Be cautious of scams

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Be cautious of scams
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Merle O. Tanner on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 10:11 pm:

Attention : I was contacted by a scam artist .
The name used was " Corey John". I have an ad
on the club classified.
The " dirt ball" that attempted the scam expressed
an interest in buying my model T project and
the scam started with an explanation that he
was out at sea and worked as a maritime engineer
and he could only pay by Paypal. He explained
he hired someone to pickup the auto but he needed
me to pay the car hauler by a Western Union money gram sent to an address in North Carolina.and that he would send
extra money along with the money to buy my auto.
He sent a fictious email that looked like it came from
Paypal. Although it went to my email Spam. The fictious
Paypal email stated I had to pay the car hauler before
my money for the auto would be released to me.
I contacted Paypal and they confirmed this was
a scam is is call "Phishing".

Be cautious this"Dirt ball" may try scamming
someone else with the Model T Club.
Merle Tanner


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 10:20 pm:

They keep trying because occasionally a sucker takes the bait.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Monday, February 10, 2014 - 10:23 pm:

Merle,
That would have been really nice of you to pay for the shipping for someone to steal your car. It takes all kinds and you have to be careful.
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 09:17 am:

Glad you caught that Merle. Lord knows there's getting to be more scammers than ever. Pretty soon the good guys will be outnumbered by the bad guys.
I see from your profile you appear to be new to MTFCA, if not to the hobby itself. Either way, welcome aboard!
And as others also say to "us newbies"-welcome to the affliction. I still think I'm new as only been "at it" for two years now, but as you will also find, "you can't have just one". I'm up to four T's and an "A" now!
You will soon find this forum is chock full of a lot of great veteran T folk, always willing to share their vast knowledge. And occasionally the forum gets entertaining!

Welcome again
Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 09:54 am:

That "you pay the shipper" through various mysterious ways is the standard speal with these dirty tricks. Leave him alone and he'll usually go away. Unless he's like the guy I got involved with years ago. At that time I'd list name address and what ever else was required legitimitely. He found my phone # on the web and called a few times. I now alter everything except a legit e-mail address that's used only for sales and the location. They can find nothing with wrong info and you'll only be contacted by e-mail.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 09:59 am:

Years ago, someone told me that if you speak to 100 women a day on the street and ask each one of them, in the crudest possible terms, if they would be interested in spending a little time in bed with you, you would only need a 1% success rate to have a pretty active sex life. The same principle probably applies to sitting in a one-room apartment with an internet connection and sending a couple of thousand scam e-mails every day. If people weren't making money at it, they'd probably stop doing it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 10:16 am:

I'm sorry sir if you wish to continue this transaction I will require the full amount of the vehicle cost and shipping in gold, silver or platinum delivered to my front door, thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Chaffin on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 11:16 am:

Just posted on Craig's List and was contacted by Corey John also who stated he could only provide payment through PAYPAL and would arrange shipping. Message deleted.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 11:53 am:

My wife received the following email twice in the past few days. She does not have a B of A account...


From: "Bank of America Alert" <bankofamericatransfers@mail.transfers.bankofamerica.com>
Date: February 12, 2014 at 7:43:12 AM PST
To: xxxxxxxx@aol.com
Subject: Bank of America Alert: Message from Customer Service


Dear valued customer :
During our usual security enhancement protocol, we observed multiple login attempt error while login in to your online banking account. We have believed that someone other than you is trying to access your account for security reasons, we have temporarily suspend your account and your access to online banking and will be restricted if you fail to update.

confirm your update by clicking the following link here: > Confirm Your Update Here

Please Note:
If we do no receive the appropriate account verification within 48 hours, then we will assume this Bank account is fraudulent and will be suspended. The purpose of this verification is to ensure that your bank account has not been fraudulently used and to combat the fraud from our community.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 11:59 am:

The Canadian folks have been sending me notices that they owe me $681.00 tax return. Delete.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 12:10 pm:

Warnings about my account at banks where I don't have an account are easy. I do have an account at Bank of America, though, and some of the phishing mails I get purporting to come from BofA are very skilled. It's generally very small things that give them away.

When I get one, I just switch to "Show complete header," then forward it to abuse@bankofamerica.com. Once I have done that, I delete it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 12:17 pm:

The phishing emails using the graphics of real companies often look very good, but they're usually betrayed by their difficulty with English.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 12:29 pm:

You're right about that, Steve. The last part of the email I posted says, "...and to combat the fraud from our community". Not what I'd expect from B of A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 12:38 pm:

I Just found out I have a relative who wants my help getting about 12 million U.S. Dolars out of Nirobi And they are willing to pay me a small fee of 10%... All I have to do is supply them with my banks routing number Etc, Etc..... now where is that delete button?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 01:02 pm:

Steve, I agree. Sometimes the hint that it is non-native English is pretty subtle. Another frequent giveaway is when they tell you to click on the link below to correct your problem. The link can be labeled "http://bankofamerica.com/account_verification," but if you cursor over it and look at the bottom of the screen, you see that it is really a link to an address in Russia or Romania.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 01:43 pm:

Dick,
How can you tell that? When I put the cursor on the blue link all I see at the bottom of the screen is a repeat of the same address in black and white.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 02:00 pm:

Henry, if the address at the bottom of the screen is the same as the link, then the link really goes to where it says it does.

In this case:

www.mtfca,com

It looks like a link to the MTFCA home page, but it is really a link to a (non-existent) fake link in Russia called "gotcha", which you will see at the bottom of the page if you cursor over what looks like the mtfca.com link.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 02:31 pm:

Steve Jelf, you're wrong when you say, "Occasionally a sucker takes the bait".
There are many suckers taking the bait every day. Many!
That would all stop if the criminals were ever punished.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Katy, Texas on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 - 05:28 pm:

Received an email wanting me to click on a link to confirm my Yahoo account because the email said someone had tried to log in that was unauthorized. Yahoo said it wasn't true.


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