From "Photos I like", a website

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: From "Photos I like", a website
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 09:00 pm:

Just got this in an email:
http://photosilke.blogspot.com/2013/03/historic-photos.html

55 66 91 and 97 have cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, February 09, 2014 - 10:18 pm:

It always impresses me the quality of the lenses of the cameras in those days. If you look at the photos they are in perfect focus across the entire picture. I could look at photos of this era all day long.

The photo of the Wills St Claire shows the quality and depth of the paint and finish. Hard to imagine how they could produce a finish of that quality with the crude material and equipment of that era.

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 02:47 am:

Brasscarguy, Many of the cameras of the time did not have optic lenses, but utilized a pinhole aperture, this gave a greater depth of field but a very slow shutter time. As far as the material and equipment of the period, much of what we use now would not pass muster in those days.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 03:04 am:

It's not the lens as much as the emulsion.
The old silver nitrate emulsion was extremely fine grained and gave resolutions I'm not sure can be achieved even by modern cameras.
That's why you can take most old photo postcards, scan them at a high resolution, blow them up to a foot wide and still have a remarkable image....... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 09:41 am:

Yup, it was the emulsion. Back in the 70's when Mel Brooks decided to shoot "Young Frankenstein" in black & white, he found that the standard non-color movie film stock of the day just didn't have that beautiful "glow" with which we all had became familiar in the movies of Hollywood's golden age.

If I remember correctly, Brooks had a special run of the old recipe silver nitrate film produced at considerable cost—and cinematographer Gerald Hirschfeld
did succeed beautifully in reproducing that magic style of lighting and imagery.

Some folks feel that the soul of the photographic art was irrevocably lost in the digital age. In some ways, I think I have to agree.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 01:31 pm:

Emulsion has nothing to do with depth of field, there were still high quality films available until the digital cameras took over, but most people wanted the convenience of high speed over high resolution.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 01:40 pm:

Ships and other modes of transportation have changed very much over the last 150 years. Women's clothing has changed much more than mens.

However, Navy uniforms have changed very little during that time.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 03:58 pm:

The photos of the Oregon caught my eye. Hum wonder why? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 04:37 pm:

Hey Norm,
You are wrong about Navy uniforms, in the 40s, they started using zippers. actually, it takes an expert to date a Navy uniform, and oddly enough, nearly all navys of the world use a very similar uniform. Here is a German uniform from WWI, there was a blue counterpart like the US Navy too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 05:44 pm:

Have you ever tried to unzip a salty zipper?


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