Running in oil for newly built motor

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Running in oil for newly built motor
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in South Africa on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 06:32 am:

Hi All,

A thought has been mulling around in my head for a while. Lots of space in there ... :-)

When my motor is rebuilt, everything will be to the correct tolerances as described by many of you, thank you...

Now, the motor will have an oil sieve under the transmission cover, complete with magnet, and the sump plug is also the magnetic type.

Would you recommend I use a certain grade of oil for say, the first 20 litres of fuel, and then drain and replace with what I should use from then on?

I'll clean the sieve and drain plug as well as I'm sure it will have stuff caught there...

I remember a well respected farm mechanic who used to rebuild Landcruiser motors. He would fill the sump with SAE 30 and take a slow cruise to his main gate, about 9 km away. Big farm...

Then, he would drain the SAE 30 and replace the oil filter, and refill with 20w50 if I recall correctly.

So, would it make sense to do something similar in the newly rebuilt t?

If so, what and when?

Thanks everyone,

Justin Elliott
South Africa


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 06:45 am:

Hello Justin,

I am doing about the same but I use the same oil (10w40 grade) for the run in as the oil I use during the year. The first drain is after the first drive for about 100 km with a few stops for coffee pie or ice cream to cool down.

Just enjoy

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in South Africa on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 07:03 am:

Thanks Andre!

Yes, I thought the same... SAE 30 is quite thick for these tight clearances and we don't get SAE 20 around here.. at least none that I have seen.

I was thinking a 15w40 mineral detergent oil like Motul for run in... then go 15w40 full synthetic after.. Mobil one or Royal Purple or similar...

What do you think?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Chantrell - Adelaide, Australia on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 07:09 am:

I use old fashioned Valvoline 100% pure mineral oil 10W-40. I would not a synthetic oil and make sure nothing with zinc or any other metal additives. Eventually the metal additives will penetrate the coil plate and render it useless.

I am sure others with far better engineering knowledge will chime in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in South Africa on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 07:27 am:

Hi David,

I remember you saying that... And I looked for the Valvoline agents in my area, and did find them..

That sounds like a plan. Not sure if I have the guts to go 10w, might just start at 15w...

Regards
Justin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 07:40 am:

The main thing is to use oil that is the appropriate rating for the temperature. If the temperature is anywhere from 0*C - 35*C then 5W-30 is a good choice for that sort of average temperature.

On the other hand if you live in the Sahara, and the average temperatures range from 20*C - 50*C then you could use something like 20W-50.

Remember I am making this recommendation for a Model T Ford. The engine relies on splash and drip to lubricate. If the oil is too thick it doesn't lubricate. There's no pump to force it in between the bearing surfaces.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Wicker on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 03:26 pm:

Every time I change oil in a T I clean the strainer in the transmission.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 08:52 pm:

I have tried using several different types of oil in different engines and finally a few years ago settled on the "KISS" rule: Keep it simple, stupid. I now use Pennzoil 10w-30 year-round in every engine I have : My wife's RAV-4, my BMW M-3, my '86 Chevy work truck, my Model T's, my excavator, lawn mowers, and power washer. It's a great lubricant which works fine in all the above, and I don't see any reason to make matters more difficult.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome Hoffman, Hays KS on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 11:14 pm:

I use val 20-50 in my touring. The engine is in need of a complete redo, new everything. The shimns all the rods are gone, and only the rear main has any left.

I'm working on a new engine for a speedster.

Here is what I plan to do to break it in. Every component will be put together with assumably lube. I'll use 20 w 20 for run in on the test stand, and using my infred laser thermometer will keep a close eye on temps and once it will stay running without over heating it will be time for its first oil change. 2nd one will still be 20w20 and I'll change #3 after it's next hour to 10w30. I plan to use 10w30 for the next 1000 miles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome Hoffman, Hays KS on Friday, February 21, 2014 - 11:20 pm:

Then the plan is to go to 15w30, followed with 30 w in the summer going back to 15w30 in the winter. Once I have it working like I want it too, I'll peraty much stay with straight 30 till I start needing to take shims out and feel its now on the loose side going to 40 w. That I hope won't be for at least 10 years nor 10/15K mikes.

Posted from my pad and not able to edit as well as my normal computer. Jerry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, February 22, 2014 - 03:12 am:

First run-in break-in oil? Something thin and cheap! (And no metallic additives)
Have fun and good luck!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Saturday, February 22, 2014 - 07:38 am:

Wayne is on the money, for over forty years I have used straight thirty weight non detergent oil for all engine break in's with no problems. On T engines run about two hundred miles, then put in whatever is your preferred flavor. On modern engines I run about five hundred miles before changing but most folks change oil in their T's about every five hundred anyway. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Saturday, February 22, 2014 - 09:32 am:

I wouldn't use 20W-50 on a new engine, neither would I use a real light weight oil. Other than that, I don't think it makes any difference. 15W-40 seems to work best in my cars. I buy jugs of it at Walmart.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom on Sunday, February 23, 2014 - 07:33 pm:

Wayne and Keith are correct. Non detergent either 20 or 30. You want to promote wear at the rings sooner than later. To this day when changing an aircraft cylinder non detergent oil is used until consumption stabilizes. Usually 25 hours. This would be 400 miles or so in a T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in South Africa on Monday, February 24, 2014 - 12:06 pm:

Thanks guys,

I appreciate the input.

Justin


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