Old Photos, more Watkins man

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Old Photos, more Watkins man
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 12:13 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 12:14 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 12:14 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 12:15 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 01:47 am:

The guy in the third photo looks like Mr. Haney.

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 06:07 am:

I like the first photo, looks like a sliding
door, gotta build me one..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 09:23 am:

The 3rd and 5th pictures look like the Watkins Man that we had. When I first saw the 1st picture with the bottles on the running board, I thought I had really had a flash back, because we and others would trade chickens for Watkins Products, and he would truss them up and lay them out on the running board. They served a very useful purpose, we lived so far out in the country it took and extra day for daylight to get to us. We raised everything, and the Watkins Man brought my Grandmother (s) the vanilla, baking soda, salt and pepper, things they had to have to cook with, but we raised everything else, with a Sears-Roebuck catalog in the outhouse. One of my Grandmothers, who shall remain unnamed, would sometimes trade for a small can of snuff, she would also leave a nickel in the mailbox for the Post Man, he would bring her a can if she did, I always knew when it was due, she would tell me not to go get the mail, she would, and the secret stayed with her.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 11:14 am:

A bit of thread drift, but relevant.

Grady, I love your posts! I have been reading them with delight for years now, and I am never disappointed. You have a knack for relating aspects of life "back in the day" in a manner which is at once educational and entertaining. Your unique situation earlier in life is part of the Model T folklore which many of us would not otherwise have access to.

Thank you so much for your contributions to our Forum!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 11:19 am:

Sounds like the Grady Puryear Story would be a very worth wile read.

Sam, I hadn't noticed the slider. Very interesting feature.

Grady, I wonder what the Watkins man got for the chickens? It must have been worth it or he wouldn't have done it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 01:13 pm:

Mr. Walker and Mr. Bruckner, thank you for the Kudos. I stopped answering anything in the Forum for a while, seemed like no one really cared to read about old times and "back in the day", glad someone does.

Mr. Bruckner, the Watkins Man, and others who bartered, simply traded and bartered whatever they got in trade for something else, just a never ending parade of barter and trade. We traded with a store in Austin, a hard days ride there and back, to swap butter, eggs, and turkey poults.

The eggs were from my Grandmothers Narragansett turkeys, they were a cross between the wild and domestic turkeys, and were quite popular with folks out in the country. Part of my chores every day was to go looking for the turkeys we had, and bring them home. They could be anywhere within a five mile radius of home, I did a lot of walking.

I learned that if you beat on a tin bucket with a rock, just make a lot of racket, they would sometimes gobble back at you, saved a lot of walking. Bad news was the wild ones would gobble too, so you had to go and look and sort them out.

And as far as the Watkins Man trading chickens for Watkins products, he didn't really have any choice, it was that or nothing. I don't think people really realize how broke everyone was, but we were like the One Eyed Man in the Land of the Blind, we had a house, a garden, chickens, a hog, all of the necessities of life, so we were not that bad off.

And as for the Grady Puryear Story, I am working on just that very thing, have been for several years on and off, mostly off, and must try to put it to bed ere long or it will not get done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 02:41 pm:

Grady, One of the best things about these Ford Ts is the connection to the past. I have always thought of my car as part time machine. I must encourage you to the utmost to write all you can about your story. I enjoy reading these slices of life. Such a window into the world of yesteryear is priceless, rare, and holds a great interest to more than just me. Please put me down for an advance copy of "The Grady Puryear Story".

My grandmothers on both sides lived through moments I can only imagine and I have the life I have today because of the chances they took. I loved to hear them tell of those days but now they are gone. I would love for my kids to hear these stories if only they were written down, thus made safe from the sieve of my memory.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 02:44 pm:

"And as for the Grady Puryear Story, I am working on just that very thing..."

Grady -- That's great news. I will want a copy, and I'm sure several others here will as well.

It had to be a very different world to grow up in during the Great Depression. My folks, and aunts and uncles who were born in the 20's ("The Greatest Generation"), all grew up during that time, but not many of them wanted to talk about it much. If you can put it down on paper so the rest of us can try to understand it, that would be invaluable. Thank you for realizing its importance and acting on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tyler searle on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 03:17 pm:

Put me down for a couple of copies, Mr. Puryear. I think you would be surprised at how many would be interested in your story.
In the mean time, please do keep commenting here on the forum.
Thank you for all your contributions.

Tyler Searle


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 04:26 pm:

Oh man, I have a first hand knowledge of wild turkeys. They are fascinating. Any turkey, wild or half wild, can run faster than any one eyed kid. They can sure fly better than folks realize too. I would hate to have to be the de facto turkey wrangler. Funny what sounds will make them "shock gobble". Works best in the spring while they are feeling amorous.

I guess if you need salt, pepper, and that Watkins vanilla, you gotta do what you gotta do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 04:36 pm:

Great stories, Grady. Put me down for a copy, too!

Gil Fitzhugh the Elder


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 05:01 pm:

Also notice on the first truck are some added upper running board support rods that I have not seen before. This is a rather unique truck. Wonder what company did it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By daniel ryan on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 06:39 pm:

Grady, I read a book about LBJ early years,in the Texas {Hill country}. It was a good read.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 06:50 pm:



The alternative source?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim york on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 09:50 pm:

Hi Grady, Put me down for at least one copy. Jim York , and thanks for giving us a glimpse of the real past that some of our folks grew up in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Thursday, February 20, 2014 - 10:20 pm:

Hi Grady - Put me down for a copy also.

Thanks,

Keith


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