Pickron Electric Works Questions

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Pickron Electric Works Questions
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 01:30 pm:

Hello everyone again, you who know everything!
I got hold of this test equipment today, as the seller bought in the U.S. a few years ago.
I know nothing about this, but there are certainly some on the forum who knows?

Ake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 01:40 pm:

I missed writing;
On the meter it says;
A.C. VOLTAGE PICKRON ELEC `L WORKS

Ake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren W. Mortensen on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 10:48 pm:

What does the tag in the lower left corner say?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 11:12 pm:

Looks like something to jump start Dr Frankenstein's monster. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Friday, February 14, 2014 - 10:25 am:

Warren
... the tag says; Pickron ELECTRICAL WORKS
ROCK ISLAND ILL:
Here's a better picture. It has many cables.
To the right of these cables marked with C B A
4 pcs rotary switches.
Should be fun and knowing what it is for?

Top sees a steel rod that you can shoot at different distances.
Can this be used to test inductions?
Then adjust the distance.

According to the seller followed it with other car parts,
Ake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Friday, February 14, 2014 - 10:32 am:

A little more when pictures


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jamie Holmes on Friday, February 14, 2014 - 09:34 pm:

Don't know what is does but it appears to need a set of points


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 01:55 am:

It might be some kind of early radio, there is a mention of an H.H. Pickron patent in the following document. Once you have opened the document, search for "pickron":

http://www.americanradiohistory.com/Archive-Radio-News/20s/Radio-News-1924-Aug.p df


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 04:05 am:

Mark thanks for that, but there I found nothing, do not think there is any radio.
You wonder why there are so many cables with clamps.
I think they should sit on the lower wooden holder.

Ake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 04:28 am:

first pic. top right four holes, two small, two big
rectifier vacuum tube AO-1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kerry van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 04:45 am:

This is all I could find of the name in patents, described as 'Method and apparatus for testing combustion engines'


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 10:57 am:

I'm wondering if maybe the 4 pin socket is for a vibrator (DC - AC) as the meter is AC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 11:11 am:

What is under the face panel/inside what appears to be a box?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Saturday, February 15, 2014 - 01:41 pm:

I am amazed by the lack of information available on the web for mister Hugo H. Pickron and his company. He apparently didn't make much of a splash in Rock Island, Illinois, the town website makes no mention of him or his company.

Here is a link to a page containing the illustration that Kerry posted above, it gives a verbal description of the purpose and details of the combustion engine testing device. Note that the patent was applied for in 1949 and published in 1953.

http://www.google.com/patents/US2646683


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warren W. Mortensen on Monday, February 17, 2014 - 09:25 am:

Replacement power supply for a battery operated radio? A,B & C sound like the battery sizes used for the various circuits.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 02:40 am:

Thanks for that Warren
finally ... you've solved it.
But why so many cables?
Do you know what or how to search the internet to find this, Forum etc.

Ake


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 03:26 am:

Ake,

Before there was widespread electricity...the radios of course were battery powered. Then when electricity became more common, along came devices such as yours. Toss your batteries...go direct!

I'm not sure why yours has 3 sets of wires for each A/B/C. Yet I notice that there are unique colors also for each 3....pop the lid and look at how hooked together underneath. May be that there is enough for three radios...which sounds weird...

Someone here might be smarter than me and explain better...but 'A' should be low voltage and somewhere about 1.5 volts. It was used to as a filament heater in the radio. "B" was a higher voltage, much higher voltage, and it provided energy to the plate in the tube. You get 'A' and 'B' backwards and usually you had a 'poof' and all tubes failed.

The 'C' terminal provided a voltage that acted as the cruise control to keep it from cycling as it discharged...not sure of its official name but think 'plate bias control'?

I haven't played with tubed radios since the 50's...(other than to build a warbler controller for a Federal-Signal Fire Engine Siren in about 1970 just because there was this dusty box of tubes and so folks could laugh at me for doing so...but I'm sure that somewhere, somehow, there is some club that knows how you have actually works.

(My first radio was a crystal radio with a home made crystal...burning off the insulation from someone's scrap copper wire...winding it on a toilet paper tube and then making an antenna which seemed to be a mile of wire all crunched into a diamond non-overlapping frame made from 2 sticks! Prove to Dad I could do that...next learning experience was vacuum tubes and how to read resistors...lol. I pretty much gave up when along came widespread use of transistors and IC devices)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 11:11 am:

I highly doubt that Ake's device is a radio "battery eliminator."

A battery eliminator is a transformer and rectifier. A battery eliminator would not have all the extra gizmos in the Pickron apparatus shown above such as the points on the lower left, buzzer, the spark gap on the top middle, the gauge, etc.

Also, battery eliminators were typically enclosed/neatly packaged, not the Rube Goldberg shown.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wahrendorff on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 11:42 am:

In a radio power supply the A leads (there should be two) usually power the filament voltage which comes from a 6v storage battery. The B current can be anywhere from 45-125v dc depending on the set. They were usually supplied by dry cell batteries. C voltage is 4.5v dc dry cell and used for bias voltage. The four pin tube slot may be for an 80 rectifier tube or some special tube that the battery eliminator was made to run on . They came in various forms before 1927 or 1928 when radios were finally made to run on AC current instead of batteries.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ake Osterdahl on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 03:13 am:

Hey all
new photos ... what can the sliding iron bar used for?
And a picture of the inside if it can solve the mystery.
Ake


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