Anybody know who paints tags

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Anybody know who paints tags
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Micheal Crowe on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 09:11 pm:

We are looking for someone who can repaint a tag for us.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 09:46 pm:

Not cheap, but the work looks good:

http://www.finishyourplates.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 10:08 pm:

Gerald Thiele in Texas
940-357-0387


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 10:18 pm:

If I remember correctly, Gerald told me at Chickasha that he was retiring from plate restoration. It wouldn't hurt to call and ask, though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Severn - SE Texas on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 - 11:29 pm:

Michael,

Gerald did this for me about four years ago.

Bill


Texas tag


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Katy, Texas on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 01:00 am:

I called and got Gerald's wife last summer and she said he had retired from the business because of age and health,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 01:16 am:

I don't know how daring you are but I restored a plate that was badly rusted. Rust can be removed by several methods, vinegar/lemon juice solution, electrolysis or oven cleaner/lye. Paint the back ground firstly. I painted the raised numbers and outline using a rubber printing roller by covering it with paint and passing it over the plate with one pass. The plate has to be secured firm and flat. This method worked well for me I think I was a bit lucky though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Floyd Voie - Chehalis, Washington on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 02:40 am:

The tool David used is called a brayer.

David, the brayer I have isn't quite wide enough to do a plate in one pass and didn't work too well having to make two passes. Some day mayby I'll find a larger brayer and see if I can get as lucky as you!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 10:06 am:

Here's the process. I've retired and no longer work at the sign factory, so I'm not set up to do it anymore.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jb8IvCaGdc


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 11:23 am:

Duane Wells. Lansing, MI 517-371-3225. Great work. Model T guy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 11:44 am:

Another nice video Steve...many thanks.

Boy, that is a lot of work - no wonder the cost of restoring by professionals is so high!

What's a "back yard guy" to do without all that equipment? Send it out, I guess.

Questions though - I did not get the name of the metal prep solution you used AFTER the rust remover - you said it was something to prevent further rust, I believe.

Also - the cooking process - what do you use - an oven in the shop? Also - how long and how hot?

Thanks,

dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 12:10 pm:

The metal prep I use is DuPont 5717S. I get it at O'Reilly's. In the sign factory there's a big walk-in oven where we cooked the signs overnight at 180, and I used that for cooking plates and car parts. I find that a home kitchen oven at its lowest setting works OK for small items. Without access to the big oven, I have to just let large items sit to dry for a long time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 12:23 pm:

Thank you !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Rhoads on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 12:58 pm:

Ive restored two sets of license plates using a method Im surprised nobody has mentioned here. Its easy, and requires no special equipment.

Step 1 Fix all the holes, dings, pits, etc., and get the surface primed and ready for paint.

Step 2 Give the plates several heavy coats of the color of the lettering. Ive been successful matching the original colors with spray cans available from a good auto parts store. Let the paint dry thoroughly before going to the next step.

Step 3 Give the plates a very light coat of the background color just enough to provide adequate coverage of the non-raised areas of the plates. Let this coat dry completely.

Step 4 With rubbing compound and plenty of water, use the end of your finger to rub through the thin background color coat to expose the lettering color underneath. Be careful not to rub through the bottom layer of paint. Youll be surprised what a nice, clean edge you can achieve between the two colors.

Step 5 Wash off all traces of rubbing compound. When thoroughly dry, spray the plates with a nice, glossy clear coat.

It takes a bit of time and patience and you might feel like youve worn a few thousandths off the end of your finger but it works. And if youre not satisfied with the results, you can always try again, or invest in a professional job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Fusi on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 01:43 pm:

I was short for time; work and family just seems to keep getting in the way. I sent my plates out to:
Vintage License Plate Restoration
1705 Sheffield Place
Fort Worth, Tx 76112
817 457 0103
817 727 9185 cell

Quick turn around, exceptional work.

Only grief was dealing with the DMV


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 02:51 pm:

Not the best pic but these were total rust. Close enough rattle can blue and letters die cut from contact like plastic stick on sheet. Looks so good up close it'd fool any one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Katy, Texas on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 05:44 pm:

I used the same guy in Fort Worth that Dave Fusi, did. Satisfied with results considering what I sent him to restore.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 09:35 am:

Thanks Steve ! Loved the video and added it to my 'Favorites' for later viewing again when I get down to restoring 3 different Texas plates of the 20s and teens. Guess I'll use a 50/50 of Ospho and water for rust and I especially appreciated the perseverance you displayed in the ding removal phase - and the tools fashioned. . .
Also glad to get the 800 grit answer and your definition of "cooked".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 09:53 am:

Floyd: I didn't use a brayer because I didn't have one so I used a roller off my 100 year old platen printing press. By holding the axle you can apply even pressure through the pass. A press roller is very soft and will apply an even distribution of paint, not every body has one of these. I don't think a brayer would do as good a job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Floyd Voie - Chehalis, Washington on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 12:28 pm:

David, thanks for the clarification. The brayer is pretty hard material and I didn't get that good of a job from it ...that's why I thought there was a bit of luck involved....but now I really believe it was your skill with the press roller!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Grady L Puryear on Friday, March 07, 2014 - 10:08 am:

I'll tell you one thing, after watching Mr. Jeff's video, he could get all the business he wanted !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould on Friday, March 07, 2014 - 10:33 am:

That sounds like a good way to do it, Jeff. Thanks for sharing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Friday, March 07, 2014 - 10:52 am:

WARNING, WARNING, WARNING !!!!!

I would never have a license plate collector paint a plate for me again if I didn't know someone that had one of his plates on his car. I traded some antique plates to one of the most active plate collector in the Colorado. I see him at ever swap meet with his hundreds and hundreds of plates. I traded him some plates for his painting a couple of plates for me. When I got the plates I installed them on one of my Ts and they DID NOT LAST THREE WEEKS AND THE PAINT WAS GONE. I think he must have used 5th grade student water colors.

Maybe what ever paint they use might be OK for hanging on the wall but are no good for installing on a car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Friday, March 07, 2014 - 10:52 am:

WARNING, WARNING, WARNING !!!!!

I would never have a license plate collector paint a plate for me again if I didn't know someone that had one of his plates on his car. I traded some antique plates to one of the most active plate collector in the Colorado. I see him at ever swap meet with his hundreds and hundreds of plates. I traded him some plates for his painting a couple of plates for me. When I got the plates I installed them on one of my Ts and they DID NOT LAST THREE WEEKS AND THE PAINT WAS GONE. I think he must have used 5th grade student water colors.

Maybe what ever paint they use might be OK for hanging on the wall but are no good for installing on a car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve McClelland on Friday, March 07, 2014 - 10:52 pm:

I painted this one by hand....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve McClelland on Friday, March 07, 2014 - 11:00 pm:

Forgot to list process....
I cleaned the tag with a wire brush, pecked out some tiny dents, primed, painted black with Jim Patrick's appliance black, used a yellow paint pen from Hobby Lobby or Walmart ?
Finished off with Clear....
Not a big deal and For sure not $95.00 worth!
Also have my 31 Deluxe Roadster registered with this plate.


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