1919 Terminal block

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: 1919 Terminal block
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 04:27 pm:

Work in process. I'll add more photos as I proceed. I'll make an extra or two if someone needs one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 07:37 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 10:57 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Thursday, February 06, 2014 - 12:32 am:

Looks great Richard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Thursday, February 06, 2014 - 02:04 pm:

John, a question for you. Should the nuts be angled differently in the block? It made sense to me to angle them the way I did considering the horseshoe shape of the wire clips.
BTW, I made the holes a bit smaller than the nuts. Took a page from Art's book on that one. Because the Delrin is soft, the corners of the nuts made grooves. They seem tight without epoxy although I will still probably pin and epoxy them in place.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Thursday, February 06, 2014 - 04:18 pm:

First one finished. I want to do a couple more at least. One with the threaded inserts to see how that goes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Thursday, February 06, 2014 - 04:27 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Harper - Keene, NH on Thursday, February 06, 2014 - 06:12 pm:

Nicely done Richard! Huzzah!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Thursday, February 06, 2014 - 10:53 pm:

Work of art!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Friday, February 07, 2014 - 01:58 pm:

Here are the last photos. I used key locking threaded inserts vs the threaded hex nut. Not quite as authentic but work very well and are easy to install. Many thanks to those who commented and offered suggestions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Friday, February 07, 2014 - 02:06 pm:

Nice, Richard !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, February 08, 2014 - 09:27 am:

Richard: Don't you think the two mounting screws to the firewall would have been round head? Fantastic job. I've always wondered about those.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Saturday, February 08, 2014 - 11:30 am:

Larry, from the photo I see on p. 278 of Model T Ford by Mc Calley, they appear to be oval head screws. I have no other source of information on them. I used 7/8" oval head slotted screws and the size fit the one hole in the firewall that was not drilled through. The former owner installed a later terminal block and drilled though one of the mounting holes for the original piece.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 01:13 pm:

The terminal block screws were a #10-32 x 1/4" BUTTON head screw - steel - copper plated. It is factory number T2015. It is the same screw used to hold the cutout to the generator as well as the starting switch cover to bracket on the early switches. It also originally was the same screw that held the cover band to the brush end before they changed the design to use a single longer clamp screw. Button head is very similar to modern round head except typically a wee bit taller.

The terminal block to dash screw was factory number T2073 and it was in fact a #9 x 3/4" Round Head wood screw and was also the same screw that holds the choke bellcrank to the dash. It was Raven finish and later noted that it replaced T5243 as of 4/17/19.

Oval head screws require a countersink in the device they mount and there is no countersink called out on the terminal block drawing. If oval head screws were used there - the hole would have been shown on drawing with a countersink.

JFR note:

#9 screws were used just about everywhere on the dash and elsewhere from early brass era onward. #9 screws held the brass horns to the dash, the brass speedometer bracket was also held with #9 screws as were other plates and trims. It was a very common size screw and available in lots of different lengths. Sorry about that since it is not common today. If you ever wondered why #8 screws seem very loose as horn mounting and yet #10 won't fit the hole - now you know why. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 04:40 pm:

Thanks, John, for the valuable information. Looks like you were right, Larry.
The screws I used for the terminals that appear copper plated are round head silicon bronze. The shortest length I found was 3/8" I found both brass and zinc plated in 1/4" length. I don't know if you can find this size with a button head, however.
Because I already countersunk the blocks I made, I will stick with the 3/4" oval slotted head wood screws. If I make more I will use round head screws.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph Geisler on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 05:40 pm:

That second one, Richard, looks really good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 06:25 pm:

Thanks Joe, it was a lot easier to make than the first. I never used the key locking solid inserts before. They were a breeze to install.
I made a third terminal block, like the first, only I drilled the terminal holes smaller, 13/32" vs. 27/64". The delrin is soft enough that the edges of the nuts cut grooves in the delrin when pressed in. They are in there very tight and don't need reinforcement. I'll post a photo of that one. If I were to make a lot of them, I would experiment further to see if a even smaller hole would work. I bet it would. The benefit would be that the nut would fill the hole completely.


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