Ford announces all cars will be Brewster Green

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Ford announces all cars will be Brewster Green
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Friday, February 28, 2014 - 11:06 pm:

June 1909 article says all Ford Model T cars will be Brewster green as soon as red and gray body supply is exhausted:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Saturday, March 01, 2014 - 07:59 am:

I've only seen one green model t and loved it, very dark nearly black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Saturday, March 01, 2014 - 09:15 am:

Ford used Brewster green for other models prior to the T. I've seen Model T with dark (almost black) green color and I think it's a great color too. Looking at the MTFCA encyclopedia, June is listed (by the late Bruce McCalley) as the month of the change to Brewster green.

http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1909.htm



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 02:13 pm:

Anyone have a current paint brand or mfg. formula for the 1910 'Brewster Green'?

MTFCA says Brewster Green is DDL #1017 or DAR #44328, but DuPont paint dealer says codes are obsolete and can't ref. any current enamel paint.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 02:18 pm:

Maybe a body shop that's been in business long enough would have a cross reference to give a modern number.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 02:39 pm:

Steve

Tried Du Pont's webpage of historical auto paints but it only goes to 1930. :-)

Hope someone has a current formula, non Du Pont, just something is that documented to be close to the dark green used. Have found good ref for the Dark Blue, on past forum posts, but nothing for the Brewster Green.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 04:10 pm:

Here is a website with Ditzler codes for Model A Ford Brewster Green, I don't know if the Model T color was the same or not.

http://paintref.com/cgi-bin/colorcodedisplay.cgi?type=sample&ditzler=IM1017&syea r=1931&smanuf=Ford&smodel&sname=Brewster+Green&name=ford1931IM1017


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 04:19 pm:

MAC's sells a paint they call Brewster Green, be sure to read their disclaimer on the page (along with their warning that paint is not returnable, whether opened or not).

http://macsautoparts.com/model-t-ford-body-paint-acrylic-lacquer-brewster-green- quart-august-1909-10-touring-roadster-town-car-rspd1017q/camid/MDT/cp/JS0R3CHL10 69581/

Does anyone have a car painted with MAC's paint that they can post a picture of here?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 04:22 pm:

I didn't look at the price before I posted the link above, $175.00 a quart? Holy smokes!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Allen on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 04:34 pm:

I have good luck reproducing Model T colors with these guys:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qqnp-JBko0Y

AutoColorLibrary.com

They go clear back to early carriages in the 1800's.

Jon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 04:45 pm:

There would seem to be a need for some kind of reference system for our paint colours due to the superseding of various formulae from the different companies. There exists such a system already which is used as a reference in all sorts of applications, called Pantone colours.

When looking for a period green to paint my 1917 shooting brake, I found the colour I wanted, used to paint the premises of a liquor chain. I phoned the corporate offices and asked for the Pantone number for the paint they used. I am sure the lady thought it was a prank call. I had to repeat the request later, before they got the idea. The resulting number, given to the paint supplier, resulted in exactly what I wanted.

To make this work, two things are required. You need a physical sample of the colour you want, be it on a building, car, or whatever. Getting agreement on just what Brewster Green is used as this sample may be the hardest. Then you need a set of Pantone colour swatches to get a match to that colour. This will give a Pantone number for that colour, and any good paint shop should be able to produce that for you.

I have difficulty pinning down colours from the paint chips used by paint suppliers. They are too small for me to get an accurate picture. However, if I can see a large area, say on another vehicle of any vintage, or a building, I find it much more satisfactory.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jon Allen on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 05:10 pm:

Allan,
Matching color is very difficult because of a whole bunch of physics that I don't understand. The guys at AutoColor Library that I referenced above are pretty good.
What I did on a '26 Touring to get "Commercial Green" was to have autocolorlibrary send me a paint chip (4" x 6" on a cardboard chip). I then had my painter scan the color on the chip and match that in modern acrylic paint. I was pleased with the result that came out nice.

Here is a picture of the car when finished:



The reality is that today's paint chemistry is so far superior to the original paints that there isn't any argument about it. IMHO getting an original color from a place like autocolorlibrary and reproducing it in modern paint is the best way to go.

Jon


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 07:59 pm:

Jon, I am sure that is the route taken by the paint shop to mix my colour too. The hard part is getting the sample. You had a colour to match, your commercial green, and had a sample made of that. This is where the Pantone number comes in.If you match a Pantone swatch to the colour you want duplicated, give the paintshop that number, they can mix it to that.

There is another standardised set of colours for describing soil colours called Munsel soil colours.They are used the same way. The soil sample you have is matched to a colour chip and then a reference number is available to anyone who wishes to use/study from there.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 07:56 am:

Brewster Green appears black unless you are in bright sunlight. This car appears the right color on my computer screen. It is Brian Ostergren's car.


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