Spring leaf spreader/greaser

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Spring leaf spreader/greaser
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini on Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 04:47 pm:

I'm wondering if any one has used these and can either recommend them or tell me if they are a waste of time and money. The tool I'm talking about is the kind that you clamp onto the spring and has a grease fitting on it. It's supposed to spread the leafs enough to enable you to shoot grease between the leafs. Hope that makes sense. Anyway, you all are so knowledgeable and me being a relative newbie (bought my 14 two years ago next month) I know you'll be able to advise. Thanks in advance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 06:18 pm:

I have a simpler one that just spreads the leaves, then I brush slip-paint between the leaves. I would attach a picture, but I can't find the darned thing right now, if I find it I'll post a picture later.

It works fine, hopefully I'll find mine before the springs need another treatment!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 06:40 pm:

I wouldn't use grease at all. It attracts dust and dirt and looks messy. Spend a day and disassemble the springs. Clean them then paint the bottom of each leaf, except the bottom leaf, with slip paint. It will outlast you and won't need further maintenance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Wednesday, March 19, 2014 - 07:01 pm:

I found it! It was in the first drawer I looked in before, right on top, I was just looking right through it and not recognizing it for some reason.

spring_tool

When I put it away this time, I'm going to set it next to the can of slip-paint instead of dropping it into a drawer with dozens of other tools. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini on Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 04:55 pm:

Mark and Ken, thanks. It sounds like I only have to do the springs once after taking them apart, so the tool may not be worth it?

I've already done the front spring and have the rear spring apart as I am rebuilding the rear end after the drive shaft spool bearing sleeve disintegrated last fall. I'm using the Fun Projects modern replacement bearing for the drive shaft.

And, Ken, yes, you're right. I misspoke when I said "greasing" the leaves. But what is slip paint and where do I find it?

Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 05:15 pm:

The major T vendors carry it, I got a can from Lang's. There's enough in the can to last a lifetime. Be sure to shake it well before using.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 05:33 pm:

TSC stores or farm/fleet place will carry Slip-Plate. It is high carbon grease. If you get it on you,you wear it.I use a disposable acid brush and throw it away when through.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 07:06 pm:

I just make my own as I need it. I've got a can of graphite flakes. I mix one table spoon with about 6 ounces of black lacquer paint. Brush on then let dry.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 07:45 pm:

I use a product called Dry Film Lube. After dis-assembling the spring and sand blast, the areas between the spring leafs are coated using a brush or spray can and allowed to dry. The directions call for baking...It dries hard in the hot sun in several hours. Re-assemble the spring, use Lacquer thinner to remove any excess Dry Film, Prime and final paint spring. The Dry Film provides a very tough and durable surface.

Used this product during restoration of our 1910 2cyl. REO in 1978 and still no rust or paint pealing to date. The product has been used in the Air Craft industries for many years and was Mil-Spec qualified. Any dust that works out between spring leafs easily wipes off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, March 20, 2014 - 08:54 pm:



I just spray the front and back of the springs with either WD-40 or LPS-1 and let capillary action absorb the lubrication.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 10:49 am:

"what is slip paint"

It's basically black paint w/graphite in it. Comes in rattle cans or brush on. Ken Kopsky's idea sounds good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 04:07 pm:

I would not recommend WD-40. I would recommend this instead, which is actually a lubricant.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 04:29 pm:

I agree with Dan B., WD40 is not a lubricant nor a penetrating oil. It was formulated as a water dispersant, hence the WD, the 40 stands for the fortieth formula tried. It works great to clear out moisture in a distributor cap. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 04:44 pm:

Thanks to all!!! I knew you guys would come through. Now, I know what to do.


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