Transmission Chatter: Why?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Transmission Chatter: Why?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Taylor on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 - 06:48 pm:

I was wondering, what causes the transmission to chatter? My 1926 Fordor does just before shifting into second but goes away after I shift into Second gear. But it happens mostly when I go in reverse. Is this normal?

Thanks,


Peter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Michael Rogers on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 - 07:06 pm:

Sounds like some play in the triple gear bushings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 03:45 am:

Peter, what kind of bands are you using? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 04:02 am:

Are you letting up on the throttle and letting all the way out on the pedal when you shift? Just askin'


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 07:41 am:

Too much throttle and too slow pedal movement. You should engage low or reverse with fairly rapid pedal movement with as little throttle as possible, near idle speed. With practice you will not have any chatter once you master the proper driving technique.

New T drivers often rev the engine way up in anticipation of pushing on the pedal, then gingerly apply the pedal. This causes rapid band wear and failure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Taylor on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 07:56 am:

David, I'm using Kevlar bands. Keith, yes, but I think Royce probably has the correct idea. I am a newbie, and have no previous experience with Model Ts. The only way I know how to drive them is from what I have read. I'll try these new techniques this summer, when I get her up and running again.

Thanks,


Peter


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 12:12 pm:

You need the right kind of oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 12:16 pm:

Royce is dead-on
If you cannot get your car into low or reverse at an idle, on flat pavement, then something's wrong. Generally it will be because the engine's too far advanced and the combination of sudden engagement of bands combined with BTDC sparking results in very low torque available. If the band is properly adjusted and ignition somewhat retarded, then the mass of the transmission/flywheel will easily overcome static friction in the drive system.

Remember...you're trying to stop a spinning drum, to engage the planetary system. Is it easier and require less effort to stop a fast spinning drum or a slow spinning drum?

I'm always amazed when I go to tours, how many folks really don't know how the car was designed to be operated, and in the course of the tour really punish their vehicles needlessly. I've also found that if they've driven or owned their car for more than a year, they will likely never take this advice, much less appreciate hearing it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - 01:24 pm:

Scott,

"... if they've driven or owned their car for more than a year, they will likely never take this advice, much less appreciate hearing it."

How very true!


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration