Magneto Post and Outside Oiler

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Magneto Post and Outside Oiler
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 05:46 pm:

Well, as I wait for my new exhaust nut from Bob's I decided to fix up my outside oil tube and clean the mag post. I removed the old copper tube which had two decent kinks, one at each end, where the tube bent to mate with the fittings. I also removed the mag post/oil fitting to shine the connections and to look for lint from the bands. No lint found.

Here are my questions with pictures:

How loose should the mag post pin be? mine has about 1/4 inch up and down play before it make contact with the spring inside the mag post.

Mag Post

I took a picture of the spot where the mag post pin rides on the magneto. does this look normal? I looks odd to me but maybe this is what they all look like. Should it be smoother here where the pin contacts or more centered?

Mag Post Contact


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 06:02 pm:

I don't know if mine is perfect by a long shot, but I had the 1/4 inch play you describe and the point of contact in my engine looked the same and it's been running about 10 years, so you should be fine!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 06:44 pm:

I have the same post on my '10 with the same amount of play and indentation in the pick upon the mag ring. 30 years later it is still going strong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 06:48 pm:

What you have is normal and OK.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 07:46 pm:

Great thanks for the info everyone.

Looking through the outlet oil hole, its amazing any oil gets up there, makes the 90 degree turn and then fills the copper pipe. The hole is allot smaller than I thought it would be.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 08:46 pm:

Can you blow through the hole? Best tests are: Will it run on mag? If you take loose the bottom connection and start up the engine, do you get a steady flow of oil? If answer to both is yes, it is good, if not, it needs replacement.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 05:53 pm:

How loose should the Mag Post pin be side to side? Mine seems to have allot of play there as well. Any concern here?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 05:39 am:

The play doesn't mean much if the contact to the internal spring is good so you can run on magneto. When you mount the magneto post the pin should make contact into the solder, held there by pressure from a spring inside the contact. You should feel when the pin gets in contact with the solder blob on the magneto on the way down when you're mounting the contact and you can probably determine if the distance is enough to get good enough spring pressure when it's screwed down in place with the three screws.

Some magneto post oilers doesn't deliver much oil at all. The best accessory oil device is the Terry Horlick/Texas T type, they're tapping the oil in line with the flywheel, getting much better pressure and flow.
http://www.texastparts.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=TTP&Product_C ode=T3081-HVOLKit&Category_Code=k

But some other mag oilers are good enough to at least replace the internal oil pipe. There has been occasions when T engines has ran for years without a functioning inner oil pipe without harm since the mag post oiler did deliver enough. So you'll have to test yours with the engine running as Norm describes above.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Adam Corts on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 02:08 pm:

I see what your saying about the spring pressure. It took a little bit to wrap my head around what the mag post was actually doing. I will check the flow. I might add a scoop to increase the flow some.

Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 08:24 am:

I agree with Adam. With all the twists and turns the oil must negotiate through tight areas and very small orifices, I don't believe the mag post oiler is nearly as efficient in getting oil to the front bearings as the outside oiler that attaches to the drivers side of the hogshead in line with the flywheel. As the flywheel turns counter clockwise (looking from the rear), it forces oil into the angled hole sending a virtual flood of force-fed oil to the front of the engine via a large outside copper line on the driver's side of the engine. So efficient is the hogshead mounted oil line that I plugged off my mag post oiler with a brass plug, but if you do plug yours off, be sure that the plug is not so long as to touch your mag post and ground your mag post to the engine. Jim Patrick

PS. My hogshead oiler was one of the fist prototypes and was installed by an oldtime Model T expert and inventor, named Jess Bonar in 1977. At the time, he was in his 70's and, lived in a mobile home park in Polk City, Florida and did all of his Model T work in an aluminum shed behind his mobile home. www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/313252.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 11:26 am:

The mag post type oilers of the past and present do work. But hogshead mounted outside fixture with scoop and big line to the front of the engine will move a vast more amount of oil.

Texas T Parts did a test, at fast idle, of the hogshead w/scoop vs. the mag post oiler. Note: tests done without magnets but 'oil slingers' on the flywheel. The performance was 15 times greater with the hogshead mount, moving 1 gallon (128 ounces) of oil per minute.

The mag post type moves 1 gallon (128) ounces in 15 minutes.

According to this Ford testing, the Ford internal funnel scoop moved 16 oz. in approx. 2min at fast idle (over 500rpm) or 1 gallon of oil in 16 minutes.

So the simple mag post oiler will move about an equal amount oil as the std. Ford internal funnel line. The outside mounted hogshead fixtures with scoop are indeed superior to moving oil.





Good




Better


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 11:40 am:

Personal experience + The claims made by Dan Treace give proof that a good working magneto oiler is sufficient to supply an engine with oil. I live at the top of a hill where I need to use Ruckstell for the first quarter mile. When I first installed the engine in my 26 Roadster, it ran for about 1/2 hour on magneto and then the magneto quit. I used battery for the next 10 years. It went on many tours, some going for a week at a time over all terrain. After 10 years I was working on a second T and decided to rewind the magneto coils. I did three sets of coils and installed one in the 26 Roadster. When I pulled out the engine I found out what had caused the first magneto to fail. It was the funnel off the internal oiler which had been too close to the magnets and was torn off which cut the windings of the magneto. So all I had of the internal oil line was the tube without any funnel. I also had a magneto oiler running from the magneto plug to the bolt at the front of the engine. I drove for 10 years that way and after I pulled the engine, all I did was take out a few shims from the bearings and install the new magneto coils and a new inside oil line.

Now, maybe if you have a speedster or some other engine to be driven at a very high speed under very severe conditions, you might get better service with the hogs head oiler, but you also need to make some sacrifices to the engine to do so. With the magneto oiler, all you need to make it stock again is replace one bolt and the magneto plug.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 03:07 pm:

Norm

Agree with you, using the mag post oiler is safe, simple and works to supplement the internal funnel oil line. So no brainier to add this simple accessory.

The hogshead mount does mess up Ford part, and lots more work, as I wouldn't place one without removing the hogshead. Boring big hole in the trans cover, and then running line to the front of the crankcase. Only have done it once, but happy with just the mag oilers from now on.



Easy to place new mag post oiler.



Fatally modifying the hogshead, sacrificed to speed :-(


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