Stopping seep leak

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2014: Stopping seep leak
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Rosenkrans on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 11:15 am:

I have a frustrating seep leak in one of the lower radiator hoses on my '26 Touring. Hoses are new, cleaned the surfaces thoroughly, proper hose clamps, all good except for this seepage at the top of the upper/lower hose. I tried moving the clamps around and can make it worse, but not better. Also added another clamp with the same effect. I am thinking about placing a bead of silicone sealant around the hose. Any thoughts??


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Vaughn on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 11:21 am:

Just a thought. On my 26 Fordoor, I had what I thought to be a seep leak at the lower radiator hose. It turned out to be the drain cock...I replaced it and haven't had any more trouble.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Rosenkrans on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 11:25 am:

Bill,

Thought about that, but checked it out and its not the issue, leak is at the top of the upper/lower hose where it goes into the lower gooseneck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 11:32 am:

Are you sure it is coming from the hose? Mine had a pin hole in the goose neck and it looked like it was coming from the upper hose and the pinhole was in between the goose neck and the engine block on the back side of the goose neck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 11:36 am:

Wayne,
If it is leaking at the hose/fitting interface then your favorite non-hardening automotive gasket sealer should do the trick.

I would not use silicone sealant because some of that is corrosive.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - Trenton, New Jersey on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 11:41 am:

I had that problem once. Fixed it by taking the hose and soaking it in a dish of very hot water and installed and clamped it tight before it cooled.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 12:07 pm:

If your sure it's the hose not sealing properly your radiator hose connection might be very rough. Try wrapping some teflon tape on the connection before installing the hose. Even electrical tape might work.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Rosenkrans on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 12:54 pm:

Pretty sure its the hose not sealing completely to the goose neck, but hadn't thought about it being a pinhole in the casting. I'll try the gasket sealer when it warms up enough this weekend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike conrad on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 01:47 pm:

The way I have always installed hoses is to give them a wipe with grease. A small ring on the inside of both ends work good. They go on good and come off well also. never had a leak yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Huson, Berthoud, Co. on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 01:49 pm:

Wayne Rosenkrans:

What Hose Clamps are you using. I find that the new style hose clamps are a lot better for not leaking, I throw all the original clamps in the garbage

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 03:22 pm:

I used silicone on the upper connection on my TT several years ago and never looked back. Silicone isn't corrosive to iron, it's used all of the time for gasket sealer. JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 04:50 pm:

Ditto what David says. Silicone sealant is inert. It doesn't corrode anything. I always use it when installing hoses on the radiator and pipes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Leonard J Evansic on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 05:10 pm:

I use silicon sealant, but don't use it like glue. Male sure your metal is clean, then run a nice bead or two around the pipe and let it set for a day or two before you put the hose on and clamp it. if it still leaks look for a crack in your metal. I'm not quite sure what the upper/lower hose is. The upper end of the lower hose is the inlet on the side of the block, and the seepage there might be from a bolt hole that penetrates the water jacket.---Len


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary M. Wheeler on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 06:29 pm:

Wayne..I had the same frustrating seeping from one area of one hose. I used Permatex "Ultra Black" ( PX #82180 ) after thoroughly cleaning the surface, in a nice thin coat. I used gloves so I can spread it nice and smooth around the outlet. All the leaks stopped instantly! Been good over 6 months now.

Permatex


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 07:09 pm:

I have the same problem with my car. I'll be using the Ultra Black as well, especially since the colour matches the engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 07:45 pm:

Thank God your talking about your radiator. For a minute I thought you were talking about a male problem that developes with age.

Unhook the radiator hose at the joint where you are having problems and turn off the garage lights after you place a small light bulb in the cast hose connection. The light will show any pin holes in the metal. If you don't get any pin holes to show up check to see how pitted or rough the metal is. If it is too rough it will never seal and needs to be filled in with a metal mender to make it smooth so the radiator hose seals tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Thode Chehalis Washington on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 08:30 pm:

There are two types of silicone sealants; neutral (non-corrosive) cure silicone and acid curing silicone.

The acid curing silicone is corrosive and would etch into the paint and ultimately cause rust. This is usually designed for use on glass.

The neutral cure silicone is non-corrosive. This is the type of silicone used for metal roofing etc. and one manufacturers website lists the uses including "Weatherproofing caravans and trucks".

It is the safest to assume common silicone sealants are coorosive unless it is labled as non-corrosive. Most non-corrosive grades are normally labeled as such.

Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 08:49 pm:

Dad always taught us to smear some axle grease in the inside of the radiator hoses before installing.
Mike Sa


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Schreier on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 09:25 pm:

I personally like Permatex No. 2 Non-Hardening sealant better than the black RTV for radiator hoses and use it on both my Model T and Model A radiator hoses. As was mentioned earlier, if the metal is heavily pitted it will be quite difficult to get a good seal. If you're using the red hoses the vendors sell, that makes it even more difficult to get a good seal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Thursday, March 27, 2014 - 10:50 pm:

Another alternative that fixed a leak for me when nothing else worked.

Got to Walmart and buy a cheap bicycle inner tube. Cut out a 1" piece and slip it over the radiator outlet thats leaking. A little vaseline on top and the hose will slip right over it. Try a modern worm type clamp as Dave suggested first.

Betcha that'll get it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 01:09 am:

Mike has got my vote. Cheap, easy, and not an issue when you take it apart. Grease is good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 02:24 am:

Silicone isn't an issue either. The rubber hose doesn't stick to it, it will slide right off. Usually easier than a hose that has been clamped to the bare iron for some time. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Jablonski on Friday, March 28, 2014 - 11:03 am:

The rubber hoses from vendors have a hard shiny finish inside. I use 60 grit sandpaper on a mandrel/hand drill to roughen up surface, install & clamp... no leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 12:21 am:

I agree with Bob but also found that the original style clamps do not work as well the new worm drive ones.
The Ultra Black works great but the Right Stuff is better if you don't want to wait for it to cure. The Ultra Black is a lot cheaper as well but be sure to clean any oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By doug hauge upstate NY stittville 13469 on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 09:52 am:

I am with the mikes on this one. I always use grease on all hoses and pipes inlets outlets etc. just a film of grease and they won't leak and go on and come off very nice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Fischer on Saturday, March 29, 2014 - 11:06 am:

Another vote for grease here. Only difference is that I use water pump grease. Don't ask why. Just seemed like a good idea to use something that was water resistant.

Like Doug said, easy on, easy off, no leaks. The other thing I like is, with a light smear of grease, the connection is clean years later and ready to slip on a new hose.

Dick


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