OT - Happy Pi Day! 3.14 woo hoo!!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT - Happy Pi Day! 3.14 woo hoo!!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth from NC on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 08:00 am:

For any other math nerds or engineers:

A mathematician, a physicist, and an engineer are all given identical rubber balls and told to find the volume. They are given anything they want to measure it, and have all the time they need. The mathematician pulls out a measuring tape and records the circumference. He then divides by two times pi to get the radius, cubes that, multiplies by pi again, and then multiplies by four-thirds and thereby calculates the volume.The physicist gets a bucket of water, places 1.00000 gallons of water in the bucket, drops in the ball, and measures the displacement to six significant figures. And the engineer? He writes down the serial number of the ball, and looks it up.

Next year gets even better because it will finally be 3.1415!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 08:15 am:

There are only 10 types of people in the world--those who speak binary and those who don't!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 08:21 am:

O.K. Seth But I want Blueberry!
An accountant, an engineer and a lawyer are the final interviewees for a CEO position the board of directors calls in the Accountant and ask "What is 2+2" the account say's that's simple it's 4. The Board dismisses him and says we will call you. Then they call in the engineer and ask the same question. The engineer says that is trivial and beneath him but the answer is 4. The board dismisses him as they did the accountant, then they send for the lawyer and ask her the same Question. She walks over to the windows draws the shades opens her brief case pulls out a bug detector and sweeps the room then locks the door and says "Gentlemen, What would you like it to be?"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 08:24 am:

Mike I was typing at the same time you were, Can you say "assembler" ? Remember "punch cards"?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 08:27 am:

When I was in college, the school had one mainframe computer and we used punch cards to load our programs. A dozen keypunch machines and a few teletype printers were all in one room with a tile floor and concrete block walls. It was so noisy in there that you almost had to wear hearing protection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 08:34 am:

A math major and an engineering student, both male, are put at one end of a room. At the other end is an exquisite, eager-looking girl, totally nude. The instructions are that whoever gets to her first can have her. But first he has to get halfway to her, then half of the remaining distance, then half of the yet-remaining distance, - - - . The math major is dismayed. "Don't you see," he says, "that it's infinite? I'll never get to her!" The engineering student says: "I'll get close enough for all practical purposes."

My son loves to twit me with this one. He's an engineer, and I was a math major.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Brancaccio - Calgary Alberta on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 09:53 am:

22 / 7


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mario Goldberg A., Tenerife - Spain on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 10:02 am:

You don´t have to wait until next year.

In a couple of hours (here in Tenerife) it is going to be 3/14 15.93!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick J. Gunter on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 11:42 am:

Here’s my version:

A company was interviewing college graduates for a new position. They were asked only one question at the interview: “What is one plus one?”

First up was a Business major and his answer was, “On that’s so easy. It’s Two.”

Next up was a Computer Science major. He looked confused and asked, “Is that in decimal, binary, or hexadecimal?”

Next was a Biology major. She looked confused and asked, “What species, how many generations, and are they male and female?”

Next was a Mechanical Engineer. He said, "I’ll need to know the tolerances on that.”

Next was a student of philosophy. He looked really confused. After thinking about for a long time he replied, “That may be an unanswerable question.”

Next was a Divinity student. He quickly replied, “Oh there is only One, but He is actually three.”

Next was a Chemistry major. She looked confused and said, “I’ll need the atomic number of the elements from the periodic table and are either of them a radioactive isotope?”

The final interviewee was an Accountant. He just laughed, winked, and asked, “Well heck, what do you want it to be?”


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 12:55 pm:

Ya all left out the statistician
Two plus two is between 3 and 5.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Brancaccio - Calgary Alberta on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 01:08 pm:

I have been using 22/7 for years but reading these post did some more research and found this:

The fraction 355/113, which is very easy to remember, produces 3.1415929... in other words accurate to 6, almost 7 decimal places.

So now I will use this fraction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 01:16 pm:

In the machine shop I always used 3.1416. Close enough for a stinking fertilizer plant.

What's the deal? Are we having a pi holiday?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 01:35 pm:

Just for fun ... Pi to 1,000,000 places :-)

http://www.piday.org/million/

And then there is ...

From Guinness world records "

The record for memorising Pi was achieved by Chao Lu (China) who recited Pi from memory to 67,890 places, at the Northwest A&F University, Shaanxi province, China, on 20 November 2005.

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Vaughn on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 02:49 pm:

Not only is it Pi day it is Pi month!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 02:59 pm:

G.R.;

Do you mean Assembler (machine) Language?

Up until 1988, we used a Singer Friden System 10 that, I believe ran on Assember. This system didn't use punch cards, but its dummy terminals did require command names such as Inquir to run.

The big band printers were almost indestructible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Grohsmeyer on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 03:21 pm:

Sounds like a bunch of kids - I went to college in B.C.

ie. Before Computers.

Still have my slide ruler - had to buy the 'advanced' model to get thru the tough classes.

(You can still see what they look like if you do a search on this thing called the 'web'.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JIM WILSON, AMORY, MS on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 03:53 pm:

During college days we had the same huge main frame and key punch cards. The semester I took a programing course, they were swapping out main frames. When you program wouldn't run, you ever knew if it was your problem or theirs . Evidently they was some sort of limit that kicked you off when your printout got so high or weighed so much. I could go back the next day and things would work OK. Not sure anyone actually completed their project that semester. I saw my slide rule the other day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Claverie on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 04:25 pm:

Log, Log, Duplex, Decitrig. That's my slipstick!

I still have it, and I stare at it every once in a while and wonder what I should do with it. The leather case deteriorated long ago, but the rule still works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 05:02 pm:

I'm a Mechanical Engineer. My Dad is a Textile Engineer. He gave me his slide rule, but I don't really know how to use it. I can figure out how to do some simple calculations, but certainly not proficient and, like modern calculators, could never come close to using all the features it is capable of. His has several formulae printed on the side of it from the factory. He said his professors never knew they were there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 05:28 pm:

As long as we're talking scientists and engineers ...my favorite story to illustrate the difference.

A gorgeous nude blonde was placed in a room against one wall. A scientist and an engineer were brought in and told they were to perform an experiment. They had to start at the opposite wall and every minute they could walk forward and halve the distance between them and the blonde. Then they must wait another minute before they could walk again. Both were then asked how long it would be before they got to the girl.

The scientist walked off in disgust saying "this in an example of an asymptotic equation, no mater how close I get there will always be half the distance to go !"

When it was the engineers turn, he thought for a minute and said "In 15 minutes, I'll be close enough!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 09:55 pm:

I would challenge anyone who claimed they could name Pi to a million places or 67,890 or even 100 places. These performances have nothing to do with the circumference of a circle. The number Googol is 1x10 to the 100th power, the known universe can be measured in terms of the mass of an electron x 10 to about the 90th power. If the digits are to the right of the decimal you get just as imaginary number as you do with googol.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Friday, March 14, 2014 - 10:40 pm:

I remember back on the dark ages when I was in high school we manually filled out those punch card with a #2 lead pencil. Only fill in between the lines do not overfill the space between the lines.

After all that information was inputted and not folded , spindled or mutilated only then was the information available to the staff. How did they get the required information? The woman in charge of records actually used one of her knitting needles to put thru the specific hole in the perimeter of the card and shook the pile of cards until unneeded ones fell to her desk. The cards she wanted were still on her knitting needle. Boy this was high tech stuff back in the early 60's.

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Saturday, March 15, 2014 - 01:50 am:

We had a machine when I was a young machinist lovingly called a "Swede". It was, pardon the term, programmed to run with a punchcard. At times the card would drop through the reader and fall on the floor. The next thing it would attempt would involve trying to shove a high speed steel tool through a steel bar. Normally this would happen while the spindle was spinning at max speed and the tool (usually an expensive boring bar) was indexing as it would rapid feed into the chuck. Then came an invention lovingly referred to as "paper tape". We had just purchased a brand new Cincinnati Cinturn turning center. The year was 1978. The tape would feed through the reader and when it got to the end of the program it would reverse and do it again for the next part. Because I'd been schooled in the ways of machining in a tool and die program they made me a set-up man. Editing the program involved making a new tape. The machine had a 16 bit processor that was the size of a house and referred to as a computer. Earlier in my career I had the good fortune to work with a machine referred to as a calculator. It could perform simple arithmetic. It was a large mechanical apparatus that sat in a glass enclose box because it was sensitive to dust. When done correctly it was possible to enter a math problem that would cause it to run straight for eight hours or until it burned itself up. I've always believed if I'd had a scientific calculator in 1968 when I first started out I could have ruled the world in less than a week. I can't imagine the power I'd have had with an iPhone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By eugene story on Saturday, March 15, 2014 - 04:42 am:

we in the northern part of southern missouri, know that pi is not square, pi are round


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable on Saturday, March 15, 2014 - 08:04 am:

Eugene, In Australia and New Zealand we have square pie's!!
big ben

On a similar line, when I did teacher training we were reminded that if we wrote an examination question we should always make sure that the question would give the answer we required and we were told this story,

A science teacher set a question to gain the answer that a barometer could read altitude.

He wrote , "if you were given a barometer and were asked how high was a particular building what would you do with it.?"

One student wrote. I would take the barometer and using the triangular theory place it on the ground and by measuring the length of its shadow and that of the building along with the angle to the top of the building calculate the height.

He was marked WRONG and asked to answer it again.

" Taking the barometer I would measure its height and use it to mark off and count the number of times on the wall of the stair well as I climbed to the top of the building.

Wrong again he was asked to submit another answer.

"Taking the barometer to the top of the building I would drop it off and time its decent until it hit the ground and then calculate the distance using 32 feet per second.

The teacher by this time has run out of patience and gives the student one last chance to supply the correct answer or he will be marked incorrect.

The student submits his last answer.

" Taking the barometer to the basement I would take it to the janitor saying - if you tell me how high the building is I will give you this barometer."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Saturday, March 15, 2014 - 09:07 am:

Here is a great site for those who never had exposure to, or forgot how to use, the incredible slide rule.

http://sliderulemuseum.com/SR_Course.htm


Love the barometer story....LOL


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. Gustaf Bryngelson on Saturday, March 15, 2014 - 08:26 pm:

Peter, there is a woman who claims to be the smartest person in the world (Her last name is even vo Savant) and she cam up with the idea to drop the barometer from the roof or to trade it to the super for the information. I honestly believe she does not know what an altimeter is.


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