Mounting new tires

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Mounting new tires
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cary Abate on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 08:53 am:

Please help. What is the correct way to mount new 450/21 tires on new T wires with metal stems?

Cary


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 09:43 am:

You're likely to get varying suggestions on the right method, but I think everybody will agree they go on easiest when they're warm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 09:48 am:

Those are the easiest tires to mount.
Like Steve said, lay them in the sun and get them hot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cary Abate on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 10:04 am:

I am assuming that the metal stem is mounted 1st and the tire goes over the rim and the tube fitted inside the tire. I know it sounds elementary but it is the processes I need.

Thanks
Cary


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 10:56 am:

Which type of rims do you have? The drop center wire spoke rim is completely different from the split rim which fits a wooden spoke wheel. the valve goes through the rim first with either type.

If you answer the question first, it would be less confusing to give an answer.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Syverson on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 11:13 am:

It sounds like you may be thinking the tube, with its metal stem, should be mounted to the rim first,and then the tire fitted over the tube and rim. No. The metal stemmed tube should be stuffed into the tire first, and then the tire/tube assy mounted on to the rim.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 12:00 pm:

Norman - he posted "new t wires" in his question.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Micheal Crowe on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 12:58 pm:

Wrap your tire irons with grey tape before you start.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 01:19 pm:

And just a bit of air in the tube to help prevent pinches. Not a lot. Just enough to help it keep it's shape. The taped irons is a good idea too depending on your rim's condition.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 05:14 pm:

Give up trying to do the job yourself. Take them down to your local tyre shop. Modern tyre fitters will accommodate 21" wheels. They will mount your rim on the machine with no damage to the paint. The tyre goes on next, often without any effort other than that supplied by the fitter. No levering at all. Then the tube is inserted and lightly aired. When the machine is lowered to fit the second side of the tyre, it is set just above the rim, and as the wheel is turned, the tyre slides into place with never the chance for the paintwork to be damaged. Your powdercoat is left in perfect order.

I have found this well worth the small charge made for the job.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 08:37 pm:

if i had to pay for all the tires i have mounted i'd be broke (or broker?). 21's done correctly will almost go on by hand, especially new ones. dust the tube with talcum powder, that keeps the rubber from sticking to the tire, years down the road you'll be glad you did it. years ago new tubes had a good coat of it but now like all else in the modern world they skip that part. baby powder works too. next, as mentioned above air it up just short of taking shape, just not flat like when you opened the package. she'll slide right in place with th powder on. next, flaps. you got flaps? i know, they are expencive, but really a good thing. they hold it all together and protect the tube from both the rim and your tire iron if needed. next, the big truck shops use a vegtable oil based rim coating, thin, smear it on with your finger. this helps the tire to slide over the rim, and also helps the bead to center itself on the rim, and is an aid to prevent rust, and will make the tire come apart easy some day when you want it off. you can buy a similar product called "rim-no-rust"at the auto store, but most truck stops will give you a dixe cup full. smear it on the side, where the bead sits against the rim, and also on the bottom edge that has to slip over the rim. stand the tire up after tube and flap are in, with the valve stem on the bottom sticking up. grab your new rim and set it down in to the valve stem with only one side of the bead in place on the rim, the other side will be inside the tire. now with the bead down in the drop center part of the rim you can just work it around with your hands. usually with the lube on you need no tire iron at least for side 1. next start working the other side in place always keeping the side thats in the rim down into the low center of the rim. work it around till done and you may not even need the iron again. air it up once, then let all the air out to help the tube get relaxed in place, put the valve stem in and air it up again for good. watch the bead move out on the rim and make sure it slides out all the way so as not out of round. then, be happy and go driving. new tires are so nice!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 08:42 pm:

sorry, forgot to mention to make sure the valve stem is standing up nice and straight, center of the hole before filling with air. rim lube here helps again as you can slide the tire around to get the tube in place


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Richard Bennett on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 09:48 pm:

Clayton, you have the process down to fine T. However, you would not be so broke if you stopped spending good money on flaps for drop centre rims. These are the T equivalent of all the rims used since the early thirties, both tubed and then tubeless. Flaps were never used in 30's, 40's, and later tyres. The tyre went on, one side first, the tube inserted, and then the second side levered in place. On a T wire wheel, some do prefer a thin rim liner to protect the tube from rough spots on the welded spoke ends.

Flaps are a must in split rims like the 21" wooden wheels. They protect the tube from chafing at the join and from the ingress of grit at the join. The guys at the truckstops know this. The lockring type tyres used prior to tubeless tyres all had flaps. These were installed as an assembled unit, the tyre with tube and flap inserted, was dropped over the rim, just as we do with collapsed T split rims. Then the lockrings were fitted to hold them in place. Again, the flaps kept the tube isolated from any grit getting in around the lockrings and the oversized valve stem holes in truck rims.

May this contribute to your future financial health in some small way.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 10:38 pm:

all very true allan, i never used to use flaps on drop center rims, but i do now when using new tires. i like how they hold every thing together and protect the tube while assembling everything. longer life for the tube? maybe. i know most of the antique tire suppliers will recommend flaps, but perhaps thats just to get more of my money!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Wednesday, March 05, 2014 - 10:47 pm:

one more tip, when dealing with new paint or powder coat, mount from the back side. you most likely will get the first bead on with no tools, and the last bead is a little tougher,so any scratches from a tire iron will be on the back side. hope this helps, really, tires are not a big deal to mount


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Cary Abate on Thursday, March 06, 2014 - 02:05 am:

Thanks to all,

I feel better now sending these to the tire shop. It is still too cold to let them set out for easiest installation by me. Besides, at my age it is not easy for a newbie.

Thanks all

Cary A


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