exist. Whether it ever did, we may never know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Friday, February 07, 2014 - 02:36 am:

Here it is.....



Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration