Advise on disassembling T coupe cab

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Advise on disassembling T coupe cab
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Mclellan on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 01:05 pm:

How far should one go? Cab is in really nice shape, so not sure I should be removing all the nuts and bolts and taking the top half right off?

What's the best way to remove the from windshield? The screws are pretty rusted in there and I'm thinking of removing the entire header, then carefully removing the screws that attach the windshield hinge to the header while off the cab.

I'm also thinking that the top door hinge may be more accessible at that point.

There are also some Nasty fasteners on the rear posts (post between the rear side glass and door) they look like a roofing nail, but they just don't want to come out! (they seem to be holding what's left of a weather strip?)

I'll snap some pics so you can see what I'm talking about.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Mclellan on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 01:36 pm:

I removed all of the screws successfully from the door jam inner finishing plate and it would seem that all that's holding it now would be those darn shingle nail fasteners.

Thought I could knock off the head and hammer it through with a punch, but even that does not seem to work.

This is the fastener I'm talking about


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Mclellan on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 02:25 pm:

Is it common practice to remove rivets and replace? Options for replacing rivets with technique other than hot riveting?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 04:23 pm:

Robert, the flat "roofing nail" is actually a one-way pin that holds the upholstery to the frame. Just pry it out and toss it. It is held in place by brass inserts that are not reusable. The new replacements are plastic and are also one-way one-time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Sunday, March 23, 2014 - 04:25 pm:

Also, you need to remove them all because you will need those holes for the new upholstery. Take a thin sharp chisel if need be.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Mclellan on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 12:18 am:

I had no trouble with all of the interior "one way" pins that were holding the upholstery on with the brass inserts, they either came out or the entire brass insert came with, so no problems there.

These ones do Not seem to have an insert. So they go straight into the metal and they are Tight. So tight, that I tried punching one through with a hammer and pointed punch and it didn't budge and I was hitting it pretty hard.

Gonna try again tomorrow and drill out if need be.

Just to be clear, these pins are going through the inside post and right into the rear inner door jam finishing plate. I have all of the screws for that plate removed and can't get the plate out until I get rid of the three pins.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Murray - Anacortes, WA on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 12:43 am:

Robert, Here is a photo of how far I went:

TT

It may be prudent to and save as many of the threaded inserts by leaving them in, and running a tap in them to clean them up for now. But, you'll have to do it again after primer and paint during reassembly. I used a die grinder to take rusty rivets, bolts, nuts, screws off during disassembly. I love that tool !!!! The process makes a lot of rusty dust and flying metal, so it may be prudent to wear safety glasses and a particle mask.

TT

W


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike conrad on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 01:24 am:

Wayne, who's the young guy behind your coupe? He sure is talanted as your coupe is one of the nicest around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Murray - Anacortes, WA on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 02:22 am:

Hey Mike, I Dunno ?? It's somebody that I used to know ? W


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Mclellan on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 10:34 am:

Wayne, Nice! You may have just answered a question I was asking myself last night. I was thinking about separating the rear top half, but wasn't sure if I liked the idea of separating the front "over the door" jam steel from the front pillar.

I see you kept that area in tact. So did you hot rivet it all back together when done?

Gonna try and solve the mystery of the crazy tough "pins" today and hopefully get that inner jam plate removed :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Mclellan on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 02:57 pm:

So here's the "Shingle nail head" pin fasteners I was fighting with.



I knocked the head off of the bottom one and it left a "residual" head that I ground flush. (should have been more careful with my grinding, whoops)

As you can clearly see, there is No insert, just steel.



So I hit it a couple times (pretty hard) with a mallet and punch. To see if I could drive it through, but to at least leave a center punch for my drill bit.



Then I drilled it through, just enough that the inner door jam finishing plate will come out.



Once I finish drilling them all out and removing the inner door jam finishing plate, I'll finally get to see what the other half of them looks like, and maybe a clue as to why they would Not simply punch through!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Mclellan on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 08:03 pm:

In the end Don was right in that these appear to be the same pin fastener that is used with the insert. For whatever reason, these were put into the steel body which made them nasty to get out. I think the problem was mostly from them going through the second layer of steel. (the door jam finishing panel)

That's probably why even after knocking off the head and hitting them with a punch, they wouldn't pop through, just bend one way or the other on the inside jam panel as they wee anchored in it, Not so much in the body panel. (I think I did get to knock one clean through)





Now that the door jam finishing panels are removed, you can see where the pin fasteners are still sticking through the backside. (what's left of them)


You can also see how much was left on the other side of that panel (this would be the gap between the body and this panel) and the reason they wanted to bend instead of punching clean through. (I probably hit the one perfectly centered for it to go through)


Also, Victory over the pesky upper door hinge!!!! Yeha! It was a pain, but I managed to drill out the broken screw and remove the back side of it to get the hinge to slide through the narrow slot. Now you can see what I was trying to describe when I said it had a 90 degree bend in it while the other two hinges are straight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Irvin on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 11:12 pm:

Used a 4.5 inch die grinder with a 20 grit wheel and a center punch to get mine apart


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 01:07 pm:

Is it really necessary to totally dismantle a solid improved all steel body? When I purchased my '26 coupe in 1970, it did not have a bit of paint on it and was covered in thick rust, yet, I did not feel the need, nor inclination to dismantle the body and my restoration did not suffer for it, as there has been no rust poking through at the seams in the last 44 years. Just eliminated a lot of unnecessary work for me.

Just the fact that the thing is so hard to get apart as evidenced in this thread is testament to how well they were built and that one will have a difficult time getting the body back together as solidly and permanently as it was assembled at the factory. Good luck. Jim Patrick



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 06:55 pm:

i agree, if it aint fallin apart, leave it together. i see some old paint in the photos, it cant be that bad


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Baker on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 07:57 pm:

If it was that hard to take it apart I would have left it together


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 08:06 pm:

OT- beautiful coupe Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 09:44 am:

Thank you Gary. Every weekend, weather permitting, I take "Miss Daisy" out for a drive, which is the highlight of my week. Jim Patrick


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