OT - 1915, Fords, Packards and Rotarians, what do they have in common?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT - 1915, Fords, Packards and Rotarians, what do they have in common?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 11:08 am:

No, not the start of a bad joke......

This article appeared in a PA newspaper in 1915. The "six-cylinder Ford" tenure has long ended (1908). Before I start "preaching" I'm off to Church, so I'll let anyone else comment about the article. I think it's an interesting find:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Sunday, March 02, 2014 - 06:55 pm:

OK, i was rushing around this morning, now i have a little time:

When I stumbled upon this article, I was surprised. Seven years after the manufacture of the Model K, this article mentions the six cylinder Ford in passing along with a Packard, telling fellow Rotarians to get into either their Ford six or Packard and leave work early (and put your roll top desk down) to meet socially.

I believe Rotary members of this period were probably mostly or all white collar, and the mention of Packard suggests to me the "six cyl. Ford" reference wasn't a "dig" at an old car. The article also also doesn't say "get into Tom's, or Fred's Ford or Packard" (meaning there weren't two specific cars belonging to two appointed drivers picking other members up).

I've looked at this critically and really can't find any "hidden meaning" other than to suggest the "six cyl. Ford was still well known and used in Harrisburg PA area.

Maybe that's why we see so many of them around Hershey each year. :-)

Anyway, a surprising article.

Rob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, March 03, 2014 - 02:14 am:

I think it is a neat piece! I love the reference to "pull down the (roll-top) desk lids". To me, it gives such an era "color" to it.
The Ford model K saga continues!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, March 03, 2014 - 07:12 am:

Probably someone in town had one. It would have been notable because there could be no question who they were talking about. Probably only one Packard in town too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Monday, March 03, 2014 - 08:58 am:

Wayne,
Yes, it gives a reference to time. Today it may have said "put away your tablet", or "log off" and go.

Royce,
We often misunderstand each other, so let me get this correct. You're saying there was probably only one six cylinder Ford and one Packard in town, so they used those two brands? It does generally say "get into your six-cyl. Ford or Packard", not "get into Bob's Ford or Larry's Packard."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Monday, March 03, 2014 - 09:26 am:

I like the "pull down the desk lids" comment too. It seems to allude to the idea that all Rotarians would of course have roll-top desks rather than a less costly, plainer one. And I gather that the article is saying that all Rotarians would of course have a nice car, such as a Packard or a six-cylinder Ford. We don't know that that was the writer's intent of course, but that's the meaning I get from it.

And I find it interesting that the article doesn't say to "bring your Packard or your Buick," or to "bring your Packard or your Pierce." Perhaps Packards and 6-cyl. Fords were nice enough for Rotarians, but without being over the top.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Monday, March 03, 2014 - 05:14 pm:

Wrong thread but still the same,i like the term [Let Her Out.] PS,Ordered book!! Bud in Wheeler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, March 03, 2014 - 07:39 pm:

Maybe you had to be a Rotarian to be able to purchase a Model K? That would certainly explain why only 900 something were ever sold.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Monday, March 03, 2014 - 09:22 pm:

I believe there are now over a million Rotarians worldwide. I was a Rotarian back in a previous life. We donated a lot of money to causes around the world.

If that is an attempt at humor, I'd put a smiley face with it, but that's just me....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Nebraska on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 08:33 am:

Reference the post above:

"Probably someone in town had one. It would have been notable because there could be no question who they were talking about. Probably only one Packard in town too."

A little background about the Harrisburg PA area. Being the capitol of PA, Harrisburg had an active Ford dealership, with numerous Model NRS and K sales showing up in the Harrisburg newspapers between 1906 and 1909. George Allison, recognized as the first man to buy a U.S. commercially built car (Winton) bought a Model K Ford in 1908, and the news articles appeared throughout the U.S. when he chose a Ford. Mr. Allison lived in a small town about 60 miles from Harrisburg, and this articles appeared in one of the Harrisburg papers:





Additionally, Philadelphia is located just over 100 miles from Harrisburg, and was the home of a Ford Branch site, so it's quite likely many if not most motorists still remembered the Ford six cylinder car as of 1915.

Packard also had a significant presence, having a branch store in Harrisburg during this time:



As a result, in my opinion, most readers would certainly have known of the Packard "brand", and by association, I believe they must have still have known of the "six cylinder Ford" in the area.

An interesting story demonstrating the "staying power" of the car, at least in some areas of the country.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 01:10 pm:

Royce:

Last week, in response to one of Rob's posts regarding the number of early Pierce cars which have survived...wherein Rob referenced a 1980 book on the subject you posted: "Rob bases his number of surviving Pierce automobiles on a book printed in 1980. It is tedious to say the least Rob."

Above in this thread you posted: "Maybe you had to be a Rotarian to be able to purchase a Model K? That would certainly explain why only 900 something were ever sold."

For the record, the number of times that Rob has mentioned the 1980 book on this forum is only a tiny fraction of the number of times you have mentioned on this forum the fact that only 900 or so Model K's were sold.

In my humble opinion, you suggesting that Rob's posts are tedious is a bit like the pot calling the kettle black. But this is just my opinion, and I am sure that many will disagree.

Timothy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 07:17 pm:

Timothy,

I was attempting to be funny. Obviously it almost went right over your head. Next time duck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Timothy Kelly on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 12:57 am:

Royce:

Whew...I feel better now. Thanks for enlightening me!

I thought your comment chastising Rob for being tedious was intended as criticism. But now that you point it out, I can see clearly that it's not critical....it's hysterical.

Timothy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Holcomb, Watertown WI on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 06:55 am:

We need an emoticon for sarcasm!


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