Inner sleeve removal: the easy way

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Inner sleeve removal: the easy way
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 04:47 pm:

It can be a real booger, so I took it to the machine shop at the juco and cut it with a 1/4" end mill.


Being careful not to go too deep and cut into the shaft, I cut a groove the length of the sleeve. A couple of whacks with a hammer and it was off, easy as pie. Sure beats work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 04:50 pm:

Great idea!

I guess the white powdered doughnuts are gone until next winter, eh? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 05:04 pm:

I expect so. Maybe I'll get the doughnut stands put away before then. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 05:52 pm:

I used a similar method; a cutting wheel on a dremel, being careful not to go too deep. Worked like a charm. Fairly easy to control the depth of the cut with the small size of the dremel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erich Bruckner, Vancouver, WA on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 06:11 pm:

I like it.


Now I need an easy way to install it without heavy equipment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 08:45 pm:

I intend to never fool with installing another one. For me it's the FP bearing from now on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 09:16 pm:

Here is a way to install a new sleeve. You get one chance, so be sure it is straight and the key lines up with the slot. Heat up the sleeve in a hot oven and use your oven mitt to hold it. Then push it on the shaft. It expands with the heat, but as soon as it cools off, it will get tight. So be sure to do it right the first time!
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 09:29 pm:

Not me. BTDT. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 07:37 am:

I second the FP bearing motion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 09:06 am:

Hi Steve, glad you were able to get the sleeve off with the end mill method. I was surprised that an end mill would cut it--I assumed that sleeve would be too great a hardness even for for a carbide end mill. Did it mill easily? Just wondering. Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 09:29 am:

I will have to 'third' the motion for the FP bearing. This is one T improvement that really is an improvement. Easy installation and adjustment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 09:33 am:

The sleeve is hard but the work is easy. The end mill was only 1/4", so I worked verrrry slowly so as not to break it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 09:50 am:

While there still are lots of good rear axle Hyatts around, the driveshaft Hyatts seems to wear more, so very few of the old ones I've seen at swaps are any good - only one out of 8 I've got in my stash was good enough to use. Is there a better ratio of good/bad ones in USA?

I've torn down two driveshafts, both were damaged internally, one had a crack in the pinion bearing housing, the other was cracked in one of the Hyatt rollers. This could be a safety hazard, nothing wrong was felt but if they had been used any more there could have been a catastrophic driveshaft failure with brake loss and who knows what..

So Fun Projects bearing it is for me too if the original parts are worn out.
http://www.funprojects.com/products/2587e1.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andrew Deckman, Ogden Utah on Sunday, March 30, 2014 - 11:42 am:

I looked for the original parts and could not find them so I went with FP as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Sunday, March 30, 2014 - 11:16 pm:

i cut too deep.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, March 30, 2014 - 11:22 pm:

If you're using the FP bearing, I don't think a little nick or groove on the shaft will matter.


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