Chickasha find: Raw Ford Model T front axle forging

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Chickasha find: Raw Ford Model T front axle forging
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 06:04 pm:

Here is the details on the find at Chickasha, this axle is the raw forging, as prepared prior to going to the milling and drilling operations for perch, spindle holes and tapping.


Full view of the raw forging


Close up of the fork, note the Ford script on the I beam axle. Bosses are there, but un-machined.






A nifty manufacturing engineering article from 1914 shows the steps of forging a Ford front axle.



Note the raw finished forging on the far right, that is the same part I found. The seller had it for years, acquired from another, don't have any history on how this raw forging got out the factory....but sure fun to have it now for display.

Here is the huge steam press used for forming these front axles.



The engineering article states the last step was to final form each end, and then into a special fixture where the axle was heated and then stretched to final length prior to machining.


Dies used to form the ends of the front axle.

For more info, the article is on line at Google books to read.
http://books.google.com/books?id=IscfAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA11&lpg=PA11&dq=ford+factory+front+axle+forging&source=bl&ots=F4gUZJFCaI&sig=kgXMVgAgaL0P8ePscl3KocXDNyI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=G0gzU4CiN4PH2wX_84HIDA&ved=0CKMBEOgBMA4#v=onepage&q=ford%20factory%20front%20axle%20forging&f=false


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 06:06 pm:

What a neat piece of history, thanks for posting it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 - 11:57 pm:

Having looked at many stashes of NOS Model T Ford parts I have seen parts like these that have not completed all the manufacturing process'.
I believe these parts are items Ford unilaterally shipped to dealers in 1919.
You see, when Ford bought out the minority stockholders in 1919 Ford they required and obtained significant cash financing from New York banks. The first time Ford ever borrowed money to finance Ford Motor Company. To repay these loans Ford shut down manufacturing and shipped all Model T cars and parts on hand (Try to imagine how, in practice this occurred, minions running around the factory collecting anything looking like a Model T part, boxing it up and sending to the shipping room) to dealers under their agreement to accept ANY shipments and pay on behalf of Ford Motor Company. What this meant is if Ford presented their letters of credit to a Detroit bank along with shipment bills of lading the bank paid Ford and the dealer was beholden to the local bank where they had established the letter of credit. The dealer had no recourse because this was part of their dealer agreement and the letter of credit terms were "pay (Ford)at "sight" when Ford presented documents at the tellers window in Detroit.
Essentially Ford dealers financed a major portion of minority stockholder buyout. Ford had this cash on hand. Ford soon re-payed New York banks and reopened the factory for Model T production.
Details of these events can be found from a Ford dealer and official Ford history perspective in the books "A Ford Dealers Twenty Year Ride" and "Ford Expansion and Challenge 1915-1933"
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 08:44 am:

I misspoke. This was the first time Henry Ford personally borrowed money from New York banks.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 09:13 am:

Dan: Glad you got the axle. This belonged to a friend of mine from Arkaansas. I saw it several years ago when he brought it to the swap meet at Petitt Jean State Park in Ark for show and tell. Its a nice find.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 10:37 am:

I have no fact's,only questions? If Ford had done alot of this/that,would more of it showed up even today? The axel in question is worthless as a model t part without the milling drilling faceing machines and the fixtures only had by Ford? Even if Ford had the means at a larger branch would have Henry have payed the extra freight/weight plus the loss of the shavings? If the axel has the markings do they dictated yom? Bud in wheeler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 11:03 am:

Bud: There are a couple of things that we can forget about NOS parts. That is WW1 & WW2. Lots of stuff was scraped, more way than you can think of. I have a friend ( yes, I do have one) that would clean out Ford dealers in the 50's and 60's. He tells of going into a dealer and asking if they had any old T or A parts and was led out to a concrete pad that was fresh poured 2 days before. He told they were all in the pad for rebar, steering cols, axles, cranks, springs, ect. In town in TN there is a rock wall a block long with T wire wheels topping it. Lots of stuff when that way. Dan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JIM WILSON, AMORY, MS on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 01:05 pm:

In the mid 1950's, my high school friend found a Ford dealership that had a warehouse stuffed with NOS T and A parts. He bought them at a price per truck load. Mostly body parts. The only Model A parts he got were ones his help loaded by mistake. He said there were several Model A engine/transmission assemblies still in the shipping crates. A year or so later he went back to get the Model A parts. The dealership owner had taken all that was left and filled ditch on his farm.


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