OT - "The City Of Adelaide" Clipper Ship

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT - "The City Of Adelaide" Clipper Ship
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 12:58 am:

The "City of Adelaide" (1864) and "Cutty Sark" (1869) are the last two clipper ships surviving in the world today.

The "Cutty Sark", now moored at Greenwich in England, is famous for carrying tea from China and wool from Sydney, Australia, to Britain.

The "City of Adelaide" is famous for being specially designed as a passenger ship. Over a quarter of a century from 1864-1886 the "City of Adelaide" carried English, Scottish, Cornish, German, Danish, Irish and other migrants to the Free Colony of South Australia.For our overseas readers all of the other colonies were penal settlements for the British Government where South Australia was not.


'City of Adelaide' (circled) in Port Augusta Harbour - ca1883; Source: State Library of South Australia. SLSA: B8532

In 1887 she left the England-Australia router and finally sailed her last cargo voyage in 1893. In 1923 she was sold to the Royal Navy, renamed HMS Carrick.

Many years passed in various guises. In 2007 an application was made to demolish the hull at her final resting place in the Scottish Maritime Museum at Irving. From there the people of South Australia have got behind the purchase of our piece of history and bring her home to Adelaide, South Australia.


Last week the "City of Adelaide" arrived on her special cradle at Dock 17 in Port Adelaide. Over the last couple of days she has been unloaded and placed temporarily in a fenced site for public viewing.

The Veteran Car Club of South Australia had a breakfast run this morning. Clashing with the "All British Day", 4 veterans decided to change the planned route and see "City of Adelaide" for ourselves. It is not often we have transport items older than our cars, but today we were outclassed by the grand old lady herself.

Please enjoy the photos and log on to www.cityofadelaide.org.au for the complete story.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Clipner-Los Angeles on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 01:48 am:

How cool is that .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Hunter on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 02:34 am:

Great story David, thanks for posting it.

Speaking as a New South Welshman, South Australia wasn't considered good enough for convict labour! :-)

Cheers, Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Trevan - Australia on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 04:25 am:

Thank you Paul.
Now i know why the TREVAN family left Cornwell to go South Australia and not to Victoria were the gold was more plentiful..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jamie Savannah Ga. on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 07:36 am:

Love to see these old clippers, here in Savannah they have been floating in our waters for a very long time. We still a few even these days.

The light house in my profile has been guiding them inbound and out bound since 1736. Of course the one in the pic is the third generation lighthouse


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jamie Savannah Ga. on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 07:47 am:

Correction fourth generation lighthouse


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 08:17 am:

Cool pictures and great looking cars David. Thanks for sharing. Even though I've sold my boat last year in favor of adding more T's to the fleet, I still have an interest in all things boating. We get a fleet of tall ships come into our Lake Erie area every so often, the grandest of them was last year to celebrate the 200th. anniversary of the Battle of Lake Erie from the War of 1812. Quite a display.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Stokes on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 03:40 pm:

What a wonderful story!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 04:00 pm:

About ten or fifteen years ago, there was an Australian trade promotion event here in St. Louis and the Ambassador came out to give the keynote speech. One of the things he spoke of was an American who had come to the embassy to apply for a visa to visit Australia. According to the Ambassador, when he came to the question, "Do you have a criminal record?" he wrote, "I didn't know it was still a requirement." :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 04:51 pm:

Our penal history gives Australia a certain distinction of its own. On the 2010 National 'T' Rally organised by the Model 'T' Ford Club of New South Wales we ventured on the Old North Road cut by convicts. The Penal Colonies of New South Wales were founded in 1788 and Tasmania in 1803. Anybody that visits Tasmania has to see Port Arthur, a surviving convict prison. Hence the term P.O.M.E, (pommie) meaning "Prisoner of Mother England" tattooed on every convict.

However, South Australia is unique amongst our interstate cousins. Although founded much later in 1836 we were free. Immigrants came to South Australia because they wanted to, not because they were sent.

South Australia was proclaimed a state by Governor Hindmarsh under a gum tree on 28th December, 1836, newly arrived on the HMS Buffalo.

That gum tree still survives today. We South Australians celebrate "Proclaimation Day" on 28th December every year and a special ceremony is held every year under the "Old Gum Tree".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Hunter on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 05:04 pm:

In all fairness to our South Australian cousins I have to say it is a loverly state, been there a few times now and enjoy motoring around. Adelaide is a beautiful city and the tram (trolley) trip out to Glenelg is well worth the journey.


When I, finally, get a T I have every intention of taking it over for the Bay to Birdwood run.

Cheers, Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 10:07 am:

In our visit to Australia in 1995, we had only a few hours to spend in Adelaide. We had lunch with a couple whose son and wife had a cattle station in the Outback. It was a very nice place that the tourists seem not to have discovered. Arriving on the Ghan from Alice Springs we were surprised to see so much green vegetation. If we get to Australia again, we will spend some time in Adelaide. Congratulations on rescuing your city's namesake ship. It looks like a little restoration work will be needed.


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