OT - English sizes?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT - English sizes?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 01:08 pm:


These were in a recent pile of auction plunder. Two of the same wrench, so you see both sides. The big end measures about 13/16" (21mm). On one side of the wrench that's labeled 1/2 BSF. On the other side the same thing is labeled 7/16 W.

At the small end the size is 23/32" (18mm). That's labeled 7/16 BSF and 3/8 W. What are the units of measurement here?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 01:19 pm:

The W is Whitworth. When I was living in Holland and owned the Austin, I was in London one day for my work. High on my list was to go to a hardware store and buy a set of Whitworth wrenches so I could work on the car more easily. (Our British forum participants would probably say that I went to the ironmonger's to buy a set of spanners, but we know better.... :-) )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 01:21 pm:

More...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Standard_Whitworth


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 01:29 pm:

These are the old British thread sizes that were used before the 'Unified' sizes adopted after WWII (UNF and UNC). Some British cars (and especially bikes) continued to use these threads right up to the 1960s.
Unlike the Unified series, which has spanners marked with their 'Across Flats' dimension, the 1/2 BSF spanner fits the head of a 1/2" diameter British Standard Fine bolt or nut.
BSW is British Standard Whitworth - the coarse thread. The spanners here are confusing because the heads of BSW bolts and nuts used to be one size larger than their BSF equivalent. So your 1/2 BSF spanner would also fit a 7/16 BSW bolt head! Many spanners (like yours) were marked with both the BSF and BSW heads that they fit.
Later BSW bolt heads were the same as their BSF equivalent.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 02:37 pm:

Don't you just love standards! There are so many to choose from!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 08:09 pm:

Standard, go look at the brass pipe fittings in a hardware store some time. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 08:37 pm:

My brother has a 35 Rolls. Maybe he can use them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 09:19 pm:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/411578.html

I've heard the British had a lot of problem with the quality of their tanks in WWII. Maybe why.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 11:36 pm:

Steve,
Probably! Back when I worked in a RR & Bentley restoration shop (that I later turned into a T shop, just before it closed!) we used lots of those!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 12:34 am:

From the markings on the wrench I would guess they came with a Lister Diesel, maybe a power plant.
Another oddity was the 55 thread pitch used on Whitworth instead of the 60 common on this side of the pond.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 02:16 am:

Makes a good case for the tool us old folks call a Crescent Wrench, right? (Nowadays called an "adjustable wrench".)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 04:18 am:

Please don't criticise BSW threads and their 55 degree angle. I'm helping restore an old rope works, built around 1890 and abandoned in 1968. The building has a (leaky) roof, but no sides. We took 11 pulleys off the main line-shaft for sand-blasting. Each pulley has 4 large BSW bolts and 10 or 12 smaller (3/8) countersunk slotted-head screws and nuts. We only had to cut 3 small nuts (didn't damage their screws). The rest came undone with spanners and a screwdriver after 120 years!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 04:41 am:

Harold.

You need a minimum of 3 crescent wrenches
One for English - one for metric and the last for whitworth bolts


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 07:35 am:

British aircraft continue to use WS wrenches and bolt sizes. Not only are the bolts and wrench sizes odd, the hydraulic and oxygen plumbing is also unique and fraught with oddness. Coin slot screw heads and other hardware invented for the Lancaster Bomber and Hawker Hurricane fighter interceptor are probably coming from WWII era parts sources.

Hawker Beechcraft is in bankruptcy right now, so it could be near the end of the line for a lot of oddball hardware and plumbing fittings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 08:28 am:

Fred, 3 will not crack the mustard. You have forgotten those needed for left hand threads. And then there are the different ones for left handed mechanics, like left handed scissors. If you are not very careful you could be hit with a lawsuit for discrimination against those with sinister tendencies.

Allan from down under


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 10:10 am:

I bought a pair of left handed scissors once to cut brass, sometimes I needed to cut from a specific side of the work, and the left handed scissors worked great, but they became mixed up in my wife's stuff, and she grumbles every time she grabs them, I have left them there because I no longer work with brass, and it is fun to watch her try to use them.
Do not forget the need for a Crescent hammer in every tool box


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Schrope - Upland, IN on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 03:27 pm:

.......or as I was taught in a Ford tractor school in the mid 70's.......BFH or big swinging press!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Micheal Crowe on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 04:23 pm:

Hawker Beechcraft is out bankruptcy and has been sold.


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