OT - 110 V Electric Motor

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: OT - 110 V Electric Motor
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 09:26 pm:

Can any 110 volt motor be run through a rheostat to slow it down?
Trying to make a ceiling fan out of a 72" airplane prop.
Thinking of a washing machine motor.
Thanks for any help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Zahorik on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 09:56 pm:

No, any induction motor like a wash machine motor works from frequency. To change it's speed you have to change the frequency. Sorry
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By david sullivan on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 10:21 pm:

Can use three phase motor and (variable frequency drive) available from (automation direct) or others not terribly expensive


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Monday, March 24, 2014 - 10:26 pm:

Thanks guys.
I'll admit to being electrically challenged!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 12:13 am:

Hi Bob

A 90 or 130 volt DC motor with a KBMD 240D Multi Drive would work.
Here is my install on a Taig mini lathe using a HP 3600rpm 90V DC motor.
This controller (drive) does the AC to DC conversion with variable
speed but pre-setable min/max speed, adjustable soft start and reverse.
Input is 110 or 220V and can handle up to HP 90/130 Volt
motors without the heat sink mount. 1HP or so with heat sink option.
Other drive specs are available, and all are expensive new
but can be found surplus, as can the motors.

http://www.kbelectronics.com/Variable_Speed_DC_Drives.html



Regards
Art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By A. J. "Art" Bell on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 12:34 am:

I should mention that many treadmills have DC motors with adjustable speed control circuit boards,
and are often found holding up laundry in a closet some where.

Cheap or free if you check around . . .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 12:44 am:

Thanks Art.
It's amazing how much knowledge is floating around Model Ts!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 07:10 am:

Why not just buy a variable speed ceiling fan and adapt the prop to it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 07:31 am:

That's exactly what I was thinking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 08:05 am:

I think the starting torque from a large prop on a small ceiling fan motor may cause it to burn out prematurely. If you just want the prop to spin for show and not be adjustable you can set it at one constant speed with a gear reduction unit attached to the motor shaft. That way you can use a washing machine motor and set the speed you want.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 08:29 am:

How are you going to hang it? Even if you find or make something it need's to be strong enough to defy gravity,viberation,and starting tourge.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 09:13 am:

I'm still in the thinking stage now.
Just being a Model T cheapskate and use what's on hand.
I have wheel bearings, tubing, bar stock and a big old lathe and welders etc. to make the stuff to mount it.
Also more time than money.
Thanks for the responses.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 09:59 am:

Good grief! I'm with Royce, use an old ceiling fan motor, set on the speed you desire. Most likely you will leave it on all the time, even if you have to help it start once it gets up to speed it should maintain it easily. Props will be well balanced I would think or they would shake a plane to pieces. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 10:17 am:

the best would be an old fan motor, not the wimpy junk they sell now. i have a couple from the 30's i'd guess, and they are heavy, real motors. send me a note if interested.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 10:30 am:

I'm thinking that one of those cheap Chinese communist fans would be OD'ed trying to accelerate a 40 lb prop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 10:42 am:

Thanks Clayton...we'll see what happens.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 11:42 am:

Art
Thx for the info on kbelectronics. Looks like interesting stuff.


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