Indiana side light-Photo and question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Indiana side light-Photo and question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 09:56 pm:

There has got to be some connection between these lights and the ones used during the black era model t days.
Do you suppose that the design was bought by Ford?
They are patented in 1909. Was that for the look or some special feature?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 10:38 pm:

The Pat date is older then the lamp and I think has to do with how the air entering the lamp and it's path going to the burner. This style of lamp from what I have seen came out around 1913 or maybe later and was sold to update the older cars.
There would be some more checking but Indiana may have been the name of a car. These lamps may have been made by Victor or Brown.
Hows that for a little guessing and a Western Auto Catalog! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, February 03, 2014 - 10:44 pm:

Actually you need to look at Connersville,Indiana. There was a lamp company there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 01:05 am:

http://www.coachbuilt.com/bui/c/central/central.htm

and

THE ANSTED INDUSTRIES.

The next stage in the industrial history of Connersville opens in the early nineties, when E. W. Ansted established a spring factory in the city. When he started his factory here in 1891 only vehicle springs were made and it was not until four years later that the manufacture of axles was added. The Ansted Spring and. Axle Company, the first of the many industrial plants established in Connersville by E. W. Ansted, has grown to be one of the largest plants of its kind in the United States. Starting with this one plant Mr. Ansted has established a series of industrial concerns in the city, all of which at the present time are correlated with the Lexington Howard Company.

The story of E. W. Ansted's connection with the industrial life of Connersville is the story of a man of unusual business ability. During the twenty six years he has been connected with the city he has undoubtedly done more for its industrial life than any one other man. For several years after coming to the city he devoted all his time to the manufacture of axles and springs for vehicles. It was not until 1898 that he began to extend his operations. In that year he organized the Central Manufacturing Company for the manufacture of vehicle wood work. In 1903 this plant began the manufacture of automobile bodies for the Cadillac Motor Car Company. In 1907 the company began to manufacture metal bodies for automobiles and is still engaged in that line of manufacture. They have added building after building in order to meet the demands of their increasing business and are now making metal automobile and buggy bodies, and selling only to manufacturers. The plant absorbed the Connersville Wheel Company in 1915. They make all the bodies for the Lexington-Howard Company and for a number of other automobile factories. It might be mentioned that the Connersville Wheel Company had a contract with the Empire Automobile Company of Indianapolis to construct cars for that concern and was thus engaged from 1912 until absorbed by the Central Manufacturing Company in the latter part of 1915.

The third industry started by Mr. Ansted was the Indiana Lamp Company which was incorporated in 1904 for the manufacture of automobile and vehicle lamps of all kinds. The lamps are sold through jobbers and automobile supply houses throughout the United States. In 1913 Mr. Ansted established the Lexington-Howard Company, which succeeded to the manufacture of Lexington cars, commenced by an earlier and less successful company in 1908. During the four years which this company has been in operation it has built up a business which has made the name of the Lexington car known all over the United States. This company, as has been stated, is the center of the group of Ansted industries in Connersville. The Lexington-Howard Company assembles the car, the parts of which are manufactured by the subsidiary plants composing the group. All the iron castings for the Lexington are made by the Hoosier Casting Company; the springs and axles come from the Spring and Axle Company; the tops from the Rex Manufacturing Company, while the lamps are the product of the Indiana Lamp Company and the hoods and fenders from the Metal Auto Parts Company, of Indianapolis, another Ansted company. Thus, many of the parts which go into the Lexington car are manufactured by the Ansted factories in Connersville. It is said there is no automobile that is so wholly under the supervision of one man as is the Lexington car.

The increased demand for the Lexington car during the past year made it necessary for all of the Ansted factories to increase their output. It was not so long ago that the Lexington-Howard Company was turning out only one car a day and two years ago the company was only producing an average of six cars daily. During 1916 the plant was enlarged so that it is now possible to produce twenty five cars daily and the company plans to produce at least seven thousand cars during 1917. Since the Lexington-Howard Company was organized in 1908, E. W. Ansted has been endeavoring to build up such a system of auxiliary plants in Connersville as would enable him to produce a high grade automobile at the lowest possible cost of production. It was in accordance with this plan, that he organized the Hoosier Casting Company in May, 1915, with a capital stock of $35,000, since increased to $100,000. This company is headed by W. H. DeVaney, who was formerly mechanical and production engineer with the Interstate Foundry of Cleveland, Ohio. The company makes automobile, stationary and marine engine castings and a general line of light and medium weight gray iron castings for all purposes. The company bought the plant and building, sixty by one hundred and thirty feet, of the old Connersville Safe and Lock Company. All the old machinery was cleared out and a new equipment consisting of a cupola, core of ovens, pattern shop and all molding accessories. At the end of seven months they built a brick and frame addition, sixty six by seventy five feet, and at the end of fourteen months from date of organization, the present building was started, which covers the entire square from Seventh to Eighteenth street. on the east side of Columbia avenue. The company now employ over two hundred men in the factory, exclusive of the office force and management. The products of the company are shipped to many important points in the United States, including North Tonawanda, New York: Detroit, Poughkeepsie, New York, and Chicago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDaniel(Indiana Trucks)Star City In on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 11:31 am:

I get an e-mail about two or three times a year asking if this is for an Indiana Truck but so far in 34 years of looking for parts for my truck and others, I have never seen any connection. Indiana Trucks were built in Marion Indiana so at least the lamp was not made by the same company. Kind of like the Indiana Tractor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 11:10 am:

I notice the Indiana lamps do not mount with a rear bolt do they side mount? I have about a dozen kerosene side lamps (I had to stop buying them) and only two or three are a match pair most of them are different manufacturers, I have Canadian and US (Detroit) models. I have at least three Canadian lamps that are different manufacturers. Except for one unit the doors all open sideways, one lamp opens from the top and swings down. I have a 15 touring but I don't have the brass trimmed lamps. I understand that there are models with cast brass trim and some with plated brass which is correct?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 12:16 pm:

I've never seen any cast brass trim on '15 Ford lamps, even the very early E&J #6 and #7 ones. All I've seen have the trim formed from sheet brass, not plated.

Some other car makes (Chevy, for one) used similar lamps which had nickel-plated brass trim. Ford was one of the last car manufacturers to switch from brass trim to nickel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Saturday, February 08, 2014 - 04:48 am:

I was surfing through and early post several years back and it was reported that, the style of lamp in the top of the post was used on the very early 15s the units that were built in 14 had the oil lamps with the diagonal doors. They were soon replaced with the top latching doors.


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