OT: doea liquid solder work as well as hot solder?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT: doea liquid solder work as well as hot solder?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 - 08:36 pm:

I need to solder my RC helicopter circuit board but the board is SO tiny I do not feel comfortable with an electrical solder iron. Besides, soldering is not my strong point. A train forum thread said liquid solder has high resistance. Any suggestions? Thank you! Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 - 09:12 pm:

I am no expert but I think liquid solder is not a solder it is a glue/epoxy type material. It has very little to no electricAL transfer. You need to solder it. Go to Radio Shack. They may know someone in your area to do it for you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 - 09:37 pm:

Robert

I used to solder for a living - its not that hard.

Couple suggestions:

1. both items your soldering must be immaculately clean! If its copper wire or traces on a pc board they must be bright and shiny

2. Use ONLY rosin core solder made for electronic work - nothing else!

3. For a newbie, it helps to "tin" or put a light coating of solder on each piece before you solder them together.

4. Most important - use enough heat so the solder "flows" on. Don't "dab" it on or "puddle" it on.

5. Practice soldering a few wires together first. When you have it right the solder joints will look slick and smooth.

Good luck - you can do it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 - 10:24 pm:

Hi Robert

First buy a smaller soldering iron . . .

This set is listed by “The Source” (Canadian Radio Shack) and
does not seem to be available from the US Radio Shack stores.
http://www.thesource.ca/estore/Product.aspx?language=en-CA&catalog=Online&catego ry=Soldering+Tools&product=6412004

BUT
Here it is on eBay ID #6412004 from a Canadian vendor who
will ship to the US (and still be a good deal)

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=ID%3A+6412004&_rdc=1

I got the same set in a box of other items at an auction and
found it (while not Pro quality), to be more than adequate
for doing just a few connections at a time.
You get the iron, 2 tips, solder sucker and some electronic
sized solder.

A couple of quick practice tries and away you go !

Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 - 10:38 pm:

Whoops – just noticed the US shipping is a bit of a rip-off.
Perhaps you can find it or something equivalent in the US.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Benoit on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 - 10:40 pm:

I don't think liquid solder is any good for electrical stuff.

Soldering is not that hard.

These kits are a pretty good way to build confidence:

http://www.spikenzielabs.com/Catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=44&p roducts_id=376


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 12:38 am:

If you have a good soldering iron you can put a smaller tip into it. If you have a cheapie just grind the tip to a fine point and then tin it with a bit of solder first. Remember the iron is to heat the part and the copper on the circuit board. You need to heat each and tin them. Once you have all three tinned (board, part to be soldered, and iron) then heat them with the iron and join them. You must hold them still until the solder solidifies. Remember you have to get it hot enough to melt the solder on the iron, part and board (way past the "ouch" point), but not hot enough to fry the component or melt nearby parts.

It is way easier than it sounds. I suggest you practice by removing integrated circuits from your television or cell phone. Another good place to practice is on any crimp-on connectors you have put into your car's wiring!

IMHO, TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 09:33 am:

Robert - This one ???

Don't know anything about this - other than the ad...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Pencil-Type-Soldering-Iron-Welding-Gun-Tool-Solder-T ube-Wire-45w-/271276896627?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f295cf173


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 09:52 am:

For PC wok, suggest you stay in the 30-35 watt range.Too large an iron (watts) can make it easy for newbies to lift a trace on a PC board.
Here's another option:

http://www.amazon.com/Sinometer-Watts-Soldering-Iron-listed/dp/B0006NNRW4/ref=sr _1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1394718218&sr=8-7&keywords=soldering+iron

Also for newbies, stay away from silver based solder. Tin/ lead is much easier to use. Either a 60/40 solder or a 63/37. But again make sure its rosin cored.

At the bottom of the page that's linked above you can find the solder you need if you can't find it locally.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 11:02 am:

Bud is correct 63/37 solder melts at 183 C
while the current lead free Tin-sivler-copper solder melts at 217 C


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