OT - Retirement

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT - Retirement
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 10:08 am:

It's been one year today and loved every single minute of it!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 10:41 am:

Gary;
I retired in 2000. It was fun, then came the divorce and the heart attack. Good Luck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 10:45 am:

13 years last Jan. Got out at 50. Heavy duty work title (diesel mechanic) got me out 5 years early.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By samuel pine on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 10:52 am:

Caution, I too retired in 2000 had a good job take home $700 + a week. Ya my retirement check does not work 14 yrs later now its $700 a month. Back then had boat 53 foot, motor home, toys all gone gave it all to taxes, I pissed through $80 grand since retirement, just in real estate taxes in this dump. 1/4 million dollar fire trucks to put out grass fires, new town trucks to replace antique 2010 ones. I wont even go near what schools waste.
So you enjoy now just wait 15 yrs later we don't get raises when you retire.

(Message edited by adminchris on March 21, 2014)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 11:01 am:

Retired 2 years now out on disability which has slowed me way down. I'm good for about 2 hours a day on my feet.

Retirement is a mixed blessing but I have failed to live up to my life long goal of retiring without a reduction in lifestyle.

Yup.... less money and more inflation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 11:05 am:

Not to rub it in Sam but retirement does require some planning. We down sized and made a few other changes but honestly $700 a month wouldn't cut it for me either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 11:13 am:

Samuel;
The only thing Good about my retirement is I'm living in Florida in a dump but enjoying the weather.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 11:14 am:

After leaving full time employment in 2004 I continued to work independently for a few years at about 50% then I fully retired in 2010. I can't say it's particularly good or bad. It's just not what I expected.

We're raising 2 grandsons due to the loss of our daughter in 2005 (she was a single parent). That means we have 2 teenage boys, which I didn't expect. My dad, at age 93, is an increasing consumer of time (my mother passed in 2007). He can't drive anymore, so I am the designated transportation for doctor, dentist, shopping, recreation, and all other things. My two grown sons seem to have "projects" for me from time to time. So, to an extent I'm caught in the middle of my younger and older generations.

There just never seems to be enough time for the things I want to do since I'm so busy with the things I must do. I think the most frustrating part is the fact that some people in my life think that because I'm "retired" I have nothing to do and am just waiting for them to ask me to do something for them. I get looks of astonishment when I say I'm too busy for something they asked me to do. Sometimes I wonder how I had time to work. I sure couldn't fit it in now.

I suppose it's an object lesson in remaining flexible and dealing with things as you must. Just because things aren't going the way you expected is not a problem. Even in our later years we must stay "flexed at the knees" if we expect to be content.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 11:22 am:

Hopefully the choice of retirement location allows us to maintain our previous lifestyle. We have opted to rent vs build or buy here tho.




(Message edited by adminchris on March 21, 2014)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 12:12 pm:

Charlie is right. Retirement requires planning but as Henry showed us, "life gets in the way".

We have a daughter, 2 grand kids and their dog moving in with us Sunday and we have NO idea how long they will be here.

THAT will cut into our "hot-tubbing" habits! ;) The wife brow-beat me into getting one but I am amazed how good I feel when I get out of it. We live in the woods surrounded by trees so no one can "see in". I have had to unload and hide my guns and medications as well. (bear and meth-head deterrents)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 12:19 pm:

108 Weeks to go :-(

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 12:37 pm:

John,
Take it from someone who's been there. Hiding meds and guns is not good enough. You must put them under lock and key!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 01:38 pm:

Retired last year, have no regrets, don't have many wants, made it through heart surgery three years ago. I am blessed, three grand children to spend time with now, they like the T rides and make me feel like life's worth living. Not going to take anything with me when I go but hope to leave behind some good memories. Life is what it is, make the best of it. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 04:12 pm:

Sixty seven and still working 50-60 hours a week. Every thing costs too much. Don't want to retire and not be able to afford to do anything. I guess I could quit and hope not to live too long and not leave anything for my family but I'd just as soon keep working. Maybe when I'm 75 or so I'll call it quits.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JIM WILSON, AMORY, MS on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 04:20 pm:

Retired Jan 2000 at age 61 after 40 years in Aerospace engineering job. Benefited from an early retirement buy-out. I loved my job, well last few years in engineering management were a drag, but had to go that route to get a promotion. I walked away and never looked back. Retirement has been great


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 05:28 pm:

Keith,
You have the right attitude, we all could learn a thing or two from you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Klem on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 05:37 pm:

Been retired over 8 years now.
Work harder physically though.
Do what I want, when I want.
My wife still works, and I am pleased that I have the time to do the dishes & vacuum, etc.
Planning ahead is very important!
It'a a wonderful life :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 06:55 pm:

Been on the retirement binge for about 3 years now and hated the first 2. Now that I've decided to draw every bloody aspect of the Model T cars and trucks, I'm finally enjoying it, the only way it would be even better, if I were making money doing it, lol. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 07:21 pm:

I retired "early" after 30 years in public schools, started super young, at age 13, so when my time was up, you betcha I took it! Never looked back. Blood pressure dropped from 140ish over 92 to 110 over 70 in less than two months after retiring! Yeh, don't have much extra money to spend, especially wouldn't ya know this is when I decided to finally realize my dream of owning an antique car. Now I have five! But, in a couple of years no doubt I will have to sell off one or two in order to keep up with expenses, but hoping I can hold out 4 more years until the wife and I both qualify for a reverse mortgage to keep the wolves away. We'll see. Main thing is, slow down your goals, desires, and spending, and things will be OK. I put my faith in the Lord to carry me through. He always does.
Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob McDonald-Federal Way, Wa. on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 07:29 pm:

I've been fortunate, I retired 23 years ago, the first 10 years we both worked some part time, then my wife past but I still remember the good times we had. I then retired again. Now I have a girl friend and help her with her Real State Appraisal business and tinker with my Ts. Life is good, but I think that the coast of living will keep most of the younger generation from ever retiring with any ability to enjoy life. My life is good but I know to many others that are barely making it and some that are lousing everything they've worked all there for (thanks to big brother)..
To all enjoy what you have, and be thankful.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By RJ Walworth, New York on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 07:31 pm:

Retired 2007 at 52yrs old from a big company, took the buy out..take the money and run.. RE-Started my father n law's (deceased 2007) wire business along with my current fastener business. I'll work in my own shop making automotive parts for the catalog companies.. love it.. teaching local kids how to make antique car parts and working on my cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 07:44 pm:

John. I have a lot of respect for you because I believe that it is a parents responsibility to take care of their kids when they get into trouble and need help.
I am 69 and would like to retire but we found that my daughter's husband was abusing her and my granddaughters
About a quarter of a million dollars later - lawyers, councilors, therapists, specialists, and schools - my daughter now has a nursing degree and a good job.
The best part is that I now get to see my granddaughters on a regular basis

I am telling you to enjoy the time with them - family, daughters, grandchildren are blessings. Grandpa can make a big difference in their lives.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 09:43 pm:

I sort of "retired" a few years ago at 53. But really all I did was knock down to part time work. It has been great. I work as much or as little as I want. That gives me additional time to do the things I want and give back to my community by volunteering and helping deserving neighbors. I watch my financial resources, but then again I always lived within a budget. I maintain a simple lifestyle and like it that way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 09:49 pm:

Well, i got hurt at 38,retired at 39 and I am 47 now.
Retirement was something I was really looking forward to because I was going to put in my 30 at NCDOT and then use the CDL's i had to maintain and get a job driveing a truck cross country for a few years and see some of the country.
Well I guess I said the words,"I cant wait till I can retire" 1 to many times and I didnt have to wait no more.
Now it is 700 a month and a little scratch I make on the side and hurt most of the time.Just sent off my motion and opening brief to the federal court house as part of the process of fileing my appeal for my social security. I dont envy a lawyer quite as much as I used to after digging thru my 600 page transcripts trying to find all the faults in the decisions.
sheesh.
But I have longer life wise to enjoy retirement I guess.Kinda odd situation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 10:13 pm:

I'm planning to retire in 1034 months. That may seems like a long time, but I really love my job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 10:23 pm:

I retired in 1996 at 50! Now it's a race to either run out of time or money! Suger,heart attack,cancer twice,many are not so lucky! Enjoy what time you have!! Bud in Wheeler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 10:29 pm:

I worked in the factories for 41 years and retired at age 59. The first years I spent broke because I had to quit for medical reasons from issues acquired in Viet Nam and because I broke 4 lumbar vertabrae, my leg and had some severe burns. I was awarded disability from the VA and from Social Security. I also started drawing on my pension. That took care of my money issues. Then the old lady got tired of my BS and I was asked to find some other place to live. It was one of those amiable divorces where she got the farm (aka gold mine) and I got the shaft. I moved into a doublewide, bought my Model T's my vette and some other things I'd always wanted and now, though I'm a little crippled up and spent 17 months on chemo-therapy I'm happier than I've ever been. It's just me the dog and a couple cats. I've always got something going on in my life, my finances work out, I've made a lot of good friends and hope this goes on for a long time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Severn - SE Texas on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 11:08 pm:

I retired in 2002. My wife got Alzheimers in 2004 so I Un-retired to make sure I would have the money for her care. She passed away in 2011.

I'm still working full-time at the age of 80 and don't intend to quit. It feels good to be needed and to stay busy. Got a house to care for, two dogs who are my kids, and oh yeah, a lady friend to keep me on the straight and narrow. Life is good when you keep it interesting.

I'll be driving model T's for years to come.

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 11:40 pm:

My father retired at 50 and I was determined to retire younger than he did. So I retired at 49. since then I have gotten married gave my new younger wife my Subaru business. She has more than doubled the business and added a 2nd store.

Now I "work" Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings until 10 am. I tend to the repairs, chatting with old customers and generally being seen. Oh yes Thursdays I'm a welcomed guy, that's the day I bring apple fritters for the employees.

I don't get paid real money, I do get lots of perks, company car, credit cards, insurance and get to sleep with the boss.

Not bad for an old guy,

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Friday, March 21, 2014 - 11:51 pm:

Bill, you sound like a good example for a lot of young people to learn from. I have a 75 year old friend who was a master plumber. He retired when he was 72. Retirement is driving him up the wall and he would love to go back to work. The problem is he sold all his tools. His wife who's 71 went back to work cleaning a business every day for a couple hours. They're trying to live on a pretty limited budget and it worries me that they are going to be okay. This winter was tough on them. I cleaned snow for them and always ask if they need anything when I'm in town but they're a couple of tough kids and I'm in awe of their strength. Currently Uncle Sam is tearing them up pretty good with all the tax they need to pay. Between taxes, insurance, the price of heating fuel and medicine they're always on the edge. Like you these are people who worked unbelievably hard their entire lives. They should have a great retirement and they're making the best of what they've got. But when I see their next door neighbor pregnant with their 4th kid in as many years bringing boxes of food home from the food shelves, using their Obamacard to buy food, their Obamaphone to call and text on and know they're getting housing and heating assistance I get really disappointed with the state of our country. He's working at a lousy wage for 8 hours a day, has no desire to move ahead and always has enough money for his beer and cigarettes. The difference is pride. And these days there is no pride in being a working man. There's more pride in sucking on the government teat and dropping babies to increase their place in life. Stay strong Bill, your kind are few and far between and I respect you immensely.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 12:47 am:

I am currently (as of Sept 2013) on total Social Security Disability. I get more per month than my 72 year old father does in retirement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 02:27 am:

Well, I was laid off last July at age 60. Had to take my retirement or lose all my sick leave, so I get ~$700 a month, Unemployment ran out Jan 1; no work in my field around here (or almost anywhere else, museum curator & Performing Arts Tech Manager), so I'm back to tuning pianos--not a really popular item anymore. Starting to build up, but slow. Wife is was nearly laid off with a hospital reorganization (she gets about 5 days of work a month now, so is also looking). So I guess I'm "retired" but it is definitely a smaller world for us now.
Fortunately I have all the parts on hand for my '25, but most of my time is spent getting work & cleaning the yard for fire safety.
So enough moaning etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 07:46 am:

I took early retirement in 2001. Best thing I ever did!
Since that time, I have finished quite a few cars that I've had put away. I got remarried to a girl I've known since she was 17 (to bad that didn't happen years ago). Also, if you have followed any of my posts, I now have two grandson's. We watch them three days a week. The first is definitely car oriented. I enjoy him so much I take him everywhere I go. He is only 2 1/2 and we have taken him on a couple tours including a National tour. He will be going on many more. He has slowed me down some on my current project but well worth it. The second grandson is six months old, hopefully he will be like the first. I have enough projects stored away (T's, V-8's and 50's Fords and Mercs) that I will never be bored, as long as my funds don't run out. Living in the Northeast, the disadvantage is no touring during the winter, the advantage is it forces me in the garage to get cars done. But once the summer gets here we are out driving!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lonnie Smith on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 10:13 am:

In theory I could retire next year at age 50 without any real concerns but it would cut into my toy buying drastically so I'll keep working. I enjoy my job in the construction field.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 10:34 am:

You know you do what you have to in some cases then you read about folks like the one's Mike mentioned. This may sound un-feeling but damn it if you don't help yourself no body else will. Your quality of life depends on your actions. Big talk for some one that planned ahead right? Here's a news flash guys: that's how it's done. Down size, pull back. You have to if finances dictate. Take some of the burden off yourself. You'll be happier for it. Government "suckers"? They've always been there and they always will be and you know what? If you can improve your quality of life, even if it means just putting food on the table you need to go for it. Some people on these programs actually need them and use them as they were expected to be used. To live.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 10:38 am:

Retired (sort of) in 2010. Got my social security at 62. We have our home and property paid for. It was paid off 15 years before I retired(sort of).
I worked for the State of Texas 33 years so I do get something from the State.
Never made big money but we were careful how we spent what we made. I took my Fathers advice that its not how much you make its WHAT YOU DO WITH WHAT YOU MAKE that makes the difference.
I stay busy with the farm, 3 Model T's, our Church, and occasionally still playing in our classic rock and country band.
Gotta keep moving to stay alive. Retirement IS NOT going fishing and sitting the rest of the time in a recliner. Had prostate cancer and brain surgery from a fall but have to keep moving so I can still move!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 11:41 am:

Our home etc is paid for as well which makes life so much easier (mentally). I must admit feeling frustrated when I have to pay to have something done I previously would have done myself (firewood acquisition for example). So for me retirement really is a mixed blessing.

Then Fridays like yesterday come along, warm, sunny, so the wife and I cranked up 2 of our T's and went to town (10 miles away)! THATS the retirement we like!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 08:25 pm:

Charlie B you're right on the money. Well until something takes your savings and all you've got left is a small pension and some Social Security. If your retirement is eaten up by a gambling or drinking problem you've got very little to complain about. When you've worked your whole life and your saving are taken because of poor health for you your spouse or immediate family member it gets a little more tricky. I was retired for two years when my marriage fell apart after 33 years. The farm was paid for and though it was only 40 acres and the 15 year old house was totally remodeled the judge looks at everything including your retirement and splits it down the middle. Now you get half the value of what you had and you need to purchase a house which in my case turned out to be a mobile home, furniture and dished and there's the expense of moving what you end up with and your in a state of mind and rational thought doesn't happen. It's near impossible to plan for that. You lose the synergy of having two people working toward a common goal. Your on your own and everything you thought you had is gone. You cannot set aside enough to prepare for your retirement with all that happening. And it's going to be worse as we go farther down the road. Our new affordable care act isn't for many of us. And though it sounds like excuses our current political makeup doesn't care about seniors. And these days especially in the last 10 years divorce among people in their 50 and 60's is becoming very prevalent. I would never argue that it's important for working people to start saving now for retirement then pray your livelihood isn't affected by situations you have little or no influence over. It's sad to know people who are attempting to cut their diabetes medicine doses in half so they last longer and they can afford meat and potatoes for at leas 3 or 4 meals a day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Micheal Crowe on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 10:32 pm:

I took retirement at 62, I have never looked back. I do have part-time job. But I do have lots of time to do what I want to.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 10:33 pm:

Charlie, I was planning ahead, and then the market crash came and almost overnight our retirement fund disappeared--never to come back. It was supposed to be a safe, stable stock, but the Panzi schemes did us in.
Then I thought I would have enough time to recover and be ready at 65, and at 60 the city eliminated my position. So now I'm starting over, and it takes time--especially in this 'recovery'!
And now they want me to buy healthcare that my doctor won't accept!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 12:00 am:

That's the way things really happen. In 1992 when everything went in the toilet my retirement went with it. In 2000 it happened again. These were on low risk mutual funds. Then 8 years later I broke my back, my legs and burned my legs bad enough the flesh fell off. Then in 2009 I started a 17 month stint of interferon and ribaviron (slow long lasting chemo). At the time I was able to heal and pay for my care through my wife's insurance and the VA helped with the chemo. Then in 2011 I walked in the house on Easter Sunday and she broke the news to me, after 33yrs she had talked to a lawyer and the plan was to serve papers on me the next day. I had to find a place to go immediately. Though the lawyer claimed things were split down the middle nearly $140,000.00 was missing when the dust settled and it was all from my share of the settlement. All that and some expensive medications because of a brain tumor and a tumor on my adrenal glands (and they said it wasn't because of Agent Orange) and I've had to build my life over again. These welfare whores that are getting a free ride on my dime don't deserve what they get. I paid into Social Security for 41 years and I'm being told I shouldn't be able to draw on it because it's an "entitlement". Free healthcare, free telephone and text, low cost housing and heat assistance being paid for by using my Social Security to people that have never worked a day in their lives is an "entitlement". And now the head man in Washington is screaming income inequality. He wants to take money from hard working successful business owners and give that to the non-working. I agree there are people who need the programs but there's more just plain abusing them. Here's an idea; why don't the freeloaders go get jobs and start saving for their retirement and leave my retirement alone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrison_Rice Minnesota on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 12:28 am:

And I apologize for my last post. I'd erase it if I could but I seem to be too late. Maybe it's time for this thread to go away. And again I apologize.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 12:34 am:

Why apologize. Retirement is a joy for some, a death sentence for others. It is a touchy subject and it stirs up all kinds of emotions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike dixon on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 09:08 am:

mike, hope things get better, the problem i feel is here to stay, there are way too many people on the government nipple now. this is the new norm. I am a small business owner, 32 years, I just signed up for my ss at aage 62, I can adjust my earnings, as not to go over the limit. I was afraid it would not be available at age 66.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Green on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 10:11 am:

I have been reading all these posts and in some cases you are not Robinson Crusoe, there are those who just use the system all their lives and those who have pride in them selves and just keep going no matter what life hits them with. Just remember when arguing with those on the welfare system that use it to their advantage, they will pull you down to their level and beat you to death, They can afford all the beer and cigarettes and games to play but not any food for their kids and clothes but the "DO GOODERS" give them that, you and your country are not the only one with this problem. When I was younger I wanted to move to America to live and I did stay there for a while in 1970 to 74 but I could not contemplate doing that now. I do not believe I could survive under your system of living and tax's and so many law enforcement agencies. I retired about 7 years ago and it was on medical grounds so I was able to get a good pay out which any one working there now will never get but I have worked since I was 16 and have never asked for a penny from the government and now I nearly own my own house and small farm I have to much assets so I can not get a pension or health card, we are dinosaurs from another time and we were taught to be fair in what you did, honour your parents and family and speak in a civil and polite manner and always help others, some thing many young people of today have cast out the window and its all about what they want and what they have the right to have with not working for it. Its a sad world we live in but you can make your own good time if you try... Ray


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Dwyer on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 10:22 am:

Mike, no need to apologize. That's what friends are for, to be a shoulder now and then. I'd guess that most guys here feel just like you --- nobody at any level of our government cares about people like us.

I had a good job at IBM for 17 years then got laid off. Had to take a job paying about 1/3 of what I made, and never have been able to find anything better. And the older you get, no one wants to hire you for anything. I figure I'm unemployable at 53 even though I have a PhD in Physics.

While at IBM the plan was to retire after 30 years at 54 with a full pension and health benefits for life. Now I'll be very lucky to retire sometime in my 60's all on my own dime.

My neighborhood has high property crime -- lots of burglaries and everyone knows who does it. Several "Obama people" have moved in, are on welfare, food stamps, every gubbamint program you can think of. They are the absolute worst parents you can imagine --- their kids grow up wild with no supervision, no sense of ethics or morality, right or wrong, and break into virtually every home in the neighborhood. All while the gubbamint takes our money to support these scumbags. And does it do any good to complain to our government? Hell, no. We're just middle class taxpayers. We have no representation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Green on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 10:52 am:

Hi Scott, you are so right, but even young people are being made redundant now, My son had a great job with Yahoo and a good wage and they just sacked every one on the spot and moved to china and at 27 with uni and collage degrees in "IT" he could not get a job and was told to go on the welfare. To his credit he said no and went and joined the army so he could have a job and I would give him top praise for being able to do that. Now he is putting his life on the line so others can sit around and sponge on his sweat and blood. He has just come home last Friday and now in a weeks time will return for a third tour in Afghanistan and yet the welfare cowards and greeny politicians sit and heap the scorn on the military personnel for fighting for the rights of other. I get so pissed off with many of today's society


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 11:28 am:

I'm very, very lucky. I have plenty to eat, a dry place to sleep, and good enough health to not dwell on my ailments. That means I'm better off than millions of folks who aren't so lucky. That I enjoy many blessings has more to do with unearned good fortune than with my own wisdom and efforts.

Late in 2010 the owner of the sign factory decided that it wasn't profitable enough, and decided to shut it down. So in April 2011 the shop closed and I retired. (It was later sold and reopened.) I thought I would stay retired long enough to get caught up on projects at home, a few months maybe, then look for something else to do. Soon it will be three years, and I haven't started looking. The projects that awaited me three years ago just seem to have multiplied.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 11:43 am:

I wrestle with this retirement thing all the time. How much annual income does it take to maintain a decent paid for home, a couple of decent cars, go out to eat when you take the notion, utilities, taxes , insurance, usual health care etc. I changed the belt, oil, filters on my mower and spent the better part of a hundred bucks doing the work myself. Seems like 60-80 would be marginal. Just can't get my head around it so I keep working.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ROBERT J STEINER on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 11:52 am:

The biggest thing right now with the big companies is cancelling the healthcare for the retirees. Kodak just did that last year for some 25,000 retirees. Allot of companies were downsizing and offering early retirement to get rid of people & offering great benefits now these same companies are going bankrupt and the bailout is to cancel the healthcare benefits for the same retirees.. CEO's & Upper Management need to make more money in their pockets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 12:28 pm:

We're in the same boat as many others. Due to the economy and schemers our retirement fund was depleted. We had a paid for home and vehicles that we knew we wouldn't be able to support on our retirement income so we sold that and moved to where we could retire. We live here on one income till I'm able to collect SS in October. Is this a move for everyone. Certainly not, but for us it's a perfect fit.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 12:54 pm:

John M., probably the biggest thing when you retire is you pretty much give up saving any money. We used to sock as much away into the annuity and credit union as my take home pay was, maybe even more the last 10 years. We live on less than 30K a year, and over $500 a month of that is just the health insurance for the two of us. Due to Obamacare, that is destined to almost double in cost. Prop. taxes are another 240 a month. So we don't have much left for "living", but we're getting by. Fortunately the house is paid off, but for now I'm funneling every extra dime into the cars. Fortunately I sold our boat for a decent price, but half of that went to pay for the new steel roof on the house, but I wanted the best so I wouldn't have to ever worry about a roof again.

Mike G....yes, don't apologize. You're spot on. And we're in a never ending spiral of "sponges" which is just what this govt. seems to want. Between getting people locked into the freebie game and I don't care what anybody says, Obamacare is designed to decimate what's left of the so-called middle class by gouging us with less health insurance for MORE COST so again it can take care of the free-loaders with their cheap insurance. Enough of the soap box.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 01:00 pm:

robert j is on track. i saw a tv documentary once that said in 1980 the wage difference between blue collar and upper level management was 35 to 1, now its over 400 to 1. we must all remember to work harder for the ceo's and stock holders.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 01:23 pm:

Like Steve above, I have plenty to eat, place to sleep etc.
Before retirement almost 6 years ago, (Retired at 66 years old) I managed to get all bills paid off and went on a cash system.
I use a credit card, but it is paid in full every month. Credit card company probably does not like me.
About a year ago I was lucky to get a small piece of land into a tiny percentage of a very poor oil well. I can see the pump jack from my house and call it my "BEER PUMP'. (About a $100 a month) I do not do those ice cream runs, but there is a good county bar that I often drive my model T to. Life is good and this farm has to much work to keep up with.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 02:07 pm:

I find this thread interesting. Clearly we each have a little different view of life after 60ish. I'll share a true story as a related item:

Several years ago an employee asked me for retirement advice. She told me her husband was retiring that year after 35 years with CalTrans and her question was, "Should I retire now with him or work another year? Which is better?" I said since we know her age, salary and years of service (we worked in a CA public school district) it would be easy to calculate a pension amount for now and for the following year. I asked if "better" meant more lifetime money. She said, "Yes." I said, "OK. Then I only need one more piece of information. When are you going to die?"

She looked startled at first, then smiled and said, "That's what it really boils down to, isn't it?" Then we had a conversation about retirement income adequacy, lifestyle maintenance, health, family health history, etc. She decided to retire with her husband.

Her husband passed away unexpectedly 12 months later. If she had waited another year they would have had no time as retirees together.

I guess the moral of the story is that we must each pay our nickel and take our chances.


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