Piquette production

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Piquette production
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By stuart clipson on Saturday, February 22, 2014 - 03:35 pm:

does anyone know when the last ford t was produced at the piquette plant? the last owner of my car said it was made at the piquette plant, but i am quite suspicious. the production or shipping documents do not say what plant and from what i have read here and there is not conclusive. my car has a build date of 27 feb, '11.

thanks

stu


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Saturday, February 22, 2014 - 04:13 pm:

Stuart,
I'm sure someone with more background will be able to give a more specific date, but this article implies most Piquette activities have been completed by late October 1910:



And this account indicates activities have ended some months ago as of September 30 1911:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By stuart clipson on Saturday, February 22, 2014 - 07:53 pm:

thanks rob

i've seen the articles previously and was not able to reach any solid conclusions. i wonder if any of the names on the mfg and shipping docs could be traced to one plant or the other as they signed off on the various steps in mfg. anyone had any experience doing this?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Sunday, February 23, 2014 - 06:50 pm:

Hi,

In my research on the Piquette Avenue Plant, I found that final assembly appears to have been shifted to the new Highland Park Plant about the first of January 1910. However, component manufacturing continued for the next 1-1/2 years at Piquette while construction at Highland Park continued. One of the last assembly operations to move to HP was the magneto coil sheet. This department employed mostly women because the delicate shape of their fingers made wrapping the cotton tape around the individual coils easier. According to James Purdie, it was one of Edward "Spider" Huff's favorite places to hang out.

The company offices moved to Highland Park in January 1911, and in the June 1911 FMC Director's Meeting Minutes a motion was approved to sell the plant for the best price available. Studebaker bought the property, and later on added the Albert Kann style building. The bridge between the old Piquette building and the new building was added at that time. Also added was another enclosed bridge between the new building and the Studebaker building across John R street from Piquette.

The old Studebaker complex burned to the ground in June 2005. That was a long night for me as my 1907 Model in was on display in Piquette at the time. I was in Montana, watching the Internet for news that the fire had spread to Piquette. Fortunately, the Detroit Fire Department was able to successfully protect Piquette from the fire raging across the street. It was a tense night.

Respectfully Submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Sunday, February 23, 2014 - 11:44 pm:

Trent,

Even more important than the Detroit Fire Department were the actions of Piquette Plant volunteers Dale McDermott, Dick Rubens and Paul Sloan in running around the roof of the plant extinguishing any sparks that landed. What also helped was the Albert Kahn addition you mention blocked a lot of the heat from the fire.


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