OT My other hobby: a cruel sport

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT My other hobby: a cruel sport
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 05:46 pm:

I like to spend these and watch the panic and confusion that ensues.


Today when I bought some celery and cereal and the total happened to be $3.45, so I handed the girl the two, the dollar, and the half. The poor thing was so flummoxed she got on the phone and called for help. While she waited for the manager she examined the bill very carefully, apparently trying to decide if it was real money. This one was quite young, but I've seen gray heads who ought to know stumped by these items.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 05:55 pm:

My neighbor (a joker) told me he asked at the bank if he could exchange Hawaiian money there. The young teller said no. American money only. I hope she didn't tell any co workers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 06:05 pm:

Steve, Yup using that kinda currency here at the local seven eleven would generate a similar response.

Around twenty years ago a gold mining company operating here in the California Mother Lode paid their employees in two dollar bills to show the local economy how much the mine contributed to the local economy. It definitely got the point across.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 06:28 pm:

Steve,

Love your wicked sense of humor.
I would love to see the reaction to a silver or gold certificate.....

Or even the big bills of the early 20th Century.

Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 06:42 pm:

"I got a hot rod Ford and a two-dollar bill..."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 06:43 pm:

Two of my favorite forms of currency, the two dollar bill and the one dollar coin, I still have a few Ikes that get spent from time to time. A bit of trivia, the One dollar coin with Sacajawea's portrait is the only coin with a person from Idaho on it, actually two, Sacajawea and Randy'L Teton who posed for the portrait.
The dollar coin got a bad rap from the Susan B. dollar, but it was designed to be a failure to defame Susan B. Anthony by making it look so much like the quarter that it would not succeed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 06:45 pm:

By the way, I try to keep a few Hawaiian notes around to show people. I have a friend from Hawaii who invited me to her sons weddings, I gave them both a $1 Hawaiian note, they did not know that the Hawaiian notes existed, well the older one did not, the younger one was waiting for his when he got married.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 06:54 pm:

I used go to the southern states several years back when the Canada/U.S. cash exchange rate was really bad. While in a store or restaurant, I would show some of the locals my "fancy, pretty", Canadian money. They would literally run around screaming while showing it to their friends. I would make their day by trading them for their plain looking American bills, at par of course. That helped pay for my trips. Everyone came away happy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 07:42 pm:

Steve,

Around here the rapid transit train department went unattended entrance and exit gates. The tickets are bought by a vendomat that takes a plain piece of paper and coats it with a q-code. You swipe it at a scanner as you pass through and the gate jaws open for you....

Some idiotic $%^$%^$%^$ came up with the bright idea that no matter what you put into the vendomat as paper money, your change would always be in coin and they just love to use the Sacajawea. They also refuse debit card or credit card input unless it is one issued by them, and I refuse to do that. (They recently changed the parking over to card only...theirs of course...so that's another issue).

Heaven forbid the only thing you have is a 20 for a 4 buck round trip ticket :-)

I use to fret and take exact change to not have to think about the Sacajawea problem...then like Steve eventually decided they were entertaining and ALWAYS feed the vendomat a 20 :-):-) makes the next day or so quite interesting and entertaining as I pass the Sacajawea off...somewhere I think I still have a box of half-dimes....and 2 cent pieces...they are probably worth more than face value by a bunch but would be fun to pull the legal tender trick with someone who needs the register to tell them the change required :-(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 08:48 pm:

I sure wouldn't spend the half dimes or 2¢ coins. Depending on condition, their values range from $10 to several thousand.

A couple of years ago ABC News did a story on the millions of dollars in dollar coins that had been minted but weren't being used. The tone of the story was, "Oh dear, the government has wasted your tax dollars making all these unused coins." Of course, this was exactly backwards. If Congress had any sense (Ha!) they'd do away with the paper bills altogether and make only coins for the $1 denomination. The paper bills wear out and have to be replaced in a year and a half. The coins last at least thirty years. In fact, I get quarters nearly fifty years old in change all the time. They're wasting millions printing the paper $1 bills instead of just using the coins.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 10:03 pm:

Steve,

I teach a Thurs. evening class at Cerritos Community College every Fall semester. I alternate between Model Making and Industrial Design. Part of my curriculum covers silicone mold making.

One of my former students was having problems with her molds and needed my advice. Since she lives in Orange County and I'm in L.A. County, I'm not real familiar with that part of town, so I took my wife's car with the navigator.

Of course it brought me straight to the toll roads. Since I didn't want a big fat ticket and didn't have a toll road transponder, I rolled up to the automated toll booth. $1.75 please.

I reached into my pocket to find $1.20 in coins and three $20 bills. So, in went a twenty and out came 1 1\2 truckloads of $1.00 coins as change.

After three pounds of metal had jingled around in my pocket for two days, I made a run to the supermarket. After a profuse apology to the lovely little checker, she took the coins with a smile! She said she loved getting those things! I was shocked. I figured I'd get a dose of the ole stink-eye. The glass truly is half-full.

Mike.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 10:12 pm:

I think that it is possible that the US is the only major country using paper for a denomination as small as the dollar. Canada uses coins up through two dollars, the eurozone uses coins up through two euros, Britain uses coins up through two pounds, etc.

Steve has nailed it. If they stopped making dollar bills, people would start using dollar coins. As long as they make the bills, the coins will never catch on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Katy, Texas on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 10:56 pm:

There's a scrap metal business in Houston, C and D Scrap metal, that still advertises that they pay in Two Dollar bills. I prefer to hand a clerk a "twee dollar bill" with Bill Clinton's picture on it and before they call the law, say, I'm just kidding".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 11:57 pm:

The Canadian coin on the left is affectionately known as a "Loonie", the one on the right is a "Toonie". They are in widespread use.

Pretty coins, eh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Colin Mavins on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:57 am:

There is a good thing about 1 and 2 dollar coins, when you come home from work and you dump your change in the bucket, after three months you have 200 hundred dollars or more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 02:35 am:

I have heard the Canadian two dollar coin called a doub'loone for double loonie.
I am not sure if it is still possible, but the mint was trying to get rid of $1 coins a while back, and you could order any amount in $1,000 increments with a credit card, and the shipping was free. People found that they could get a % cash back from their card company, or sky miles. One fellow ordered $50,000, and took a vacation on the points after taking the coins to his bank and depositing them in his account, where they were returned to the mint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 08:53 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 09:14 am:

Back about 60 years ago, I used to get my paycheck cashed in either or both two dollar bills and silver dollars just for the reaction I would get when I spent it! Those two's were "silver certificates" and the coins were real silver of the "peace" or "morgan" variety. I wish I had some of those now. In those days people apologized for the silver dollars because of the weight! When I was even younger, a friend of my dad's gave me a silver dollar. I would roll it on the floor and one day it fell down a crack between two boards in the floor. I wanted to pull up the boards, but my dad wouldn't let me. So I know where one of them is. Someone else owns the house and I'm sure they are unaware of that dollar. I think I could get it out with something like two table knifes because it was standing upright with the top just below the floor level! Well maybe someday when the old house is torn down, someone will find it!
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald G Victory on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 09:21 am:

I have been restoring cars for about 10 years. Whenever I am about to finish the interior, I always get a silver dollar from the same year as the car and hide it under one of the rear side panels. Not sure what good this does (has yet to increased the value), but I still feel good knowing that some day someone might be restoring it again, and come across the coin. And no one can say one of my restorations is of no value.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 09:47 am:

Donald, That is a pretty wonderful Coupe in your profile.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 11:59 am:

Hey Norman,
You are much older than I thought, the last two dollar silver certificate issued was the 1917 note issued until the size of the bills were reduced to the size we use now, in 1928. Most two dollar bills that people saw before the new ones were United States Notes, the US notes had red seals and numbers, silver certificates had blue seals and numbers, there are a few exceptions, the Hawaiian notes were silver certificates, but had brown seals and numbers with the black overprint. The North African notes were silver certificates with blue numbers but yellow seals, not to be confused with gold notes that had yellow numbers and seals. The current two dollar bills are Federal reserve notes and have green numbers and seals.
Best
Gus


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:00 pm:

terry woods, one scrap yard near me used to always pay cash, and always 2 dollar bills when it worked out that way. now with all the copper theft every one pays with a check, id required, and a photo of your truck on the scale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:05 pm:

Opps, I was wrong, the 1917 two was also a United States note, the last $2 Silver certificate was of the 1899 series.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:15 pm:

I still can remember my grandfather tossing a hand full of silver coins into the foundation cement when the family built the last home they lived in. I can also remember my grandfather nailing a tree top to the crowd of the roof during construction too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way, Wa. on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:21 pm:

STEVE
I WOUNDER WHAT THE YOUNG LADY WOULD HAVE SAID IF YOU HAD HANDED HER THIS 1917 2 DOLLAR ISSUE.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Sullivan, Powell WY on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:48 pm:

Last summer, for our Canadian users, we introduced in our point of sale software settings designed to accommodate the elimination/retirement of the Canadian penny. No doubt, you are looking at the future in the U.S. also....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:53 pm:

Here is a two dollar Silver certificate from 1896, one of the Educational series, it has Fulton and Morse on the back,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:55 pm:

Here is the 1899 silver Certificate


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:56 pm:

The only thing keeping the US cent in production is our love for Abraham Lincoln. If somebody else were on the coin it would have been retired years ago.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 12:56 pm:

The 1914 National Currency note


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 01:04 pm:

Here is my favorite $5 bill the 1899 Silver Certificate


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 01:06 pm:

And my favorite $10 the United States Note of 1901


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 01:11 pm:

If you really want to mess with people, try paying with an 1863 3 cent note, it is still worth face value!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 01:14 pm:

Steve, Interesting that the first year of the lincoln head penny was the same as the first year of the Model T Ford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 01:49 pm:

Ah, another drift...

You all may have noticed that they stopped putting proper fungicide in tabbed roof shingles a long while back. Had something to do with codes calling for 240#/square tabbed shingles and 'oops' the ones with fiberglass could only weigh in at 210# for the same stone load. Sooo...they kicked up the limestone content of the binder material to 'make weight'...costs more to ship, heavier to lift, extra limestone does absolutely nothing as to shingle life...except...lets those black stains grow because the mildew-cide costs more than the limestone!

They say that the way to prevent the black stain is to run a strip of copper or zinc along the top course on a roof and the rain will wash enough molecular metal down the shingles to prevent the groady black from even starting or getting a foothold.

I figured out one day that a row of pennies, new or old, laid end to end with silicone formed a 'strip' that was cheaper than any commercial actual strip was to buy! Sure takes longer to put up but lots of us have time on our side anymore. I haven't done it yet but when the shed needs its next roof, I think it could make an interesting conversation piece...and the shingles will never stain!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 01:50 pm:

Gus,
You might be right. Maybe it was a U.S note. It's been a long time since I have seen one. I am not a coin or currency collector. I just did that for the effect it had on those people where I did business. The time period was in the early 1950's. At that time it was not unusual to find coins from the 1800's or early 20th century in circulation. In 1943 the U.S. mint coined Zinc pennies. People didn't like them because when new they were shiny and people mistook them for dimes. Now they are a collectors item! The Susan Anthony dollars are likewise similarly mistaken for quarters because the color is the same and they are only slightly larger than a quarter.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 03:08 pm:

Hey George,
You need to check the dates on the pennys, as the new one are zinc again but with a very thin plating of copper.
Hey Norman,
I remember buying my lunch tickets at school in the 60s with silver dollars from the 1880s, we seldom saw a one dollar bill around here. I can remember in school, coating copper pennies with mercury to make them silver,I bet that does not happen much as school anymore!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 03:55 pm:

Those 1943 pennies were steel with a coat of zinc. For us old persons, they were a common part everyday change.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 04:05 pm:

Save your confederate money, boys - some of them has raised to be worth something:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/TT-1861-50-CONFEDERATE-STATE-NOTE-T-6-RICHMOND-PCGS-58-P PQ-GREAT-EMBOSSING-/310853803393


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 05:12 pm:

Thought I'd throw a "Sawbuck" into the mix.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 05:27 pm:

I think somewhere I may still have a Confederate replica bill that was given away in cereal boxes about sixty years ago. One of the bills in Roger's link looks like it may be one of those. It's currently at $7.50, while all the others are priced in the hundreds.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 05:32 pm:

Wow, Jay, that is a very nice example of a Demand Note, and even though it is a New York note, it still is a great find.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 05:37 pm:

Hey Steve,
It is still possible to get decent examples of the more common CSA bills for less than a movie and dinner. Condition is the key, most CSA note are in very poor condition partly because of the quality of paper, but mostly because they were not cared for. The expensive note in Roger's link is in crisp condition, if a person was to fold it once, it would remove half of the value.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 05:44 pm:

Wonder if these would still work at a PX or on Armed Forces Day visits to a base ?????



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 05:53 pm:

I liked the hobby aspect of it better when silver value
peaked about April or May of 2011.
Took a coin dealer $100 Can. face value of 1966 and earlier
well worn 10 cent coins and got a cheque for $2500. in return.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 06:36 pm:

Sorry George, your note was devalued on the 21st of October 1968 and would have been replaced with series 661 if you had still been on base.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mat Klemp on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 07:01 pm:

A few years ago I received a steel penny in my change at McDonalds. They thought it was a dime.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 07:47 pm:

Earlier in this thread, I posted regarding trading fancy Canadian money for plainer but more valuable American cash. Sometimes it works the other way around. In Cuba, they have two kinds of currency. One is for the locals and the other is for the tourists. The tourist money is plain looking but it is worth double what the locals get. The local bills and coins however, have the image of Che Guevara on them. The locals know you want them as souvenirs so, as soon as you step off the tour bus in any town, there is a lineup of little old men who can't speak english, holding their cash in your face looking to trade for tourist pesos. Some of them probably make a full time living doing this. Here is the coin I got.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 08:23 pm:

I have been sorting copper pennies for about 3 years now. Every week I get 25.00 worth of pennies at the bank. I bought a "comparator" on e-bay for about 20.00. They use them in vending machines to sort the coins and eject bogus stuff. There is a slot in the "comparator" that you insert a coin. In my case a copper penny. It use that coin to compare to all the coins passing thru the "comparator" As coins drop thru the "comparator" it sends copper pennies out one side and anything else out the other side. A copper penny is worth about 2 to 3 cents each depending on the copper price. I was finding about 50% copper when I started It is aprox. 25% to 30% at this time. You are at least doubling your money on the ones you find at this time and return the rest to the bank. Most people do not realize that almost all vending companies put dozens of the "comparators" in there machines. They sort the coins for silver coins. It is amazing how much silver is still out there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob from Nova Scotia on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 08:26 pm:

I got a mittfull of Cuban currency last year. Neat having two sets of currency!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 08:27 pm:

In 1970, I was living and working in Holland. A couple of the women from my office said that they had signed up for a two-week tour in the (then) Soviet Union, so I decided to go along. Five days in Leningrad and eight days in Moscow. While there, it was stressed to us that it was illegal to take currency out of the country. That was pretty much all the challenge I needed.

These came out hidden in the bottom of my toilet kit:




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 08:35 pm:

That's pretty cool Dick. That last bill looks great. Taking currency out of Cuba is illegal as well. I hope when I go back, Fidel doesn't send me to a Cuban prison for taking one coin. I don't dance well with Senore Bubba.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John E Cox on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 08:55 pm:

Back to the two dollar bill.
When I was in the Navy in 1958/59. On board the USS Yorktown they would pay us in cash with two dollar bills. on the hanger deck an officer with two armed petty officers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Clipner-Los Angeles on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 11:36 pm:

How about a gen-u-wine Yankee Greenback


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 12:53 am:

More thread drift- I'm amazed no one has mentioned Australian money.

First the smallest note is $5. Its a purple color. every other note also is a different color to the others and they vary enough in size for blind people to be able to determine what they have. They progress to $10, $20,$50, $100. The notes are plastic so are waterproof, and extremely hard to tear. They also have a clear window and a hologram in them. Fakes are very rare.

There is a $1 coin and a $2 coin (both are gold in color) as well as 50 cents, 20cents 10 cents, 5 cents. That's it, no lower denominations. Sales are rounded up or down to the closest 5 cents, if it comes to 1,2 cents its down to the closest amount 3 and above its rounded up to the next amount.

We lost our smaller coins years ago and it sure helps to have less coins to deal with in your pockets, I find it annoying when in America to have heaps of 1 cent pieces after even a short spending spree.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 01:09 am:

Let's drift a little more. Peter's mention of different colors reminds me of a story a Mexican friend told me in Cuernavaca. In Mexico La Mordida (the bite) is a long established tradition. Poorly paid police are often on the take. The story goes that a driver was stopped by a traffic cop for speeding. He asked the officer if there was some way he could take care of the incident without getting a ticket. "¿De que color son mis ojos?" (What color are my eyes?) asked the cop. He had blue eyes, so the driver handed him a blue fifty peso note. "No soy tuerto" (I'm not a one-eye), said the cop. So the driver handed him another fifty and the officer waved him on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 02:49 am:

No plastic notes yet here in Sweden, but we've rationalised all the lower denominations off some years ago so now tho smallest coin is the crown, equal to about 15 US cents. Sales are rounded off and noone really misses the small coins. If you pay with a card the actual amount is drawn, though - digital decimals doesn't clutter up your pockets ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 05:39 am:

I got a $5.00 bill off the slop sled as change once...it looked kind of funny, the green was too green and the black was really black. I thought I had gotten funny money and almost went to the bank to make sure. Until I read the small print that said..."redeemable unto the bearer on demand in gold"...of course five dollars worth of gold wouldn't amount to much these days, even if you could use it to redeem it, lol.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 06:28 am:

A few years ago - I was fortunate to meet Chet Krause when I hauled part of his military collection to California.

Chet Krause is a legend in the numismatic hobby.

I did not know who he was.

I sat and had coffee with him - then he took me to see his latest catalog effort.

He was documenting State issued bank notes for an upcoming publication.

Later - I walked the streets of Iola, WI where I learned who he really was from the local town folk.

One of the most interesting and genuine people I have ever met ....:-)



Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 07:53 am:

Not to make this political…please, just for fun…for most of that fiscal history reflected above the paper money ‘notes’ were that…paper and promises…and about 50% of the currency in use was backed by real gold and real silver "the certificates".

The USA was able to peg and control the price of the precious metal due to volume it had accrued and threats to flood the market for price control if someone made a run on it. I don’t know, I didn’t live through the era but sounds sort of ‘sound’ as other than the Great Depression, when would a bank or rather the quest for real value (the gold and/or silver) hit 50%? Sweet deal…50% of the money had no depth…but confidence and a government promise let the float equal the real.

Today it is rumored that Ft. Knox is emptied and all currency bills being ‘notes’ have no more stamina behind them other than the government promise that they should be good enough to accept as ‘legal tender’, meaning nothing more than the next guy should accept it at par.

It sort of reminds me of the following story and lesson…

It's a slow day in the small town of Pumphandle and the streets are deserted. Times are tough, everybody is in debt, and everybody is living on credit.

A tourist visiting the area drives through town, stops at the hotel, and lays a $100 bill on the desk saying he wants to inspect the rooms upstairs to pick one for the night.

As soon as he walks upstairs, the hotel owner grabs the bill and runs next door to pay his debt to the butcher.

(Stay with this..... and pay attention)

The butcher takes the $100 and runs down the street to retire his debt to the pig farmer...

The pig farmer takes the $100 and immediately heads off to pay his bill to his supplier, the Co-op...

The guy at the Co-op takes the $100 and runs to pay his debt to the local prostitute, who has also been facing hard times and has had to offer her "services" on credit.

The hooker rushes to the hotel and pays off her room bill with the hotel Owner...

The hotel proprietor then places the $100 back on the counter so the traveler will not suspect anything...
.
At that moment the traveler comes down the stairs, states that the rooms are not satisfactory, picks up the $100 bill and leaves.

No one produced anything. No one earned anything. However, the whole town now thinks that they are out of debt and there is the beginning of an atmosphere of optimism and glee.

And that, my friends, is how a "government stimulus package" and “leadership in economic growth” works!

My T’s won’t get me through retirement but at least they are tangible with a resale at some level :-):-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 08:38 am:

Yesterday afternoon I went to home depot. the cashier had to open a new roll of quarters and when she dumped them into the drawer they sounded different I looked at the 2 quarters and they were 1959 and 1960. I immediately offered her $10.00 for the remainder of the quarters she just put in the drawer she agreed all of the quarters were poor to good from 1955 to 1963 even at melt value that's a good deal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 10:13 am:

G.R. There is nothing like the sound of a silver coin hitting the deck! Good find!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 11:31 am:

When I buy something, I use only paper money. Coins I receive in change go on my dresser. When we go out to dinner, I pick up a handful of coins any or all denominations from my dresser and put them into a small coin purse. We leave them on the table for a tip,usually in addition to a few paper dollars. That's how I deal with coins in the U.S.A.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 12:32 pm:

I don't know much about money but here's my two cents worth.



Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 12:54 pm:

Richard, I hope those weren't in your pocket when they got hammered like that!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 01:39 pm:

No Jay, I picked them up off the street. I don't have enough cents to leave them there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 01:55 pm:

Back when you could buy a burito for under 2 bucks at TacoBell, a friend stopped by one to grab a quick snack. The cost was something like $1.79 & my friend only had a 2 dollar bill and a 50 dollar bill in his wallet. He handed over the 2 to pay & the kid said "we can't take that." When asked why, the kid said "because it's not real money." My friend decided to push it & finally the kid called the manager, who was also clueless. They threatened to call the mall security if he didn't leave, to which he encouraged them to do just that. When the off-duty cop showed up, the manager told him my friend was trying to pass counterfiet money. The cop walked up to my friend to get his side of the story & upon seeing the 2 dollar bill, the cop just shook his head & said to the manager "this is why you'll be stuck at a TacoBell the rest of your life!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 03:56 pm:

Funny Money ! One of my favorite topics.

To Mr. Cox, when I was in the USAAC (US Army Air Corps) and the USAF (US Air Force, we were paid in cash, once a month. The Paymaster did it all by hand, if our Squadron had a Day Room, it took place there, but it could be done in a tent, a Barracks or almost any covered area. He would be sitting at a table with the cash in piles in front of him, separated by denomination. We would be lined up outside by name, and allowed to enter one at a time, by name, by an armed Soldier. The Paymaster had a Soldier on each side, armed with Thompsons. After the usual saluting, name, rank, and serial number, he would count it out to you. I have no idea as to who kept up whether or not you were on Flying Status, but it always came out right.


Mr. Bryngelson posted a picture of my favorite currency, the 1889 Silver Certificate, the $5.00 one. It was, and is, a beautiful note, and was larger in size than the other paper money. I was given one of these back in the 1930's as a Christmas gift, more money than I had ever seen, and more than I would see for a long time afterward. I kept that thing in my billfold until some time in the late 1950's, had fell on some really hard times, and finally had to spend it, have always regretted it.

The $2.00 bills are a story unto themselves. My Brother was the first in the family to have a good job, it included an expense account. He would take all the extra money out after expenses in $2.00 bills. Everyone knew him because of that. I did the same thing for a long time when I was on an expense account, they were really not that uncommon back then, I would hate to try and pass one now.

Silver dollars, again, a wonderful memory. I always carried at least one, usually more. At the time, they were common, but when working in the Rockies, one seldom got a paper dollar, it was usually silver, wish we would go back to them. We used to always bring a handful of silver dollars home for the kids. An old Boss of mine paid my expenses in the Anthony dollars one time, did it for devilment, he knew my feelings about her.

I carried my Masonic coin for many, many years, I have lost it in my old age, and it bothers me still. When I used to pay out in a Café or such, I would usually take all my change out at one time, a handful, and the Cashiers always wanted to know what it was, or the silver one. Some of the Cashiers had a Husband or such who was a Mason, and would recognize it for what it was.
I still pick up pennies off the street, I think anyone who was raised back then does.

This was a really good posting, I thought, didn't know anyone still knew about money or even cared about the old stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 04:22 pm:

Grady, your story about the coin reminded me of the old story about a young single man who was on a business trip. After a long day, he stopped in the hotel bar for a beer and to unwind. He struck up a conversation with an attractive young woman in the bar and they seemed to be hitting it off pretty well. About the time he was thinking that the evening was showing promise, she saw his Masonic ring and said, "Oh, I love your ring. My dad has one just like it." Oops. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 06:38 pm:

In 1972 I flew to Europe when I was 17, I was going through security when the medal detector buzzed on my pocket, I had 20 Eisenhower dollars in it at the time. The security guard asked me what was in my pocket, and being a dumb farm boy, I reached into it to show him. I was plastered against the wall so fast I did not know what happened. When they discovered what had set of the detector, the guard told me "in the future, when some one asks you what you have in your pocket, tell them do not try to show them" It was a very good lesson. On the return flight from London, I approached the security check with a revolver and a bayonet in my hand. I handed them to the security guard and said I would like to check them with the pilot. He took them and put them in an envelope and handed it to a stewardess and gave me a quick search with a medal detector. The got a good buzz of a shoulder bag, and asked what was in it. I was smarter, I told them I was not sure, but maybe it was my camera. That was good enough and let me board.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 07:01 pm:

I'm still slightly off topic, being Australian my knowledge of USA currency is poor but I had an interesting conversation when in Los Angeles a while ago. A friend and I were heading to Hershey and spent a night in LA with a family who had billeted his daughter when she went there for a basketball competition.

The father worked for the Secret Service. His job was to help guard the President when he visited the area. He had numerous photo's around the house with himself and Ronald Regan and George Bush Sr.

When the President was not in town his job was to track down printers of fake currency. He explained it was relatively easy.

First any ink the color of that used in notes required the ink seller to notify the FBI. The same applied to the paper especially if a reasonably large purchase was made.

The buyers had to supply identification and most were caught out when the two supplies were matched together.

The other easy way to catch people trying to use the counterfeit money was that they most often would go to a bar or other place and purchase a drink. When they ordered the second drink they produced another one instead of using some of the change they had been given.

He stated that on any day banks in LA alone received several thousand fake notes. At the time there were three different printing plates being used by groups producing notes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 08:38 pm:

Hey Peter,
I think there was one thing that was wrong with his story, no one can buy the type of paper used in US currency, it is not available (no I do not know this from trying)
It is also illegal to reproduce US notes in the correct size, those reproduce here are scanned at a very low resolution to avoid a visit from your friend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 03:21 pm:

The company that makes the paper for US currency is Crane & Company, founded in Dalton, MA in 1801. They've been supplying the Federal Reserve with paper since 1879.

Federal Law allows reproduction of paper money as long as it is either bigger or smaller in size, but not the same size. Also, printing both the back and front of a bill on the same piece of paper will get you a lengthy prison sentence.

A 12 year old kid did community service work for me 15 years ago, because he and his friend were reproducing Twenties front and back on his mothers color copier.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 05:31 pm:

Should have written that differently, there are papers similar to that used by the US treasury ( one in particular seemingly) close enough to maybe pass muster, from memory the same applied to the ink.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Mullis on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 05:44 pm:

Steve
I copper plated some 1943 steel pennies and spent them. Cruel, I know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John E Cox on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 08:45 pm:

When I was much to young to have any, probably around 10, I asked a friends father, a chemist, that worked at the salinity lab in Riverside if he could get me a little Mercury to use to make switches for a project that I thought I might do. He brought home for me a bottle with the cork top and funny paper label like I later used in High School Chemistry.
Back to money. We used it for all kinds of things
including coating pennies to look like dimes.
I don't think that we ever tried to pass them as dimes.
About secret service Guys. I new a young man at my old airport in Riverside who was a secret service agent. Sounds sinister but he was harmless I think. He drove a nice late model Corvette and opened the trunk one day and I noticed a big stack of license plates. He explained that he was working on counterfeiting
and had the plates so he could switch them and confuse the bad guys.
I asked him why they used 9mm pistols when the FBI was using 10mm. He said that they didn't want the bullets to go through the assassins and hurt some one in the crowd that was usually involved when such things happen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Danial - Veneta OR US Earth Solar System on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 01:28 am:

@ MIchael Mullins - that is cruel!

Here's my latest metal detector find. Not worth a lot but a first for me in over 40 years of detecting:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 10:29 am:

In my early days, I think everyone was into collecting pennies. I used to go to a bank and buy a sack of pennies, couldn't have been much in value because I was so broke I couldn't pay attention.

Me and the Wife would sit on the floor and go through them, one at a time, our eyes were good back then, and we could get up and down. When we had gone through that sack, we would take it back to the Bank and they would trade out. It was cheap thrills, didn't cost much because you didn't really find much, so you were just trading sacks as it were.

I worked with a young man in the 1960's, who was single, so he could afford it, and was pretty big into collecting. He put me onto the 1950D Nickel, and would give you a quarter for one, we thought it was a good deal. He would go through our Petty Cash box, and go through the change at the Cafe where we always ate, he found a lot of stuff.

He was traveling to see his folks one time, had a whole bunch of his coins with him to store with them, had a wreck that killed him, and the coins all disappeared, sad.

My Grandparents raised me, My Mom's Mom had a tiny Country Store, one room, about 20 x 20, had the Post Office and all there, she had a small canvas "Money Sack" that she had been using for God only knows how long with probably less than $10.00 in it, the money was just used over and over, one of my Aunts got the bag when she died, had a lot of good stuff in it, including some Confederate money that had been handed down by the original owners, my Ancestors.

Another Aunt worked at Scarboroughs in Austin for many and many a year, she would trade out for all the Indian Head pennies that came through, they were fairly common then, I picked up a few myself in change.

The only "Gift" my Granddaddy ever gave me, but he fed me and gave me a Home, was a small leather coin purse with three of the Indian Heads in it, I still have it and the coins and would not trade for anything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael sharkey on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 10:59 am:

One of the newest additions to my collection. Most of the people I show it to have a hard time believing that there was an Indian chief on our five dollar bill.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 02:40 pm:

George,

You forgot one additional principle -- the $100 paid to the butcher is revenue and taxes are owed on it; likewise the pig farmer, the co-op, the prostitute (well, maybe not her!) and the hotel owner. So the govt wins as it is owed taxes on $500!

And that's how it REALLY works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 05:06 pm:

Hey Michael, you need to ask them which bill had Martha Washington's picture on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 05:23 pm:

In Australia, our old paper notes and the polymer notes now in use, came in different colours and sizes to make them easily identifiable. Our blind disabled use a device which allows them to sort notes in sizes so they know what they have. These they sort so they know what they hand over the counter. I asked a US friend how blind people get on with US notes. His best reply was 'Would you rob a blind person?'

I find I have to be very careful with US notes to avoid handing over the wrong amount. The most annoying thing is having a wallet full of notes, but most of them being dollar bills. The opposite applies here. A pocketful of loose change can have real value, having brass one and two dollar
coins. These I consign to my piggy bank at the end of the day and the savings soon mount up. Now, if you go to the wrong bank, they want to charge you for counting them!!!!

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Friday, February 14, 2014 - 10:34 am:

Hey Allan,
We had a blind kid in the neighbourhood years ago, he always got new banknotes at the bank, he could feel the denomination with his fingers. I can remember Europeans asking me how we could tell our notes apart, and with out trying to be smart, I replied "they have the amount printed on them". It is the norm here, and we do not even think about it, but seeing notes of different colours and sizes is a bit odd for us.
Best
Gus


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